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Rack Your Brains/101

Cours gratuits > Forum > Exercices du forum || En bas

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Rack Your Brains/101
Message de here4u posté le 29-08-2021 à 22:04:34 (S | E | F)
Hello, dear Friends!

Here is your new exercise! I shortened it so that it wouldn't give you too much work or take too much time...
It has held my Student's attention and he has tried hard... but "managed" to leave 15 mistakes in the report he has written. I do hope you'll help him and correct them!

PLEASE HELP MY STUDENT CORRECT HIS MISTAKES!

We put a lot of value on a first kiss. But why is kissing so special? One idea is that like babies we have an innate liking for lip-touching. From breastfeeding outwards, we associate our lips with positive reinforcements. There is a suggestion that we specifically fine-tuned
to lip-on-lip kissing because, back in our evolutionary past, after winning, our mothers would chew our food for us and then transfer it
into our mouth. This is called premastication food transfer and is a known behaviour in many animals. Thankfully we now have baby food.
Secondly, our lips are very sensible – in fact they are one of the few very sensible parts of us that we don’t cover with clothes. (The more clothes you wear, the greater the frequency of kissing.) The Inuits in the Arctic Circle are the only hunters and gathering group that we found that kiss – that’s the famous oceanic kiss, rubbing your noses. They’re not just rubbing their mouth over each other’s mouth. Why ? In all other places where there are hunters and gatherers, they wear no clothes./// END OF PART ONE/// That means they can have a sensual encounter with any part of the body, but when you wear clothes, the only sensuality that’s available is the human face. Lastly, there might be an evolutionary purpose to kissing. By getting up closed with one another, we can pick up on cues in each other’s scent. Kissing implies a sense of trust to get that close with another individual. It’s about trust and it’s about connection and they all serve a common purpose: to bring us closer with the people that we care. Kissing by pressing our lips together is an almost uniquely human behaviour. If kissing has an evolutionary purpose, why don’t we see more animals kissed? While some bird species knock bills in courtship and many mammal species rely heavily on closed sniffing to determine friend to foe, very few animal species actually plant their lips on one another’s. It might be because humans’ scent abilities are quite poor compared to many of our mammal relatives. ///END OF PART TWO/// Humans might have needed to get much closer with one another to have a good sniff. In doing so, we started to kiss.
But why not do some cultures kiss? and will we always kiss? We’ve seen kissing arrive and disappear around the world for a variety of reasons. From disease, even before we knew about germ theory, it was clear that there were certain things that we could do to avoid to get sick. There were emperors that would ban kissing among their people, because they thought that wasn't a privilege people should have. The one thing you can count on that we’ve seen over and over still, is though proclamations where it was banned, though disease and plague, it always comes back! ///END OF THE TEXT///.

Cet exercice est un La correction sera postée le dimanche 12 septembre 2021.

May THE FORCE be with all of us!


Réponse : Rack Your Brains/101 de susu52, postée le 31-08-2021 à 14:02:50 (S | E)
Hello !!!
Here's my try !
Thanks a lot again!

