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Rack your brains and help!/60

Cours gratuits > Forum > Exercices du forum || En bas

[POSTER UNE NOUVELLE REPONSE] [Suivre ce sujet]


Rack your brains and help!/60
Message de here4u posté le 11-12-2019 à 13:39:58 (S | E | F)
Hello, dear Hardworkers,

No strike here, the "Show must go on", Work and Fun MUST go on!
Je sais que vous attendez tous votre texte, qui est toujours aussi "improbable" que d'habitude ! Mon élève a fait tout son possible, mais il a tout de même laissé passer 16 fautes ...
Les différentes parties sont indiquées pour le Follow Up Work, mais je pense qu'il est tout de même mieux d'attendre la correction ...
Ce texte est un et la correction sera en ligne le Mercredi 25 décembre dans la journée ... JOYEUSES TES à vous tous.

PLEASE, HELP my STUDENT! Ce texte contient de nombreuses fautes à corriger - en majuscules - Merci.

Why painting zebra stripes on cows could help saving the Japanese agricultural industry.
An experiment on a herd of cows in central Japan appears to have proved a radical, naturally-inspired solution to a pester problem that plagues the agricultural industry.
Zebras and their gaudy coats have long intrigued scientifists, spawning a raft of theories about how and why few equine species developed stripes. The consensus finally settled around a single answer: the zigzag pattern was an evolutionary response to bite insects, especially carers for deadly diseases. Insects, it seems, have a harder time landing on striped surfaces than solid-colored ones.
A question: if it works for wild horses in Africa, why not cows in a Japanese pasture? Together with colleagues at Kyoto University, it was decided to run an experience on a herd of Japanese black cattle.///END of PART 1 ///
Using water-based spray paint, one group of cows was given a fresh coat of white stripes, about two-inch-wide, each morning. A second group got black stripes, and a third, the control group, went paint-free.
Researchers then sat up and watched as the flies descended, photographying the animals for 30-minute intervals and capturing sample insects with glue straps. Staff observed how frequently the cows did what cows do to ward off airborne blood-sucking pesters: shook their head, flicked their nail and skin-twitched.
The white-striped animals, looking for everyone like a bovine chain gang, were no small source of barnyard mirth.
"People thought it was some kind of joke," someone told a Japan's TV network. But the results of going zebra were undeniable. ///END of PART 2 ///
The white-striped cows sustained only half so much bug attacks than either of the other groups.(Paint fumes apparently were not enough to deter flies, since black-striped cows were bitten just as often as the control group.) Animals protected by their white stripes were also less stressed, exhibiting fewer head shakes, foot stomping, and other insect-avoidant behavior.
In a report published in an online journal, the Japanese scientists said the results suggest a promising, pesticide-free alternative to protecting livestock of biting flies - a menace which, according to one U.S. study, costs the beef and dairy industry more than $2 billion annually.
Serious economical implications aside, online reaction in Japan was emphatically positive. "What about a spider web pattern? That would really throw off the bugs," wrote one. "When are we getting zebra clothes for humans?" another one commented.///END of TEXT///

Funny!? but if it's working... why not? I give you the FORCE.


-------------------
Modifié par lucile83 le 11-12-2019 13:51
Le numéro de Rack your brains est passé de 70 à 60



Réponse : Rack your brains and help!/60 de here4u, postée le 13-12-2019 à 11:30:26 (S | E)
Lucile !
... mais "quand on aime, on ne compte pas ..."



Réponse : Rack your brains and help!/60 de maxwell, postée le 15-12-2019 à 18:18:29 (S | E)
READY TO BE CORRECTED
Hello Here4U

I hope I'm not going to make a fool of myself this time . Help my student is the most difficult exercise, that's why we need it so much. Thanks again
No colors this time

Help my student:
Why painting zebra stripes on cows could help SAVE the Japanese agricultural industry.
An experiment on a herd of cows in central Japan appears to have PROVEN a radical, naturally-inspired solution to a PESTERING problem that plagues the agricultural industry.
Zebras and their gaudy coats have long intrigued SCIENTISTS, spawning a raft of theories about how and why few equine species developed stripes. The consensus finally settled ON a single answer: the zigzag pattern was an evolutionary response to BITING insects, especially THOSE CARRIERS OF deadly diseases. Insects, it seems, have a harder time landing on striped surfaces than solid-colored ones.
A question: if it works for wild horses in Africa, why not cows in a Japanese pasture? Together with colleagues at Kyoto University, it was decided to run an EXPERIMENT on a herd of Japanese black cattle.

