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Rack your brains and Help!/57

Cours gratuits > Forum > Exercices du forum || En bas

[POSTER UNE NOUVELLE REPONSE] [Suivre ce sujet]


Rack your brains and Help!/57
Message de here4u posté le 28-10-2019 à 14:18:07 (S | E | F)
Hello Dear Friends!

Mon élève a entendu une très ancienne chanson qui fait partie des "classiques" et de l'Histoire des Etats-Unis ... Il a cherché et trouvé de quoi vous parler de ce choc qu'il a reçu et de vous rappeler les circonstances de la parution de cette chanson ...
Un peu d'Histoire et de civilisation à la fois ... Il a fait ce qu'il peut côté grammaire, mais a quand même fait qulques fautes ... Merci de l'aider !
Cet exercice est un et sa correction sera online à partir du Dimanche 10 novembre, tard.

Please, help my Student! Ce texte contient 15 fautes à corriger ! (en majuscules !)
There are 15 mistakes in this text...


“Can you imagine never having heard this song before and realising what is the strange fruit hanging from the poplar tree? That’s something that unfolds in the time of listening, so that image of bulging eyes and twisted mouth jumps out at the listener.” a song that still shocks 80 years after it was first performed.
On 20 April 1939, the jazz singer Billie Holiday stepped into a studio with eight pieces band to record « Strange Fruit ». This jarring song about horrors of lynching was not only Holiday’s biggest hit, but it would become one of the most influential protest song of the 20th Century – continuing to speak to us about racial violence today. It was named the song of the century by Time magazine in 1999, and the story of Strange Fruit’s conception has entered into legend. Originally a poem called « Bitter Fruit », in response to lynching in the US Southern states.///END OF PART 1 /// “I wrote « Strange Fruit » because I hate lynching, and I hate injustice, and I hate the people who perpetuate it.”
To ensure that the song was indeed savoured, specific conditions were created for the performances. It would be the lattest song in the set, there would be an absolute silence, no bar service and the lights would be dimmed saving a single spotlight on Holiday’s face. As it was said, “People had to remember « Strange Fruit », get their insides burnt with it.”
What happened on the first night Holiday performed « Strange Fruit » at Café Society foreshadowed the response it will get when released as a record. “The first time I sang it I thought it was a mistake… there wasn’t even a spatter of applause when I finished. Then a lone person began to clap nervously. Then suddenly everyone was clapping,” said Holiday. To hear Holiday sing of “the sudden smell of burning flesh” minutes after her jazz ballads was unquieting. Afterwards, Holiday witnessed a range of reactions, from tears to walkouts and racist hecklers.///END OF PART 2 /// Radio stations in US and abroad blacklisted it and Holiday’s label, Columbia Records, refused to record it. When she toured the song, some proprietors tried to discourage her from singing it for fear of alienating or angering their bosses.
What is so remarkable about « Strange Fruit » is how an indelible mark it made on American society so soon after its release. “It will, even after the tenth hearing, make you blink and hold onto your chair. Even now, as I think of it, the short hair on the back of my neck tightens and I want to hit somebody. And I think I know who.”.
In 2002, Strange Fruit was added to the National Registry of the Library of Congress, immortalising it as a song of great significance to the musical heritage of the US. Holiday died in 1959 – but its capacity to shock has never waned. It has inspired musicians since a song can be a timefree impetus for social change./// END OF PART 3 ///

Lien internet


Give me YOUR BEST, I give you THE FORCE!




Réponse : Rack your brains and Help!/57 de chocolatcitron, postée le 29-10-2019 à 04:33:12 (S | E)
Rack your brains and Help!/57
Message de here4u posté le 28-10-2019 à 14:18:07 (S | E | F) Dimanche 10 novembre, tard.

Hello my dear Here4u ! FINISHED !

Mon élève a entendu une très ancienne chanson qui fait partie des "classiques" et de l'Histoire des Etats-Unis ... Il a cherché et trouvé de quoi vous parler de ce choc qu'il a reçu et de vous rappeler les circonstances de la parution de cette chanson ...

Je me porte volontaire pour traduire la première partie de ce texte !

