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Rack Your Brains and Help! /73

Cours gratuits > Forum > Exercices du forum || En bas

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Rack Your Brains and Help! /73
Message de here4u posté le 26-06-2020 à 23:48:51 (S | E | F)
Hello, Dear Workers!

Here is your new RYB! I'm sure your brains need racking, paralysed as they may be by the current stifling heat... In Paris, pollution has been back for several days, already...

My student has tried to deal with an energising habit which we may have to imitate... He'll show you a video of it when the correction is online on Friday, July 10th. This exercise is a and I forgot to tell you that 20 mistakes have been left. Can you help him, please? I'm sure you'll find them...

The exercise that moves Japan. 20 mistakes are hidden in this text...
Known by heart along the generations, this uniquely Japanese routine has a surprising origin: «Rajio taiso», or radio calisthenics, is a short exercise routine broadcasted daily on Japan’s national radio, streamed on YouTube, followed in parks and schools everyday – sometimes several times a day – by all generations of Japanese people. Rajio taiso encourages only the moment and weight of your own body without the need for any equipement. The three-minute exercise mostly requires planting your feet in one spot, shoulder wide apart. This makes it ideal for office workers, school children, the young and the elders to do from behind offices, in groups, at the park, at home, anywhere. It’s made up of 13 movements and begins with gentle rising of the arms on the head. In movement two, arms start crossed across the breasts and are swung down like pendulae until they finish outstretched either side. /// END of PART ONE /// This is accompanied by a gentle bob of the knees – hardly enough to break a sweet. By movement 11, exercises move on to modest star jumps in time with music. This is about as rigorous as the routine gets. The two last movements repeat steps one and two to allow some time to cool down. Average life expectancy in 1920 was 42 years in Japan: tubercolosis was common and for life assurers business was hard. By mid-20s, rajio-taiso was launched en masse. To teach the routines, workers at the national postal service – all 20,000 of them – performed the routines on the streets each morning, pausing their rounds as the radio show began. Since then, rajio-taiso has been broadcasted every day, stopping only briefly after the WWII to have some of the more militaristic movements changed. Rajio taiso is instilled in school children from a young age. ///END of PART TWO /// If you ask a Japanese adult how they spent their summer holidays as child, many will reply that they are synonymous with the routines: rising early, attendance card in hand, the children would complete the routines in neighbourhood groups. The cards were stamped after a student took part in one of the early morning routines, with prizes handed out for those children who completed a perfect card. The cards themselves originate from another initiative also dating from the 1920s designed to get children attending school on time, rather than sleeping late. Stamps were first given out at «hayaokikai» or «early-riser meetings» to prove that the students had attended school in the morning. Supposedly, some children then returned to bed after collecting their stamps. Someone came up with a plan to get the children performing «rajio taiso» at these early morning meetings, after which they would have their cards stamped./// END of PART THREE /// With their blood pumping, the children were too awoken to go back to bed. While exercise is linked to an increase in muscle injury in older people, light exercise routines can have a very positive impact on their independence. A review of studies on exercise plans for the aged found that walking speed and time taken to stand out of a chair can be positively improved in even the most frail individuals with light stretching. However, the link between exercise and mental aging in older people is less clear. While there is a lot of encouraging evidence linking exercise with protection from cognitive decline, the mechanism by which this happens is poorly understood. Certainly, for followers of "rajio taiso", the daily stretches seem to do the trick. As familiar as a nursery rhyme, they remain a society-wide daily diet which will surely continue to brighten people’s mornings for generations to come. /// END of THE TEXT ///

Hum... Not very easy, I'm afraid... I give you a double share of THE FORCE...