Using water-based spray paint, one group of cows was given a fresh coat of white stripes, about TWO INCHES wide, each morning. A second group got black stripes, and a third, the control group, went paint-free (*).
Researchers then sat up and watched as the flies descended, PHOTOGRAPHING the animals for 30-minute intervals and capturing sample insects with glue straps. Staff observed how frequently the cows did what cows do to ward off airborne blood-sucking STALKERS: SHAKING their HEADS, FLICKING their NAILS and SKIN-TWITCHING.
The white-striped animals, looking TO everyone like a bovine chain gang, were no small source of barnyard mirth.
"People thought it was some kind of joke," someone told a Japan's TV network. But the results of going zebra were undeniable.


The white-striped cows sustained only half AS MANY bug attacks AS either of the other groups. (Paint fumes apparently were not enough to deter flies, since black-striped cows were bitten just as often as the control group.) Animals protected by their white stripes were also less stressed, exhibiting fewer head shakes, foot stomping, and other insect-AVOIDANCE BEHAVIOURS.

In a report published in an online journal, the Japanese scientists said the results SUGGESTED a promising, pesticide-free alternative to PROTECT livestock FROM biting flies - a menace which, according to one U.S. study, costs the beef and dairy industry more than $2 billion annually.
Serious economical implications aside, online reaction in Japan was emphatically positive. "What about a spider web pattern? That would really throw off the bugs," ONE wrote. "When are we getting zebra clothes for humans?" another one commented.

(*) pour paint-free, j'ai hésité : est-ce que paintless aurait pu convenir également ? ou bien paintless aurait-il signifié qu'on regrette l'absence de peinture ?



Réponse : Rack your brains and help!/60 de taiji43, postée le 15-12-2019 à 18:18:31 (S | E)
Dear Here4U

I am sending you my "help the studiant correction" , an exercise that keeps coming up = popping ??during the year ,it takes a lot of courage =guts ? for you to make all these corrections during Christmas and New Year’s Eve,Despite everything;I hope these celebrations fantastic !

READY TO BE CORRECTED

Why painting zebra stripes on cows could help SAVE the Japanese agricultural industry.

An experiment on a herd of cows in central Japan appears to have PROVEN ( fait ses preuves) a radical, NATURE -inspired solution (inspirée de la nature e) to a PEST problem that plagues the AGRICULTURAL industry. Industrie agricole)

Zebras and their gaudy coats have long intrigued scientifists, spawning a raft of theories about how and why few equine species developed stripes.

The consensus finally settled ABOUT a single answer: the zigzag pattern was an evolutionary response to BITING insects, especially carers for deadly diseases. Insects, it seems, have a harder time landing on striped surfaces than solid-colored ones.

A question: if it works for wild horses in Africa, why not cows in a Japanese pasture?
Together with colleagues IN Kyoto University, it was decided to run an EXPERIMENT (un essai), à titre d'essai) on a herd of Japanese black cattle.///END of PART 1 ///

Using water-based spray paint, one group of cows was given a fresh coat of white stripes, about two inches IN WIDTH each morning.
A second group got black stripes, and a third, the control group, went paint-free.

Researchers then sat up and watched as the flies descended, photographying the animals AT 30-minute intervals
and capturing sample insects with glue TRAPS (pièges)

Staff observed how frequently the cows did what cows do to ward off airborne blood-sucking PESTS (to pester = harceler ): shook their HEADS , flicked their NAILS and skin-twitched.

The white-striped animals, looking for everyone like a bovine chain gang, were no small source of barnyard mirth.

"People thought it was some kind of joke," someone told a Japan's TV network. But the results of going zebra were undeniable. ///END of PART 2 ///

The white-striped cows sustained only half as MANY bug attacks AS either of the other groups.

(Paint fumes apparently were not enough to deter flies, since black-striped cows were bitten just as often as the control group.)

Animals protected by their white stripes were also less stressed, exhibiting fewer head -shakes, foot- STAMPING, tapement du pied) and other insect-avoidant behavior.BEHAVIOUR (UK)

In a report published in an online journal, the Japanese scientists said the results suggest a promising, pesticide-free alternative to protecting livestock FROM or AGAINST biting flies - a menace which, according to one U.S. study, costs the beef and dairy industry more than $2 billion annually.

Serious ECONOMIC implications aside, online reaction in Japan was emphatically positive. "What about a spider web pattern? That would really throw off the bugs," wrote one. "When are we getting zebra clothes for humans?" ANOTHER COMMENTARY.///END of TEXT///



Réponse : Rack your brains and help!/60 de maya92, postée le 17-12-2019 à 17:12:34 (S | E)
Hello Here4u,

PLEASE, HELP my STUDENT! Ce texte contient de nombreuses fautes à corriger - en majuscules - Merci.