Here is my work:
“Can you imagine never having heard this song before and realising what the strange fruit hanging from the poplar (1) TREES (2) IS? That’s something that unfolds in the time of listening, so that image of bulging eyes and twisted mouth jumps out at the listener.” a song that still shocks 80 years after it was first performed.
On 20 April 1939, the jazz singer Billie Holiday stepped into a studio with (3) AN (4) EIGHT-PIECE band to record « Strange Fruit ». This jarring song about THE horrors of lynching was not only Holiday’s biggest hit, but it would become one of the most influential protest (5) SONGS of the 20th Century – continuing to speak to us about racial violence today. It was named the song of the century by Time magazine in 1999, and the story of Strange Fruit’s conception has entered (6) THE legend. Originally a poem called « Bitter Fruit », in response to lynching in the US Southern states.///END OF PART 1 /// “I wrote « Strange Fruit » because I hate lynching, and I hate injustice, and I hate the people who perpetuate it.”
To ensure that the song was indeed savoured, specific conditions were created for the performances. It would be the (7) LATEST song in the set, there would be an absolute silence, no bar service and the lights would be dimmed (8) SAVE (9) FOR a single spotlight on Holiday’s face. As it was said, “People had to remember « Strange Fruit », get their insides burnt with it.”
What happened on the first night Holiday performed « Strange Fruit » at Café Society foreshadowed the response it (10)WOULD get when released as a record. “The first time I sang it I thought it was a mistake… there wasn’t even a (11) PATTER of applause when I finished. Then a lone person began to clap nervously. Then suddenly everyone was clapping,” said Holiday. To hear Holiday sing of “the sudden smell of burning flesh” minutes after her jazz ballads was (12) DISQUIETING. Afterwards, Holiday witnessed a range of reactions, from tears to walkouts and racist hecklers.///END OF PART 2 /// Radio stations in (13) THE US and abroad blacklisted it and Holiday’s label, Columbia Records, refused to record it. When she toured the song, some proprietors tried to DISCOURAGING discourage her from singing it for fear of alienating or angering their bosses. What is so remarkable about « Strange Fruit » is how indelible (14) A mark it made on American society so soon after its release. “It will, even after the tenth hearing, make you blink and hold onto your chair. Even now, as I think of it, the short hair on the back of my neck tightens and I want to hit somebody. And I think I know who.”.
In 2002, « Strange Fruit » was added to the National Registry of the Library of Congress, immortalising it as a song of great significance to the musical heritage of the US. Holiday died in 1959 – but its capacity to shock has never waned. It has inspired musicians since a song can be a (15) TIMELESS impetus for social change./// END OF PART 3 ///


Give me YOUR BEST, I give you THE FORCE!

Thanks for this dark american historic topic.
I did my very best.
I send you the force back to you for marking. Have a great week!
See you soon.



Réponse : Rack your brains and Help!/57 de taiji43, postée le 30-10-2019 à 16:34:02 (S | E)
ello HERE4U and everybody
After an amazing eighteen-day trip in the USA and a serious bronchitis on my return to France ; here I am again and here is my correction
Thank you very much for the correction
READY TO BE CORRECTED
Je traduirai la deuxième partie

Rack your brains and Help!/57

“Can you imagine never HEARING this song before and realising what the strange fruit hanging from the poplar tree IS ? That’s something that unfolds in the time of listening, so that image of bulging eyes and twisted mouth jumps out at the listener.” a song that still shocks 80 years after it was first performed.

On 20 April 1939, the jazz singer Billie Holiday stepped into a studio with EIGHT-PIECE band to record « Strange Fruit ».

This jarring song about horrors of lynching was not only Holiday’s biggest hit, but it would become one of the most influential protest SONGS of the 20th Century

– continuing to speak to us about racial violence today. It was named the song of the century by Time magazine in 1999, and the story of Strange Fruit’s conception has entered into legend. Originally a poem called « Bitter Fruit », in response to lynching in the SOUTHERN US states.

///END OF PART 1 /// “I wrote « Strange Fruit » because I hate lynching, and I hate injustice, and I hate the people who perpetuate it.”

To ensure that the song was indeed savoured, specific conditions were created for the performances. It would be the lattest song in the set, there would be an absolute silence, no bar service and the lights would be dimmed saving a single spotlight on Holiday’s face. As it was said, “People had to remember « Strange Fruit », get their insides burnt with it.”

What happened on the first night Holiday performed « Strange Fruit » at Café Society foreshadowed the response it WOULD get when released as a record. “The first time I sang it I thought it was a mistake…

there wasn’t even a spatter of applause when I finished. Then a lone person began to clap nervously. Then suddenly everyone was clapping,” said Holiday.