We put a lot of value on a first kiss. But why is kissing so special? One idea is that like babies we have an innate liking for lip-touching. From breastfeeding outwards, we associate our lips with positive reinforcements. There is a suggestion that we specifically fine-tuned
to lip-on-lip kissing because, back in our evolutionary past, after WHINING, our MOTHER would chew our food for us and then transfer it
into our mouth. This is called premastication food transfer and is a known behaviour FOR many animals. Thankfully we now have baby food.
Secondly, our lips are very SENSITIVE – in fact they are one of the few very SENSITIVE parts of us that we don’t cover with clothes. (The more clothes you wear, the greater the frequency of kissing.) The Inuits FROM the Arctic Circle are the only hunters and gathering GROUPS that we found that kiss – that’s the famous oceanic kiss, rubbing your NOSE. They’re not just rubbing their mouth over each other’s mouth. Why ? In all other places where there are hunters and gatherers, they wear no clothes./// END OF PART ONE/// That means they can have a sensual encounter with any part of the body, but when you wear clothes, the only sensuality that’s available is the human face. Lastly, there might be an evolutionary purpose to kissing. By getting up CLOSE with one another, we can pick up on cues in each other’s scent. Kissing implies a sense of trust to get that close with another individual. It’s about trust and it’s about connection and they all serve a common purpose: to bring us closer with the people WHOM we care. Kissing by pressing our lips together is an almost uniquely human behaviour. If kissing has an evolutionary purpose, why don’t we see more animals KISS? While some bird species knock bills in courtship and many mammal species rely heavily on closed sniffing to determine friend OR foe, very few animal species actually plant their lips on one another’s. It might be because humans’ scent abilities are quite poor compared to many of our mammal relatives. ///END OF PART TWO/// Humans might have needed to get much closer with one another to have a good sniff. In doing so, we started to kiss.
But why DON'T some cultures kiss? AND (majuscule) will we always kiss? We’ve seen kissing arrive and disappear around the world for a variety of reasons. From disease, even before we knew about germ theory, it was clear that there were certain things that we could do to avoid GETTING sick. There were emperors that would ban kissing among their people, because they thought that wasn't a privilege people should have. The one thing you can count on that we’ve seen over and over still, is though proclamations WHEN it was banned, though disease and plague, it always comes back! ///END OF THE TEXT///.

------------------
Modifié par lucile83 le 01-09-2021 07:56
gris




Réponse : Rack Your Brains/101 de taiji43, postée le 31-08-2021 à 16:10:39 (S | E)
Dear here and my anglais facile mates.I am glad ... I missed English despite the beauty of the mountains.
I hope you are in good health, see you soon for the next part

We put a lot of value on a first kiss. But why is kissing so special? One idea is that AS babies we have an innate liking for lip-touching. From breastfeeding outwads(loin) jusqu’à we associate our lips with positive reinforcements. There is a suggestion that we specifically fine-tuned
to lip-on-lip kissing because, back in our evolutionary past, after winning, ??? SUCKLING allaitement ) gagner ici ne veut rien dire )??? our mothers would chew our food for us and then transfer it OR MIGH tchew hypothèse ) ???

into our mouth. This is called premastication food transfer and is a known behaviour in many animals. Thankfully we now have baby food.
Secondly, our lips are very sensible – in fact they are one of the few very sensible parts of us that we don’t cover with clothes. (The more clothes you wear, the greater the frequency of kissing.) The Inuits in the Arctic Circle are the only HUNTER (the only) and gathering group that we found that kiss – that’s the famous oceanic kiss, rubbing your noses. They’re not just rubbing their mouth over each other’s mouth. Why ? In all other places where there are hunters and gatherers, they wear no clothes./// END OF PART ONE///

That means they can have a sensual encounter with any part of the body, but when you wear clothes, the only sensuality that’s available is the human face. Lastly, there might be an evolutionary purpose to kissing. By getting up CLOSE TO one another, we can pick up on cues in each other’s scent. Kissing implies a sense of trust to get that CLOSE TO another individual. It’s about trust and it’s about connection and they all serve a common purpose: to bring us closer with the people that we care. Kissing by pressing our lips together is an almost uniquely human behaviour. If kissing has an evolutionary purpose, why don’t we see more animals KISSING (embrassant , qui embrassent) ? While some bird species knock bills in courtship and many mammal species rely heavily on closed sniffing to determine friend FROM foe, (entre les deux) very few animal species actually plant their lips on one another’s. It might be because humans’ scent abilities are quite poor compared to many of our mammal relatives. ///END OF PART TWO///

Humans might have needed to get much closer TO one another to have a good sniff. In doing so, we started to kiss.
But why some cultures D'ONT kiss? and will we always kiss? We’ve seen kissing arrive and disappear around the world for a variety of reasons. From disease, even before we knew about germ theory, it was clear that there were certain things that we could do to avoid GETTING sick. There were emperors that would ban kissing among their people, because they thought that wasn't a privilege people should have. The one thing you can count on that WE HAVE BEEN over and over AGAIN (à nouveau), is DESPITE THE proclamations where it HAS BEE BANNED (l’action se continue dans le présent),DESPITE magré + nom = Despite though = bien que +verbe)

READY TO BE CORRECTED



Réponse : Rack Your Brains/101 de maxwell, postée le 06-09-2021 à 21:01:42 (S | E)
READY TO BE CORRECTED

Hello Here4U
I don't know if I helped your student enough... But I did my best, no matter what. Thanks again!