Why painting zebra stripes on cows could help saving the Japanese agricultural industry.

An experiment on a herd of cows in central Japan appears to have proved a radical, naturally-inspired solution to a PESTERING problem that plagues the agricultural industry.
Zebras and their gaudy coats have long intrigued SCIENTISTS, spawning a raft of theories about how and why few equine species developed stripes. The consensus finally settled ON a single answer: the zigzag pattern was an evolutionary response to BITING insects, especially CARRIERS OF deadly diseases. Insects, it seems, have a harder time landing on striped surfaces than solid-colored ones.
A question: if it works for wild horses in Africa, why not cows in a Japanese pasture? Together with colleagues at Kyoto University, it was decided to run an EXPERIMENT on a herd of Japanese black cattle.///END of PART 1 ///

Using water-based spray paint, one group of cows was given a fresh coat of white stripes, about two INCHES wide, each morning. A second group got black stripes, and a third, the control group, went paint-free.
Researchers then sat up and watched as the flies descended, PHOTOGRAPHING the animals AT 30 minute intervals and capturing sample insects with glue straps. Staff observed how frequently the cows did what cows do to ward off AERIAL blood-sucking PESTS: shook their head, flicked their TAIL and skin-twitched.
The white-striped animals, looking for everyone like a bovine chain gang, were no small source of COWSHED mirth.
"People thought it was some kind of joke," someone told a Japan's TV network. But the results of going zebra were undeniable. ///END of PART 2 ///

The white-striped cows sustained only half AS MANY bug attacks AS either of the other groups.(Paint fumes apparently were not enough t o deter flies, since black-striped cows were bitten just as often as the control group.) Animals protected by their white stripes were also less stressed, exhibiting fewer head shakes, foot STAMPING, and other insect-AVOIDING behavior.
In a report published in an online journal, the Japanese scientists said the results suggest a promising, pesticide-free alternative to protecting livestock FROM biting flies - a menace which, according to one U.S. study, costs the beef and dairy industry more than $2 billion annually.
Serious economical implications aside, online reaction in Japan was emphatically positive. "What about a spider web pattern? That would really throw off the bugs," wrote one. "When are we getting zebra clothes for humans?" another one commented.///END of TEXT///

Funny

This exercise is very exhausting cos you have to read and reread and every word looks like a trap…
Hve a nice Christmas time





Réponse : Rack your brains and help!/60 de joe39, postée le 19-12-2019 à 19:26:04 (S | E)
Hello dear Here4u
Here is my first work
Ready to be corrected.

Mon élève a fait tout son possible, mais il a tout de même laissé passer 16 fautes ...
Why painting zebra stripes on cows could help saving the Japanese agricultural industry.
An experiment on a herd of cows in central Japan appears to have PROVEN a radical, naturally-inspired solution to a PEST problem that plagues the agricultural industry.
Zebras and their gaudy coats have long intrigued SCIENTISTS, spawning a raft of theories about how and why few equine species developed stripes. The consensus finally settled around a single answer: the zigzag pattern was an evolutionary response to BITING insects, especially CARRIERS OF deadly diseases. Insects, it seems, have a harder time landing on striped surfaces than solid-colored ones.
A question: if it works for wild horses in Africa, why not cows in a Japanese pasture? Together with colleagues at Kyoto University, it was decided to run an EXPERIMENT on a herd of Japanese black cattle.///END of PART 1 ///

Using water-based spray paint, one group of cows was given a fresh coat of white stripes, about TWO INCHES WIDE, each morning. A second group got black stripes, and a third, the control group, went paint-free.
Researchers then sat BACK and watched as the flies descended, PHOTOGRAPHING the animals for 30-minute intervals and capturing sample insects with glue TRAPS. Staff observed how frequently the cows did what cows do to ward off airborne blood-sucking PESTS; shook their head, flicked their TAILS and skin-twitched.
The white-striped animals, BEHAVING EXACTLY like a bovine chain gang, were no small source of barnyard mirth.
"People thought it was some kind of joke," someone told a Japan's TV network. But the results of going zebra were undeniable. ///END of PART 2

The white-striped cows sustained only half AS MANY bug attacks AS either of the other groups. (Paint fumes apparently were not enough to deter flies, since black-striped cows were bitten just as often as the control group.) Animals protected by their white stripes were also less stressed, exhibiting fewer head shakes, foot stomping, and other insect-AVOIDANCE BEHAVIOURS.
In a report published in an online journal, the Japanese scientists said the results suggest a promising, pesticide-free alternative to protecting livestock FROM biting flies - a menace which, according to one U.S. study, costs the beef and dairy industry more than $2 billion annually.
Serious ECONOMIC implications aside, THE online reaction in Japan was emphatically positive. "What about a spider web pattern? That would really throw off the bugs," wrote one. "When are we getting zebra clothes for humans?" another (one) commented. ///END of TEXT///

I thank you very much for the somewhat “tricky” exercise and I hope you have a Warm and Sweet Christmas Eve.