To hear Holiday sing of “the sudden smell of burning flesh” minutes after her jazz ballads was DISQUIETING Afterwards, Holiday witnessed a range of reactions, from tears to walkouts and racist hecklers.

///END OF PART 2 /// Radio stations in US and abroad blacklisted it and Holiday’s label, Columbia Records, refused to record it.

When she toured the song, some proprietors tried DICOURAGING her from singing it for fear of alienating or angering their bosses.

What is so remarkable about « Strange Fruit » is how INDELIBLE mark it made on American society so soon after its release.

“It will, even after the tenth hearing, make you blink and hold onto your chair.

Even now, as I think of it, the short hair on the back of my neck tightens and I want to hit somebody. And I think I know who.”.

In 2002, Strange Fruit was added to the National Registry of the Library of Congress, immortalising it as a song of great significance to the musical heritage of the US. Holiday died in 1959 – but its capacity to shock has never WANING. It has inspired musicians since a song can be a( timefree )TIMELESS ??? impetus for social change./// END OF PART 3 /// 10 sur 15 , je suis loin des 15 fautes à trouver

-------------------
Modifié par lucile83 le 30-10-2019 17:59
Bug couleur réparé



Réponse : Rack your brains and Help!/57 de magie8, postée le 31-10-2019 à 17:07:29 (S | E)
bonjour BON POUR CORRECTION

Please, help my Student! Ce texte contient 15 fautes à corriger ! (en majuscules !)
There are 15 mistakes in this text...


“Can you imagine never having heard this song before and realising what the strange fruit hanging from the poplar treeS IS? That’s something that unfolds in the time of listening, so that image of bulging eyes and twisted mouth jumps out at the listener.” a song that still shocks 80 years after it was first performed.
On 20 April 1939, the jazz singer Billie Holiday stepped into a studio with AN EIGHT-PIECE band to record « Strange Fruit ». This jarring song about horrors of lynching was not only Holiday’s biggest hit, but it would become one of the most influential protest song of the 20th Century – continuing to speak to us about racial violence today. It was named the song of the century by Time magazine in 1999, and the story of Strange Fruit’s conception has entered into legend. Originally a poem called « Bitter Fruit », in response to lynching in the US Southern states.///END OF PART 1 /// “I wrote « Strange Fruit » because I hate lynching, and I hate injustice, and I hate the people who perpetuate it.”
To ensure that the song was indeed savoured, specific conditions were created for the performances. It would be the LAST song in the set, there would be( pas an ) absolute silence, no bar service and the lights would be dimmed SAVE FOR a single spotlight on Holiday’s face. As it was said, “People had to remember « Strange Fruit », get their insides burnt with it.”
What happened on the first night Holiday performed « Strange Fruit » at Café Society foreshadowed the response it WOULD get when released as a record. “The first time I sang it I thought it was a mistake… there wasn’t even a PATTER of applause when I finished. Then a lone person began to clap nervously. Then suddenly everyone was clapping,” said Holiday. To hear Holiday sing of “the sudden smell of burning flesh” minutes after her jazz ballads was DISquieting. Afterwards, Holiday witnessed a range of reactions, from tears to walkouts and racist hecklers.///END OF PART 2 /// Radio stations in THE US and abroad blacklisted it and Holiday’s label, Columbia Records, refused to record it. When she toured the song, some proprietors tried (PAS TO ) discouragING her from singing it for fear of alienating or angering their bosses.
What is so remarkable about « Strange Fruit » is how ( PAS AN) indelible A mark it made on American society so soon after its release. “It will, even after the tenth hearing, make you blink and hold onto your chair. Even now, as I think of it, the short hair on the back of my neck tightens and I want to hit somebody. And I think I know who.”.
In 2002, Strange Fruit was added to the National Registry of the Library of Congress, immortalising it as a song of great significance to the musical heritage of the US. Holiday died in 1959 – but its capacity to shock never wanING. It has inspired musicians since a song can be a timeLESS impetus for social change./// END OF PART 3 ///




Réponse : Rack your brains and Help!/57 de alpiem, postée le 01-11-2019 à 15:06:13 (S | E)
Rack your brains and Help!/57
15 fautes à corriger DONE WITH IT


"Can you imagine never having heard this song before and realising what is the strange fruit hanging from the poplar tree?
That's something that unfolds in the time of listening, so that THE image of bulging eyes and twisted mouth jumps out at the listener.? a song that still shocks 80 years after it was first performed.