Help My Student:

We put a lot of value on a first kiss. But why is kissing so special? One idea is that like babies we have an innate liking for lip-touching. From breastfeeding ONWARDS , we'VE ASSOCIATED our lips with positive reinforcements. There is a THEORY that we'VE specifically fine-tuned OUR lip-TO-lip kissing because, back in our evolutionary past, after WHINING, our mothers would chew our food for us and then transfer it
into our MOUTHS. This is called premastication food transfer and is a known behaviour in many animals. Thankfully we now have baby food.
Secondly, our lips are very SENSITIVE– in fact they are one of the few very SENSITIVE parts of us that we don’t cover with clothes. (The more clothes you wear, the greater the frequency of kissing.) The Inuits in the Arctic Circle are the only hunters and gathering group that we'VE found KISSING – that’s the famous oceanic kiss, rubbing your noses. They’re not just rubbing EACH OTHER'S MOUTHS . Why? In all other places where there are hunters and gatherers, they wear no clothes./// END OF PART ONE/// That means they can have a sensual encounter with any part of the body, but when you wear clothes, the only sensuality that’s available is the human face. Lastly, there might be an evolutionary purpose to kissing. By getting up CLOSE TO one another, we can pick up on cues FROM each other’s scent. Kissing implies a sense of trust to get that close TO another individual. It’s about trust and it’s about connection and they all serve a common purpose: to bring us closer TO the people that we care ABOUT. Kissing by pressing our lips together is ALMOST an uniquely human behaviour. If kissing has an evolutionary purpose, why don’t we see more animals KISS? While some bird species knock bills in courtship and many mammal species rely heavily on CLOSE-sniffing to determine friend to foe, very few animal species actually plant their lips on one another’s. It might be because HUMAN SMELL abilities are quite poor compared to many of our mammal relatives. ///END OF PART TWO///
Humans might have needed to get much closer TO one another to have a good sniff. In doing so, we started to kiss.
But why DON'T some cultures kiss? and will we always kiss? We’ve seen kissing arrive and disappear around the world for a variety of reasons. From disease, even before we knew about germ theory, it was clear that there were certain things that we could do to avoid GETTING sick. There were emperors that would ban kissing among their people, because they thought that wasn't a privilege people should have. The one thing you can count on that we’ve seen over and over AGAIN, is DESPITE THE proclamations where it was banned, IN SPITE OF disease and plague, it always comes back! ///END OF THE TEXT///.



Réponse : Rack Your Brains/101 de here4u, postée le 11-09-2021 à 18:36:24 (S | E)
Hello!

My poor student really needs some help! You still have a few hours to step in...



Réponse : Rack Your Brains/101 de here4u, postée le 12-09-2021 à 23:46:55 (S | E)
Hello, dear Friends!

Voici votre correction ! Un grand et à vous qui avez travaillé (et rendu ce travail).