Réponse : Rack Your Brains and Help! /73 de magie8, postée le 28-06-2020 à 18:55:50 (S | E)
mistakes are hidden in this text... BONJOUR HEUREUSE DE RETROUVER TOUS LES FAMILIERS AU COMPLET ET DES NOUVEAUX ARRIVES . EN PROGRES
The exercise that moves Japan.
Known by heart ACROSS the generations, this uniquely Japanese routine has a surprising origin: «Rajio taiso», or radio calisthenics, is a short exercise routine BROADCASTING daily on Japan’s national radio, streamed on YouTube, followed in parks and schools EVERY-DAY – sometimes several times a day – by all generations of Japanese people. Rajio taiso encourages only the moment and weight of your own body without the need for any EQUIPMENT . The three-minute exercise mostly requires planting your feet in one spot, SHOULDERS wide apart. This makes it ideal for office workers, school children, the YOUTHS and the elders to do from behind offices, in groups, at the park, at home, anywhere. It’s made up of 13 movements and begins with A gentle rising of the arms on the head. In movement two, arms start CROSSING across the breasts and are swung down like PENDULUM until they finish outstretched either side. /// END of PART ONE /// This is accompanied by a gentle BEND of the knees – hardly enough to break SWEAT . By movement 11, exercises move on to modest star jumps in time with THE music. This is about as rigorous as the routine gets. The two last movements repeat steps one and two to allow some time to cool down. Average life expectancy in 1920 was 42 years in Japan: TUBERCULOSIS was common and for life ASSURANCE BUSINESS was hard. By THE MIDDLE OF THE 20TH CENTURY -, rajio-taiso was launched en masse. To teach the routines, workers at the national postal service – all 20,000 of them – HAVE performed the routines on the streets each morning, pausing their rounds as the radio show began. Since then, rajio-taiso has been BROADCASTING every day, stopping only briefly after the WWII to have some of the more militaristic movements changed. Rajio taiso is instilled in school children from a young age. ///END of PART TWO /// If you ask a Japanese adult how they spent their summer holidays as child, many will reply that they are synonymous with the routines: rising early, attendance card in hand, the children would complete the routines in NEIGHBORHOOD groups. The cards were stamped after a student took part in one of the early morning routines, with prizes handed out for those children who completed a perfect card. The cards themselves originate from another initiative also dating FROM 1920 designed to get children attending school on time, rather than sleeping late. Stamps were first given out at «hayaokikai» or «early-riser meetings» to prove that the students had attended school in the morning. Supposedly, some children then returned to bed after collecting their stamps. Someone came up with a plan to get the children performing «rajio taiso» at these early morning meetings, after which they would have their cards stamped./// END of PART THREE /// With their blood pumping, the children were too awoken to go back to bed. While exercise is linked to an increase in MUSCLES INJURIES
in older people, light exercise routines can have a very positive impact on their independence. A review of studies on exercise plans for the aged found that walking speed and time taken to stand out of a chair can be positively improved in even the most frail individuals with light stretching. However, the link between exercise and mental aging in older people is less clear. While there is a lot of encouraging evidence linking exercise with protection from cognitive decline, the mechanism by which this happens is poorly understood. Certainly, for followers of "rajio taiso", the daily stretches seem to do the trick. As familiar as a nursery rhyme, they remain a society-wide daily diet which will surely continue to brighten people’s mornings for generations to come. /// END of THE TEXT ///

Hum... Not very easy, I'm afraid... I give you a double share of THE FORCE...



Réponse : Rack Your Brains and Help! /73 de taiji43, postée le 30-06-2020 à 18:05:31 (S | E)
DEAR HERE4U
I have used my dictionary ans my eyes to double-check the words and verbs or expressions sounding out of tune; howeverI am pleased to do it, but you don't have to be in hurry to do anything else!

READY TO BE CORRECTED

The exercise that or WHICH moves Japan

Known by heart ACCROSS the generations, this uniquely Japanese routine has a surprising origin: «Rajio taiso», or radio calisthenics, is a short exercise routine BROADCAST (diffusé du verbe broadcast ) daily on Japan’s national radio, streamed on YouTube, followed in parks and schools everyday – sometimes several times a day – by all generations of Japanese people. Rajio taiso encourages only the moment and weight of your own body without NEEDING any EQUIPMENT. The three-minute exercise mostly REQUIRE planting your feet in one spot, SHOULDERS WIDTH -apart = pieds écartéz à la LARGEUR des épaules

This makes it ideal for office workers, school children, the YOUTH and the ELDERLY( les personnes agées) to do from behind offices, in groups, at the park, at home, anywhere. It’s made up of 13 movements and begins with gentle RAISING (eyes, arm, leg) of the arms ABOVE(au dessus) the head. In movement two, arms start crossed across( the BREAST Or CHEST = poitrine) and are swung down like pendulae???PENDULUM until they finish outstretched either side.

/// END of PART ONE /// This is accompanied by a gentle bob????? of the knees – hardly enough to break SWEAT (sueur pas sucrerie). By movement 11, exercises move on to modest star jumps in time with THe (cette musique précise)music. This is about as rigorous as the routine gets. The LAST TWO movements repeat steps one and two to allow FOR some time (pour quelques temps) or AT TIMES (par instants to cool down.

Average life expectancy in 1920 was 42 years in Japan: TUBERCULOSIS was common and for life insurers business was hard. By THe mid-20TH CENTURY, rajio-taiso was launched en masse

To teach the routines, workers at the national postal service – all 20,000 of them – WERE USED TO PERFORMING the routines on the streets each morning, pausing their rounds as the radio show began. Since then, rajio-taiso has been BROADCAST every day, stopping only briefly after the WWII to have some of the MOST militaristic movements HAVE changed. Rajio taiso is instilled in school children from a young age.