On THE 20TH OF April 1939, the jazz singer Billie Holiday stepped into a studio with UN EIGHT-PEACES band to record « Strange Fruit ».
This jarring song about horrors of lynching was not only THE Holiday's biggest hit, but it would become one of the most influential protest song of the 20th Century ? continuing to speak to us about racial violence today.
It was named the song of the century by Time magazine in 1999, and the story of Strange Fruit's conception has entered into legend.
Originally a poem called « Bitter Fruit », in response to lynching in the US Southern states.///END OF PART 1 /// ?I wrote « Strange Fruit » because I hate lynching, and I hate injustice, and I hate the people who PERPETRATED it.?
IN ORDER TO ensure that the song was indeed savoured, specific conditions were created for the performances.
It would be the lattest song in the set, there would be an absolute silence, no bar service and the lights would be dimmed saving a single spotlight on Holiday's face.
As it was said, ?"People had to RECALL « Strange Fruit » HAD GOT their insides burnING with it.?
What happened on the first night Holiday performed « Strange Fruit » at Café Society foreshadowed the response it will get when released as a record.
?The first time I sang it I thought it was a mistake? there wasn't even a spatter of applause when I finished. Then a lone person began to clap nervously.
Then suddenly everyone was clapping,? said Holiday. To hear Holiday sing of ?the sudden smell of burning flesh? minutes after her jazz ballads was DISquieting.
Afterwards, Holiday witnessed a range of reactions, from tears to walkouts and racist hecklers.///END OF PART 2 /// Radio stations in THE US and abroad blacklisted it and Holiday's label, Columbia Records, refused to record it.
When she toured the song, some proprietors tried to discourage her from singing it for fear of alienating or angering their bosses.

What is so remarkable about « Strange Fruit » is HOW indelible A mark it made (or WHAT INDELIBLE MARK IT MADE)on American society so soon after its release.
?It will, even after the tenth hearing, make you blink and hold onto your chair.
Even now, as I think of it, the short hair on the back of my neck tightens and I want to hit somebody. And I think I know who.?.
In 2002, Strange Fruit was added to the National Registry of the Library of Congress, immortalising it as a song of great significance to the musical heritage of the US.
Holiday died in 1959 ? but its capacity to shock has never waned. It has inspired musicians SO MUCH SO THAT A song can be a timeLESS impetus for social change./// END OF PART 3 ///



Réponse : Rack your brains and Help!/57 de maxwell, postée le 01-11-2019 à 18:42:09 (S | E)
READY TO BE CORRECTED
Je traduirai la 3e partie. En tout cas, je ferai de mon mieux


Hello Here4U
Thanks a lot for this very difficult exercise, with a lot of difficult vocabulary : I did what I could and I'm not sure of a few parts

“Can you imagine never having heard this song before and realising what [] the strange fruit hanging from the poplar tree IS? That’s something that unfolds in the time of listening, WHILE that image of bulging eyes and twisted mouth IS JUMPING out at the listener.” a song that still shocks 80 years after it was first performed.On 20 April 1939, the jazz singer Billie Holiday stepped into a studio with AN eight-PIECE band to record « Strange Fruit ». This jarring song about horrors of lynching was not only Holiday’s biggest hit, but it would become one of the most influential protest song of the 20th Century – continuing to speak to us about racial violence today. It was named the song of the century by Time magazine in 1999, and the story of Strange Fruit’s conception has entered THE legend.Originally a poem called « Bitter Fruit », in response to lynching in the US Southern states.///END OF PART 1 /// “I wrote « Strange Fruit » because I hate lynching, and I hate injustice, and I hate the people who perpetuate it.”
To ensure that the song was indeed savoured, specific conditions were created for the performances. It would be the LAST song in the set, there would be an absolute silence, no bar service and the lights would be dimmed saving a single spotlight on Holiday’s face. As it HAD BEEN said, “People had to remember « Strange Fruit », get their insides burnt with it.”
What happened on the first night Holiday performed « Strange Fruit » at Café Society foreshadowed the response it WOULD get when released as a record. “The first time I sang it I thought it was a mistake… there wasn’t even a spatter of applause when I finished. Then a SINGLE person began to clap nervously. Then suddenly everyone was clapping,” said Holiday. HEARING Holiday sing of “the sudden smell of burning flesh” minutes after her jazz ballads was DISQUIETING. Afterwards, Holiday witnessed a range of reactions, from tears to walkouts and racist hecklers.///END OF PART 2 /// Radio stations in THE USA and abroad blacklisted it and Holiday’s label, Columbia Records, refused to record it. When she toured the song, some proprietors tried to discourage her from singing it for fear of alienating or angering their bosses.
What is so remarkable about « Strange Fruit » is how  IT MADE an indelible mark on American society so soon after its release. “It will, even after the tenth hearing, make you blink and hold onto your chair. Even now, as I think of it, the short hair on the back of my neck tightens and I want to hit somebody. And I think I know who.”.
In 2002, Strange Fruit was added to the National Registry of the Library of Congress, immortalising it as a song of great significance to the musical heritage of the US. Holiday died in 1959 – but its (*) capacity to shock has never waned. It has inspired musicians since a song can be a TIMELESS impetus for social change./// END OF PART 3 ///