We put a lot of value on a first kiss. But why is kissing so special? One idea is that as babies (1) we have an innate liking for lip-touching. From breastfeeding onwards,(2) we associate our lips with positive reinforcements. There is a suggestion that we specifically fine-tuned to lip-on-lip kissing because, back in our evolutionary past, after weaning,(3) our mothers would chew our food for us and then transfer it
into our mouths (4). This is called premastication food transfer and is a known behaviour in many animals. Thankfully we now have baby food.
Secondly, our lips are very sensitive (5)– in fact they are one of the few very sensitive parts of us that we don’t cover with clothes. (The more clothes you wear, the greater the frequency of kissing.) The Inuits in the Arctic Circle are the only hunter and gathering group (6) that we found that kiss – that’s the famous oceanic kiss, rubbing your noses.(4) They’re not just rubbing their mouth over each other’s mouth. Why ? In all other places where there are hunters and gatherers, they wear no clothes./// END OF PART ONE /// That means they can have a sensual encounter with any part of the body, but when you wear clothes, the only sensuality that’s available is the human face. Lastly, there might be an evolutionary purpose to kissing. By getting up close to (7) one another, we can pick up on cues in each other’s scent. Kissing implies a sense of trust to get that close to another individual. It’s about trust and it’s about connection and they all serve a common purpose: to bring us closer to the people that we care about.(8) Kissing by pressing our lips together is an almost uniquely human behaviour. If kissing has an evolutionary purpose, why don’t we see more animals kissing (9)? While some bird species knock bills in courtship and many mammal species rely heavily on close(7) sniffing to determine friend from foe (10), very few animal species actually plant their lips on one another’s. It might be because humans’ scent abilities are quite poor compared to (11) many of our mammal relatives. ///END OF PART TWO /// Humans might have needed to get much closer to (7) one another to have a good sniff. In doing so, we started to kiss.
But why do some cultures not kiss? (12) and will we always kiss? We’ve seen kissing arrive and disappear around the world for a variety of different reasons. From disease, even before we knew about germ theory, it was clear that there were certain things that we could do to avoid getting sick. There were emperors that would ban kissing among their people, because they thought that wasn't a privilege people should have. The one thing you can count on that we’ve seen over and over again(13), is despite(14) proclamations where it was banned, despite(14) disease and plague, it always comes back!


(1) «Like babies» introduirait une comparaison ; like + nom = comme /// «as babies»= en tant que … lorsque nous étions …
(2) «onwards» : forward in time; from (date/ point de repère) onward: à partir de
(3) «to wean» ; Lien internet
=> "weaning": Ne pas confondre avec «winning» (to win, I won, won): gagner
(4) «transfer it into our mouths»: Chacun n’a qu’une bouche, mais c’est le pluriel concret (en tout, il y en a plusieurs ...) : "with pipes in their mouths and hats on their heads… "
(5) «To be sensitive»: Lien internet
Ne pas confondre avec «to be sensible»: to be reasonable; Lien internet

(6) «the only hunter and gathering group»/ «the only hunting and gathering group» : c’est la première formule qui était dans le texte. Hunter est en position adjectivale => ne prend pas de –s.
(7) «close to» : près de/ proche de. Bien distinguer «CLOSE (to)» et «to close» => closed.
(8) "To care about someone": prendre soin de/ rejet de la particule adverbiale obligatoire.
(9) "why don’t we see more animals kissing/ kiss": kissed est un participe passé et indiquerait que l’action est subie par le sujet. Ici le sujet est « en train de » (fait l’action)=> "kissing". Cette forme signifierait que l’action est saisie au milieu de son déroulement. Il est également possible de mettre «kiss», qui indiquerait que l’action a été perçue dans son ensemble.
(10) «determine friend from foe»: bien remarquer les allitérations en F… make a difference between friend and foe (enemy).
(11) Lien internet
Surprisingly, my Student has corrected his mistake. I simply wanted to tell you the (slight) difference between the two expressions…
(12) But why not do some cultures kiss?: "But why do some cultures not kiss?" La « faute » était grossière … Il s’agissait de bien construire la forme interrogative tout en tenant compte de la négation.
(13) "over and over again": Lien internet

(14) «despite»: malgré, en dépit de, alors que «though»: bien que.

Voilà ! Il ne nous reste plus qu'à évoquer le Follow Up Work et à demander l'engagement de trois volontaires pour traduire les trois parties. Tout le monde peut participer ! Le travail par lui-même n'est pas urgent !
Merci de votre aide ! et bravo à nos participants !!!