So long.
Joe39



Réponse : Rack your brains and help!/60 de here4u, postée le 21-12-2019 à 11:43:08 (S | E)
Hello, Dear Hardworkers,

Still a few days to work on this strange text... Please, do it... As no VOLUNTEER has been declared for the Follow-up-Work, I'm a little worried ...
Obviously, this text has baffled you and I'm not sure everything was understood... I'm working hard on the correction to make things more explicit and clear... but will need your involvement for the post correction translation (which can be delayed as late as the end of December...) Counting on you, as ever ... (Do you need some EXTRA FORCE?)



Réponse : Rack your brains and help!/60 de maxwell, postée le 21-12-2019 à 12:27:27 (S | E)
Sorry I've forgotten.
I will choose the 1st part



Réponse : Rack your brains and help!/60 de boubouille, postée le 21-12-2019 à 22:31:07 (S | E)
Hello dear Here, hello everybody

Why PAINT zebra stripes on cows could help saving the Japanese agricultural industry.
An experiment on a herd of cows in central Japan appears to have proved a radical, naturally-inspired solution to a pester problem that PLAGUING the agricultural industry.
Zebras and their gaudy coats have long intrigued SCIENTISTS, spawning a raft of theories about how and why few equine species developed stripes.
The consensus finally settled around a single answer: the zigzag pattern was an evolutionary response to INSECT BITES, especially CAREGIVERS for deadly diseases. Insects, it seems, have a harder time landing on striped surfaces than solid-colored ones.
ONE question: if it works for wild horses in Africa, why not cows in a Japanese pasture? Together with colleagues FROM Kyoto University, it was decided to CARRY OUT AN EXPERIMENT on a herd of Japanese black cattle.///END of PART 1 ///

Merry Christmas



Réponse : Rack your brains and help!/60 de chocolatcitron, postée le 22-12-2019 à 00:21:39 (S | E)
Rack your brains and help!/60
Message de here4u posté le 11-12-2019 à 13:39:58 (S | E | F) Mercredi 25 décembre
Hello, my dear Here4u, thanks! FINISHED.
Hi Everybody!

Here is my work:
Why painting zebra stripes on cows could help saving the Japanese agricultural industry.
An experiment on a herd of cows in central Japan appears to have PROVEN a radical, NATURE-inspired solution to a PEST problem that plagues the agricultural industry.
Zebras and their gaudy coats have long intrigued SCIENTISTS, spawning a raft of theories about how and why few equine species developed stripes. The consensus finally settled around a single answer: the zigzag pattern was an evolutionary response to BITING insects, especially CARRIERS OF deadly diseases. Insects, it seems, have a harder time landing on striped surfaces than solid-colored ones.
A question: if it works for wild horses in Africa, why not cows in a Japanese pasture? Together with colleagues at Kyoto University, it was decided to run an EXPERIMENT on a herd of Japanese black cattle.///END of PART 1 ///
Using water-based spray paint, one group of cows was given a fresh coat of white stripes, about two-inch-wide, each morning. A second group got black stripes, and a third, the control group, went paint-free.
Researchers then sat BACK and watched as the flies descended, PHOTOGRAPHING the animals for 30-minute intervals and capturing sample insects with glue straps. Staff observed how frequently the cows did what cows do to ward off airborne blood-sucking PETS: shook their HEADS, flicked their TAILS and skin-twitched.
The white-striped animals, looking for everyone like a bovine chain gang, were no small source of barnyard mirth.
"People thought it was some kind of joke," someone told a Japan's TV network. But the results of going zebra were undeniable. ///END of PART 2 ///
The white-striped cows sustained only half AS MANY bug attacks AS either of the other groups. (Paint fumes apparently were not enough to deter flies, since black-striped cows were bitten just as often as the control group.) Animals protected by their white stripes were also less stressed, exhibiting fewer head shakes, foot stomping, and other insect-AVOIDANCE BEHAVIOURS.
In a report published in THE online journal, the Japanese scientists said the results suggest a promising, pesticide-free alternative to protecting livestock FROM biting flies - a menace which, according to one U.S. study, costs the beef and dairy industry more than $2 billion annually.
Serious ECONOMIC implications aside, online reaction in Japan was emphatically positive. "What about a spider web pattern? That would really throw off the bugs," wrote one. "When are we getting zebra clothes for humans?" another one commented.///END of TEXT///

Eh bien j'en ai trouvé plus… (18 erreurs en fait, j'ai dû me tromper… ) !