(*) or : HER SONG'S



Réponse : Rack your brains and Help!/57 de here4u, postée le 08-11-2019 à 11:26:50 (S | E)
Hello!

Le temps passe ... J'ai commencé à poster les corrections ...
Wakey wakey, last minute posters...



Réponse : Rack your brains and Help!/57 de joe39, postée le 08-11-2019 à 12:04:19 (S | E)
Hello dear here4u,
Please find hereunder my try, ready to be corrected

“Can you imagine never having heard this song before and realising what is the strange fruit hanging from the poplar tree? That’s something that unfolds in the time of listening, so that image of bulging eyes and twisted mouth jumps out at the listener.” a song that IS still SHOCKING 80 years after BEING first performed.
On 20 April 1939, the jazz singer Billie Holiday stepped into a studio with EIGHT-PIECE band to record « Strange Fruit ». This jarring song about horrors of lynching was not only Holiday’s biggest hit, but it would become one of the most influential protest SONGS of the 20th Century – continuing to speak to us about racial violence EVEN today. It was named the song of the century by Time magazine in 1999, and the story of Strange Fruit’s conception has ENTERED THE LEGEND. Originally a poem called « Bitter Fruit », in response to lynching in the US Southern states.///END OF PART 1 /// “I wrote « Strange Fruit » because I hate lynching, and I hate injustice, and I hate the people who perpetuate it.”
To ensure that the song was indeed SAVORED, specific conditions were created for the performances. It would be the LATEST song in the set, there would be an absolute silence, no bar service and the lights would be dimmed saving a single spotlight on Holiday’s face. As it was said, “People had to remember « Strange Fruit », get their insides burnt with it.”
What happened on the first night Holiday performed « Strange Fruit » at Café Society foreshadowed the response it will get when released as a record. “The first time I sang it I thought it was a mistake… there wasn’t even a spatter of applause when I finished. Then a lone person began to clap nervously. Then suddenly everyone was clapping,” said Holiday. To hear Holiday sing of “the sudden smell of burning flesh” minutes after her jazz ballads was DISQUIETING. Afterwards, Holiday witnessed a range of reactions, from tears to walkouts and racist hecklers ///END OF PART 2 /// Radio stations in THE US and abroad blacklisted it and Holiday’s label, Columbia Records, refused to record it. When she toured the song, some PATRONS tried to discourage her from singing it for fear of alienating or angering their bosses.
What is so remarkable about « Strange Fruit » is THAT (an) indelible mark it STUCK on American society so soon after its release. “It will, even after the tenth hearing, make you blink and hold onto your chair. Even now, as I think of it, the short hair on the back of my neck tightens and I want to hit somebody. And I think I know who.”.
In 2002, Strange Fruit was added to the National Registry of the Library of Congress, IMMORTALIZING it as a song of great significance to the musical heritage of the US. Holiday died in 1959 – but its capacity to shock has never waned. It has inspired musicians since a song can be a TIMELESS impetus for social change./// END OF PART 3 ///

Thanking you very much, I wish you a great weekend.
So long
Joe39



Réponse : Rack your brains and Help!/57 de here4u, postée le 10-11-2019 à 23:20:52 (S | E)
Hello Dears...