Réponse : Rack Your Brains/101 de maxwell, postée le 14-09-2021 à 20:54:49 (S | E)
Hello
J'essaierai de dégager du temps pour prendre la 1e partie

We put a lot of value on a first kiss. But why is kissing so special? One idea is that as babies we have an innate liking for lip-touching. From breastfeeding onwards, we associate our lips with positive reinforcements. There is a suggestion that we specifically fine-tuned to lip-on-lip kissing because, back in our evolutionary past, after weaning, our mothers would chew our food for us and then transfer it into our mouths. This is called premastication food transfer and is a known behaviour in many animals. Thankfully we now have baby food.
Secondly, our lips are very sensitive– in fact they are one of the few very sensitive parts of us that we don’t cover with clothes. (The more clothes you wear, the greater the frequency of kissing.) The Inuits in the Arctic Circle are the only hunter and gathering group that we found that kiss – that’s the famous oceanic kiss, rubbing your noses. They’re not just rubbing their mouth over each other’s mouth. Why ? In all other places where there are hunters and gatherers, they wear no clothes.


Nous accordons beaucoup de valeur à un premier baiser. Mais pourquoi s'embrasser est-il si spécial ? Une idée est que, bébés, nous avons un goût inné pour le contact avec les lèvres. Dès l'allaitement, nous associons nos lèvres à des renforcements positifs. Il est suggéré que nous nous sommes spécialement adaptés au baiser sur la bouche parce que, dans notre passé évolutif, après le sevrage, nos mères mastiquaient la nourriture à notre place et la transféraient dans notre bouche. C'est ce qu'on appelle le transfert de nourriture pré-mastiquée et c'est un comportement connu chez de nombreux animaux. Heureusement, nous avons maintenant des aliments pour bébé.
Deuxièmement, nos lèvres sont très sensibles - en fait, c'est l'une de nos rares parties très sensibles que nous ne recouvrons pas de vêtements. (Plus on porte de vêtements, plus grande est la fréquence du baiser.)
Les Inuits dans le cercle arctique représentent la seule communauté de chasseurs et de cueilleurs que l'on a pu trouver s'embrassant - c'est le fameux baiser esquimau, où l'on se frotte le nez. Ils ne font pas que se frotter la bouche l'une contre l'autre. Pourquoi ? Partout ailleurs où il y a des chasseurs et des cueilleurs, ils ne portent pas de vêtements.

Pas si évident à traduire



Réponse : Rack Your Brains/101 de magie8, postée le 16-09-2021 à 12:54:37 (S | E)
hello bonjour , je travaille pour traduire la 2e partie ,

That means they can have a sensual encounter with any part of the body, but when you wear clothes, the only sensuality that’s available is the human face. Lastly, there might be an evolutionary purpose to kissing. By getting up close to (7) one another, we can pick up on cues in each other’s scent. Kissing implies a sense of trust to get that close to another individual. It’s about trust and it’s about connection and they all serve a common purpose: to bring us closer to the people that we care about.(8) Kissing by pressing our lips together is an almost uniquely human behaviour. If kissing has an evolutionary purpose, why don’t we see more animals kissing (9)? While some bird species knock bills in courtship and many mammal species rely heavily on close(7) sniffing to determine friend from foe (10), very few animal species actually plant their lips on one another’s. It might be because humans’ scent abilities are quite poor compared to (11) many of our mammal relatives. ///

Cela signifie qu'ils peuvent avoir une rencontre sensuelle avec n'importe quelle partie du corps, mais lorsque vous portez des vêtements, la seule sensualité disponible est celle du visage humain. Enfin, le baiser pourrait avoir un rôle évolutif. En nous rapprochant les uns des autres, nous pouvons percevoir des indices dans l'odeur de l'autre. Le baiser implique un sentiment de confiance pour s'approcher aussi près d'un autre individu. Il s'agit de confiance et de connexion, et tous ces éléments ont un objectif commun: nous rapprocher des personnes qui nous sont chères. Embrasser en pressant les lèvres l'une contre l'autre est un comportement humain. Si le baiser à un but évolutif, pourquoi ne voit-on pas plus d'animaux s'embrasser ? Alors que certaines espèces d'oiseaux se frappent le bec pour se faire la cour et que de nombreuses espèces de mammifères se fient beaucoup à l'odorat rapproché pour distinguer un ami d'un ennemi, très peu d'espèces animales posent réellement leurs lèvres l'une sur l'autre. Cela pourrait s'expliquer par le fait que les capacités olfactives de l'homme sont assez faibles par rapport à celles de la plupart de notre famille des mammifères.