///END of PART TWO /// If you ask a Japanese adult how they spent their summer holidays as child, many will reply that they are synonymous with the routines: rising early, attendance card in hand, the children would complete the routines in neighbourhood groups. The cards were stamped after a student took part in one of the early morning routines, with prizes handed out for those children who completed a perfect card. The cards themselves originate from another initiative also dating from the 1920s designed to get children TO ATTEND school on time, rather than SLEEP late. Stamps were first given out at «hayaokikai» or «early-riser meetings» to prove that the students had attended school in the morning. Supposedly, some children then returned to bed after collecting their stamps. Someone came up with a plan to get children TO PERFORM «rajio taiso» at these early morning meetings, after which they would have their cards stamped

./// END of PART THREE /// With their blood pumping, the children were too AWAKE to go back While or WHEREAS (alors que) exercise is linked to an increase in (OK) muscle INJURIES in older people, light exercise routines can have a very positive impact on their independence . A review of studies on exercise plans for the aged found that SPEED WALKING or FAST WALK (marche rapide) and time taken to stand out(s'élever contre AGAINST) a chair can be positively improved in even the most frail individuals with light stretching. However, the link between exercise and mental aging = AGEAING (OK) in older people is less clear. While or WHEREAS there is a lot of encouraging evidence linking exercise with protection from cognitive decline, the mechanism by which this happens is poorly understood. Or MISENDERSTOOD Certainly, for THE followers of "rajio taiso", the daily stretches seem to do the trick.(faire l'affaire )As familiar as a nursery rhyme, they remain a society-wide daily REGIMEN which will surely continue to brighten people’s mornings for COMING generation. /// END of THE TEXT ///



Réponse : Rack Your Brains and Help! /73 de joe39, postée le 30-06-2020 à 19:21:33 (S | E)
Hello, dear here4u,
After some hard sessions of brain calisthenics,
I’m sending you my correction,
ready to be checked.
20 mistakes.
The exercise that moves Japan. 20 mistakes are hidden in this text...
Known by heart along the generations, this uniquely Japanese routine has a surprising origin: «Rajio taiso», or radio calisthenics, is a short exercise routine broadcasted daily on Japan’s national radio, streamed on YouTube, followed in parks and schools everyday – sometimes several times a day – by all generations of Japanese people. Rajio taiso encourages USING ONLY THE MOMENTUM - 1 and weight of your own body without the need for any EQUIPMENT - 2. The three-minute exercise mostly requires planting your feet in one spot, SHOULDERS WIDTH - 3 apart. This makes it ideal for office workers, school children, the young and the ELDERLY - 4 to do from behind DESKS - 5, in groups, at the park, at home, anywhere. It’s made up of 13 movements and begins with gentle rising of the arms ABOVE - 6 the head. In movement two, arms start crossed across the BREAST - 7 and are swung down like PENDULUMS or PENDULA - 8 until they finish outstretched either side. /// END of PART ONE ///
This is accompanied by a gentle bob of the knees – hardly enough to break a SWEAT - 9. /By movement 11, exercises move on to modest star jumps in time with music. This is about as rigorous as the routine gets. The LAST TWO - 10 movements repeat steps one and two to allow FOR -11 some time to cool down.




Average life expectancy in 1920 was 42 years in Japan: TUBERCULOSIS - 12
was common and for life INSURERS - 13 business was hard./ By mid-20s, rajio-taiso was launched en masse. To teach the routines, workers at the national postal service – all 20,000 of them – performed the routines on the streets each morning, pausing their rounds as the radio show began
. Since then, rajio-taiso has been broadcasted every day, stopping only briefly after (the - 14 ) WWII to have some of the more militaristic movements changed. Rajio taiso is instilled in school children from a young age. ///END of PART TWO ///

If you ask a Japanese adult how they spent their summer holidays as child, many will reply that they are synonymous with the routines: rising early, attendance card in hand, the children would complete the routines in neighbourhood groups. The cards ARE - 15 stamped after a student TAKES – 16 part in one of the early morning routines, with prizes handed out for those children who HAVE - 17 completed a perfect card.

The cards themselves originate from another initiative also dating from the 1920s designed to get children attending school on time, rather than SLEEP - 18 late. Stamps were first given out at «hayaokikai» or «early-riser meetings» to prove that the students had attended school in the morning. Supposedly, some children then returned to bed after collecting their stamps. Someone came up with a plan to get the children performing «rajio taiso» at these early morning meetings, after which they would have their cards stamped./// END of PART THREE ///

With their blood pumping, the children were too AWAKE - 19 to go back to bed. While exercise is linked to an increase in muscle injury in older people, light exercise routines can have a very positive impact on their independence. A review of studies on exercise plans for the aged found that walking speed and time taken to stand out of a chair can be positively improved in even the most frail individuals with light stretching. However, the link between exercise and mental aging in older people is less clear. /While there is a lot of encouraging evidence linking exercise with protection from cognitive decline, the mechanism by which this happens is poorly understood./

/Certainly, for followers of "rajio taiso", the daily stretches seem to do the trick. As familiar as a nursery rhyme, they remain a society-wide daily REGIMEN –20 which will surely continue to brighten people’s mornings for generations to come. /// END of THE TEXT ///

I thank you very much and hope you have a pleasant evening.

So long.
Joe39




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