Je dois être, aujourd'hui, plus fatiguée que je le pensais car je viens, à nouveau, de perdre mon deuxième devoir de la journée ... Il faut le faire, quand même !

Bon, c'est reparti ... Je vous félicitais tous du très bon travail fourni et d'avoir déjoué presque tous les "pièges" tendus ...
Merci également d'avoir déjà postulé pour le "Follow-up work" ... J'ai mes trois volontaires ... mais si d'autres personnes voulaient aussi faire ce travail, les doublons ne me gênent pas et, seront corrigés ici, en live.

“Can you imagine never having heard this song before and realising what the strange fruit hanging from the poplar tree is (1)? That’s something that unfolds in the time of listening, so that the image of bulging eyes (2) and twisted mouth jumps out at the listener.” a song that still shocks 80 years after it was first performed.
On 20 April 1939, the jazz singer Billie Holiday stepped into a studio with an eight-piece band(3) to record «Strange Fruit». This jarring song about the horrors of (2) lynching was not only Holiday’s biggest hit, but it would become one of the most influential protest songs (4) of the 20th Century – continuing to speak to us about racial violence today. It was named the song of the century by Time magazine in 1999, and the story of Strange Fruit’s conception has entered legend. Originally a poem called «Bitter Fruit», in response to lynching in the US Southern states.(5) “I wrote «Strange Fruit» because I hate lynching, and I hate injustice, and I hate the people who perpetuate it.”
To ensure that the song was indeed savoured, specific conditions were created for the performances. It would be the last song (6) in the set, there would be (7) absolute silence, no bar service and the lights would be dimmed save for (8) a single spotlight on Holiday’s face. As it was said, “People had to remember «Strange Fruit», get their insides burnt with it.”
What happened on the first night Holiday performed «Strange Fruit» at Café Society foreshadowed the response it would get (9) when released as a record. “The first time I sang it I thought it was a mistake… there wasn’t even a patter of applause(10) when I finished. Then a lone person began to clap nervously. Then suddenly everyone was clapping,” said Holiday. To hear Holiday sing of “the sudden smell of burning flesh” minutes after her jazz ballads was disquieting.(11) Afterwards, Holiday witnessed a range of reactions, from tears to walkouts and racist hecklers. Radio stations in the US (12) and abroad blacklisted it and Holiday’s label, Columbia Records, refused to record it. When she toured the song, some proprietors tried to discourage her from singing it for fear of alienating or angering their patrons.(13)
What is so remarkable about «Strange Fruit» is how indelible a mark (14) it made on American society so soon after its release. “It will, even after the tenth hearing, make you blink and hold onto your chair. Even now, as I think of it, the short hair on the back of my neck tightens and I want to hit somebody. And I think I know who.”.
In 2002, Strange Fruit was added to the National Registry of the Library of Congress, immortalising it as a song of great significance to the musical heritage of the US.(12) . Holiday died in 1959 – but its capacity to shock has never waned. It has inspired musicians since a song can be a timeless(15) impetus for social change.


(1) «... what the strange fruit hanging from the poplar tree is?»: La phrase commençait par «Can you imagine…? »= forme interrogative directe. Cependant, il s’agissait ici de bien noter que la suite de la phrase était une interrogative indirecte. En conséquence, le verbe (être) doit suivre le sujet (the poplar tree), l’inversion sujet-verbe ne se faisant pas à la forme interrogative indirecte. ATTENTION ! Le point d’interrogation final est obligatoire car il est lié à l’interrogation directe initiale.
(2) * the/ this/ that image of bulging eyes… Image est ici déterminée par le groupe nominal introduit par «of».
Même remarque et même conséquence pour «the horrors of lynching»: ce ne sont pas les horreurs en général, mais celles, particulières, déterminées par «of»=> lynching.
(3) «with an eight-piece band» is a band which has eight «pieces». Vous avez ici, encore une fois, un adjectif composé ; le nom "pieces", est en position d'adjectif et reste invariable.
(4) «become one of the most influential protest songs»: Dès que vous avez «one of the…», le nom qui suit est FORCEMENT au pluriel.
(5) US Southern states: fait référence à une région précise et devrait, normalement, avoir une majuscule. Cependant, elle n’y était pas dans le texte original … Lien internet