Réponse : Rack Your Brains/101 de magie8, postée le 17-09-2021 à 19:07:42 (S | E)
Humans might have needed to get much closer to (7) one another to have a good sniff. In doing so, we started to kiss.
But why do some cultures not kiss? (12) and will we always kiss? We’ve seen kissing arrive and disappear around the world for a variety of different reasons. From disease, even before we knew about germ theory, it was clear that there were certain things that we could do to avoid getting sick. There were emperors that would ban kissing among their people, because they thought that wasn't a privilege people should have. The one thing you can count on that we’ve seen over and over again(13), is despite(14) proclamations where it was banned, despite(14) disease and plague, it always comes back!

Hello voici la traduction de la dernière partie
Les humains auraient peut-être eu besoin de se rapprocher beaucoup plus l'un de l'autre pour humer une bonne odeur. C'est ainsi que nous avons commencé à nous embrasser. Mais pourquoi certaines cultures ne s'embrassent-elles pas ? et nous embrasserons nous toujours? Nous avons vu le baiser apparaître et disparaître dans le monde entier pour différentes raisons. Pour les maladies même avant que nous ne connaissions la théorie des germes, il était clair qu'il y avait certaines choses que nous pouvions faire pour éviter de tomber malade. Certains empereurs interdisaient à leur peuple de s'embrasser, car ils pensaient que ce n'était pas un privilège que les gens devaient avoir. La seule chose sur laquelle vous pouvez compter et que nous avons vue encore et encore, c'est que malgré les proclamations là où c'était interdit, malgré les maladies et la peste il revient toujours.



Réponse : Rack Your Brains/101 de here4u, postée le 17-09-2021 à 21:47:11 (S | E)
Hello, Dears!

CORRECTION DU FOLLOW UP WORK:

We put a lot of value on a first kiss. But why is kissing so special? One idea is that as babies we have an innate liking for lip-touching. From breastfeeding onwards, we associate our lips with positive reinforcements. There is a suggestion that we specifically fine-tuned to lip-on-lip kissing because, back in our evolutionary past, after weaning, our mothers would chew our food for us and then transfer it
into our mouths. This is called premastication food transfer and is a known behaviour in many animals. Thankfully we now have baby food.
Secondly, our lips are very sensitive – in fact they are one of the few very sensitive parts of us that we don’t cover with clothes. (The more clothes you wear, the greater the frequency of kissing.) The Inuits in the Arctic Circle are the only hunter and gathering group that we found that kiss – that’s the famous oceanic kiss, rubbing your noses. They’re not just rubbing their mouth over each other’s mouth. Why? In all other places where there are hunters and gatherers, they wear no clothes.

Nous accordons beaucoup de valeur à un premier baiser. Mais pourquoi s'embrasser est-il si spécial ? Une idée est que, bébés, nous avons un goût inné pour le contact avec les lèvres. Dès l'allaitement, nous associons nos lèvres à des renforcements positifs. Il est suggéré que nous nous sommes spécialement adaptés au baiser sur la bouche parce que, dans notre passé évolutif, après le sevrage, nos mères mastiquaient la nourriture à notre place et la transféraient dans notre bouche. C'est ce qu'on appelle le transfert de nourriture pré-mastiquée et c'est un comportement connu chez de nombreux animaux. Heureusement, nous avons maintenant des aliments pour bébé ...
Deuxièmement, nos lèvres sont très sensibles - en fait, elles qont l'une des rares parties très sensibles que nous ne recouvrons pas de vêtements. (Plus on porte de vêtements, plus grande est la fréquence du baiser.) Les Inuits dans le cercle arctique représentent la seule communauté de chasseurs et de cueilleurs que l'on a pu trouver s'embrassant - c'est le fameux baiser esquimau, où l'on se frotte le nez. Ils ne font pas que se frotter la bouche l'une contre l'autre. Pourquoi ? Partout ailleurs où il y a des chasseurs et des cueilleurs, ils ne portent pas de vêtements.