(6) Ne pas confondre «latest»= dernier dans le temps, le plus récent, (qui peut être suivi d'autres …) et last= qui ne sera pas suivi … Ici, la chanson était the «last one» dès la première interprétation, et le sera à toutes les autres. "It would be the last song in the set."
(7) «there would be absolute silence» ici indénombrable (sans article).
(8) «save for»= except for
(9) «foreshadowed the response it would get…»: tous les verbes du début de la phrase sont au prétérit, donc, l’auxiliaire du «futur» devient «would», conditionnel.
(10) Ne pas confondre «spatter»: Lien internet
(dont le sens ne convenait pas ici…) et «patter»: Lien internet
. Une seule lettre peut tout changer … La vie est dure !
(11) «unquieting» n’existe pas … => «disquieting.»
(12) The US: les pays formés de plusieurs états prennent l’article défini (the USA/ the Netherlands/ the (former) USSR/)
(13) «some proprietors tried to discourage her from singing it for fear of alienating or angering their patrons.» The proprietors – or owners - have «patrons» = clients. Lien internet
Vous avez senti que «bosses» était « étrange », mais mon «Poor Student» fait bien de raccourcis et il faut s'attendre à (presque) tout avec lui !
(14) «how indelible a mark it made!» est la forme correcte de la construction de «HOW» + nom ; c'était la construction la plus difficile du texte. Si cette formulation vous semble trop compliquée, utilisez «What an indelible mark it made!»
(15) «timefree» ne convenait pas (n’existe pas !) … => timeless


Bravo, donc, à tous ... Il n'est pas "tard", mais je tombe de sommeil ... J'espère ne pas avoir refait trop de typos ...
Je vous donne les paroles de cette chanson si terrible, et pourtant aussi si poétique où l'on sent bien le Sud des Etats Unis et toute sa beauté ...

Southern trees bear strange fruit
Blood on the leaves and blood at the root
Black bodies swinging in the southern breeze
Strange fruit hanging from poplar trees


Pastoral scene of the gallant South
The bulging eyes and the twisted mouth
Scent of magnolia sweet and fresh
Then the sudden smell of burning flesh

Here is a fruit for the crows to pluck
For the rain to gather, for the wind to suck
For the sun to ripe, for the tree to drop
Here is a strange and bitter crop !

Encore BRAVO à tous !





Réponse : Rack your brains and Help!/57 de maxwell, postée le 11-11-2019 à 08:24:53 (S | E)
FINISHED
Hello Here's my contribution:
Follow-up : Part III

Radio stations in THE USA and abroad blacklisted it and Holiday’s label, Columbia Records, refused to record it. When she toured the song, some proprietors tried to discourage her from singing it for fear of alienating or angering their patrons.
What is so remarkable about « Strange Fruit » is how indelible a mark it made on American society so soon after its release. “It will, even after the tenth hearing, make you blink and hold onto your chair. Even now, as I think of it, the short hair on the back of my neck tightens and I want to hit somebody. And I think I know who.”.
In 2002, Strange Fruit was added to the National Registry of the Library of Congress, immortalising it as a song of great significance to the musical heritage of the US. Holiday died in 1959 – but its capacity to shock has never waned. It has inspired musicians since a song can be a timeless impetus for social change

Les stations de radio aux Etats-unis et à l'étranger la mirent sur la liste noire(*) et le label d'Holiday, Columbia Records, refusa de l'enregistrer. Quand elle interpréta la chanson en tournée, des propriétaires tentèrent de la dissuader de la chanter de peur de s'aliéner ou de mettre en colère leurs clients. Ce qui est si remarquable au sujet de "Fruits étranges" c'est la façon dont elle a imprimé une marque si indélébile sur la société américaine en si peu de temps après sa sortie. "Elle vous fera, même après la dixième écoute, ciller et vous accrocher à votre chaise. Même maintenant, alors que j'y pense, les poils sur ma nuque se hérissent et j'ai envie de frapper quelqu'un. Et je crois savoir qui."
En 2002, Fruits étranges fut ajouté au registre national de la bibliothèque du Congrès l'immortalisant en tant que chanson d'une grande importance pour l'héritage musical des Etats-Unis. Holiday nous a quittée en 1959 mais la capacité de sa chanson à choquer n'a jamais décliné. Elle a inspiré des musiciens car une chanson peut donner un élan éternel vers des changements sociaux.
(*) ça me démange de dire tout simplement blacklistèrent

finalement, on peut dire "has entered legend " et "has entered the legend" ?

spatter of applause existe bien dans le même sens : quelques rares applaudisseents : Lien internet




Réponse : Rack your brains and Help!/57 de here4u, postée le 11-11-2019 à 11:21:00 (S | E)
Hello, dear Friends,

Voici votre Follow up Work! Merci à nos volontaires ...

“Can you imagine never having heard this song before and realising what the strange fruit hanging from the poplar tree is (1)? That’s something that unfolds in the time of listening, so that the image of bulging eyes (2) and twisted mouth jumps out at the listener.” a song that still shocks 80 years after it was first performed.
On 20 April 1939, the jazz singer Billie Holiday stepped into a studio with an eight-piece band(3) to record «Strange Fruit». This jarring song about the horrors of (2) lynching was not only Holiday’s biggest hit, but it would become one of the most influential protest songs (4) of the 20th Century – continuing to speak to us about racial violence today. It was named the song of the century by Time magazine in 1999, and the story of Strange Fruit’s conception has entered legend. Originally a poem called «Bitter Fruit», in response to lynching in the US Southern states.(5)

TRANSLATION PART 1

“I wrote «Strange Fruit» because I hate lynching, and I hate injustice, and I hate the people who perpetuate it.”
To ensure that the song was indeed savoured, specific conditions were created for the performances. It would be the last song (6) in the set, there would be (7) absolute silence, no bar service and the lights would be dimmed save for (8) a single spotlight on Holiday’s face. As it was said, “People had to remember «Strange Fruit», get their insides burnt with it.”
What happened on the first night Holiday performed «Strange Fruit» at Café Society foreshadowed the response it would get (9) when released as a record. “The first time I sang it I thought it was a mistake… there wasn’t even a patter/ spatter * of applause(10) when I finished. Then a lone person began to clap nervously. Then suddenly everyone was clapping,” said Holiday. To hear Holiday sing of “the sudden smell of burning flesh” minutes after her jazz ballads was disquieting.(11) Afterwards, Holiday witnessed a range of reactions, from tears to walkouts and racist hecklers.
Hurrah! Mon Elève est content ... Il a fait une faute de moins !

TRANSLATION PART 2

Radio stations in the US and abroad blacklisted it and Holiday’s label, Columbia Records, refused to record it. When she toured the song, some proprietors tried to discourage her from singing it for fear of alienating or angering their patrons.
What is so remarkable about «Strange Fruit» is how indelible a mark it made on American society so soon after its release. “It will, even after the tenth hearing, make you blink and hold onto your chair. Even now, as I think of it, the short hair on the back of my neck tightens and I want to hit somebody. And I think I know who.”.
In 2002, Strange Fruit was added to the National Registry of the Library of Congress, immortalising it as a song of great significance to the musical heritage of the US. Holiday died in 1959 – but its capacity to shock has never waned. It has inspired musicians since a song can be a timeless impetus for social change.

Les stations de radio aux Etats-unis et à l'étranger la mirent sur la liste noire et la maison de disques d'Holiday, Columbia Records, refusa de l'enregistrer. Quand elle interpréta la chanson en tournée, des propriétaires tentèrent de la dissuader de la chanter de peur de s'aliéner ou de mettre en colère leurs clients. Ce qui est si remarquable au sujet de "Fruits étranges" c'est la façon dont elle a imprimé une marque si indélébile sur la société américaine en si peu de temps après sa sortie. " Même après la dixième écoute, cette chanson vous fera sourciller et vous accrocher à votre chaise. Même maintenant, rien que d'y penser, les poils se hérissent sur ma nuque et j'ai envie de frapper quelqu'un. Et je crois savoir qui ..."
En 2002, "Fruits étranges" fut ajouté au registre national de la bibliothèque du Congrès l'immortalisant en tant que chanson d'une grande importance pour l'héritage musical des Etats-Unis. Holiday nous a quittés en 1959 mais la capacité de sa chanson à choquer n'a jamais décliné. Elle a inspiré des musiciens car une chanson peut donner un élan éternel vers des changements sociaux.

finalement, on peut dire "has entered legend " et "has entered the legend"? Oui ! Tout dépend si tu entends "legend" sur le plan général, ou sur le plan de "la légende précise de cette période ou de cet événement !" )
Grand merci, Maxwell!





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