C'est parfait, Maxwell ! BRAVO !

That means they can have a sensual encounter with any part of the body, but when you wear clothes, the only sensuality that’s available is the human face. Lastly, there might be an evolutionary purpose to kissing. By getting up close to one another, we can pick up on cues in each other’s scent. Kissing implies a sense of trust to get that close to another individual. It’s about trust and it’s about connection and they all serve a common purpose: to bring us closer to the people that we care about. Kissing by pressing our lips together is an almost uniquely human behaviour. If kissing has an evolutionary purpose, why don’t we see more animals kissing? While some bird species knock bills in courtship and many mammal species rely heavily on close sniffing to determine friend from foe, very few animal species actually plant their lips on one another’s. It might be because humans’ scent abilities are quite poor compared to many of our mammal relatives. ///END OF PART TWO ///

Cela signifie qu'ils peuvent avoir une rencontre sensuelle avec n'importe quelle partie du corps, mais lorsque vous portez des vêtements, la seule sensualité disponible est celle du visage humain. Enfin, le baiser pourrait avoir un rôle évolutif. En nous rapprochant les uns des autres, nous pouvons percevoir des indices dans l'odeur de l'autre. Le baiser implique un sentiment de confiance pour s'approcher aussi près d'un autre individu. Il s'agit de confiance et de connexion, et tous ces éléments ont un objectif commun: nous rapprocher des personnes qui nous sont chères. Embrasser en pressant les lèvres l'une contre l'autre est un comportement humain. Si le baiser à un but évolutif, pourquoi ne voit-on pas plus d'animaux s'embrasser ? Alors que certaines espèces d'oiseaux se frappent le bec pour se faire la cour et que de nombreuses espèces de mammifères se fient beaucoup à l'odorat rapproché pour distinguer un ami d'un ennemi, très peu d'espèces animales posent réellement leurs lèvres sur celles de l'autre. Cela pourrait s'expliquer par le fait que les capacités olfactives de l'homme sont assez faibles par rapport à celles de la plupart de notre famille des mammifères.
C'est parfait aussi, Magie !

Humans might have needed to get much closer to one another to have a good sniff. In doing so, we started to kiss.
But why do some cultures not kiss? and will we always kiss? We’ve seen kissing arrive and disappear around the world for a variety of different reasons. From disease, even before we knew about germ theory, it was clear that there were certain things that we could do to avoid getting sick. There were emperors that would ban kissing among their people, because they thought that wasn't a privilege people should have. The one thing you can count on that we’ve seen over and over again, is despite proclamations where it was banned, despite disease and plague, it always comes back!

Les humains auraient peut-être eu besoin de se rapprocher beaucoup plus l'un de l'autre pour humer une bonne odeur. C'est ainsi que nous avons commencé à nous embrasser. Mais pourquoi certaines cultures ne s'embrassent-elles pas ? et nous embrasserons nous toujours? Nous avons vu le baiser apparaître et disparaître dans le monde entier pour différentes raisons. Pour les maladies même avant que nous ne connaissions la théorie des germes/ microbes, il était clair qu'il y avait certaines choses que nous pouvions faire pour éviter de tomber malade. Certains empereurs interdisaient à leur peuple de s'embrasser, car ils pensaient que ce n'était pas un privilège que les gens devaient avoir. La seule chose sur laquelle vous pouvez compter et que nous avons vue encore et encore, c'est que malgré les proclamations là où c'était interdit, malgré les maladies et la peste il revient toujours.
Parfait, Magie, MERCI !

Un grand merci et BRAVO à vous deux. Vous vous êtes très bien sortis de la réelle difficulté de cette traduction !





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