Have a very sweet week, and I wish a Merry Christmas to each of You!
See you soon.




Réponse : Rack your brains and help!/60 de here4u, postée le 23-12-2019 à 10:39:56 (S | E)
Envoyé par Magie qui avait des ennuis informatiques. J'avais promis de mettre son essai en ligne ... J'ai oublié. Elle a eu son exemplaire corrigé et colorisé ... Je ne vais pas remettre les couleurs ici, ni les appréciations personnelles ...

1)Message de magie8 (25 ans) envoyé il y a 2h48min17sec13/12/19
[∞ Ami(e)] [Fil de la conversation]
Re:

Hello,

Voici mon travail de correction , je ne suis pas certaine de pouvoir revenir dessus , c'est déjà toujours cela de fait.

Why painting zebra stripes on cows could help SAVE TTB the Japanese AGRICULTURE industry.TTB
An experiment on a herd of cows in central Japan appears to have proved a radical,NATUR(EL -inspired solution to a PEST problem that plagues the AGRICULTURE industry.TB
Zebras and their gaudy coats have long intrigued scientifists, spawning a raft of theories about how and why few equine species developed stripes. The consensus finally settled around a single answer: the zigzag pattern was an evolutionary response to (bite insects, especially CARRIERS of deadly diseasesTTB Insects, it seems, have a harder time landing on striped surfaces than solid-colored ones.
A question : if it works for wild horses in Africa, why not cows in a Japanese pasture? Together with colleagues at Kyoto University, it was decided to run an EXPERIMENT on a herd of Japanese black cattle.TTB
Using water-based spray paint, one group of cows was given a fresh coat of white stripes, about (two-inch-wide, each morning. A second group got black stripes, and a third, the control group, went paint-free.
Researchers then sat (up and watched as the flies descended, photographying the animals for 30-minute intervals and capturing sample insects with glue TRAPS TB . Staff observed how frequently the cows did what cows do to ward off airborne blood-sucking PESTS : shook their HEADS , flicked their TAILS TTB (= pluriel concret)and skin-twitched.
The white-striped animals, looking for everyone like a bovine chain gang, were no small source of barnyard mirth.
"People thought it was some kind of joke," someone told a Japan's TV network. But the results of going zebra were undeniable.TB
The white-striped cows sustained only half AS MANY bug attacks AS either (AS= OF the other groups.* (Paint fumes apparently were not enough to deter flies, since black-striped cows were bitten just as often as the control group.) Animals protected by their white stripes were also less stressed, exhibiting fewer head shakes, foot stomping, and other insect-avoidant behavior.TB
In a report published in an online journal, the Japanese scientists TB said the results suggest a promising, pesticide-free alternative to protecting livestock FROM biting flies TB -a menace which,according to one U.S..study,costs the beef and dairy industry more than $2 billion annually.
Serious economic(al implications aside ,online reaction in Japan was emphaticaly positive."What about a spider web pattern?That would really throw off the bugs," wrote one.When are we getting zebra clothes for humans?another one commented



Réponse : Rack your brains and help!/60 de alpiem, postée le 23-12-2019 à 11:47:26 (S | E)
Rack your brains and help!/60 le Mercredi 25 décembre FINISHED
hello, here4u and max


Why PAINT zebra stripes on cows could help savE the Japanese agricultural industry.

An experiment on a herd of cows in central Japan appears to have proved a radical, naturally-inspired solution to a pestING problem that plagues the agricultural industry.
Zebras and their gaudy coats have long intrigued scientISTS spawning a raft of theories about how and why few equine species developed stripes. The consensus finally settled around a single answer: the zigzag pattern was an evolutionary response to bitTING insects, especially CARRIERS OF deadly diseases. Insects, it seems, have a harder time landing on striped surfaces than solid-colored ones.
A question: if it works for wild horses in Africa, why not cows in a Japanese pasture? Together with colleagues at Kyoto University, it was decided to run an experience on a herd of Japanese black cattle.///END of PART 1 ///

Using water-based spray paint, one group of cows was given a fresh coat of white stripes, about two-inch-wide, each morning. A second group got black stripes, and a third, the control group, went paint-free.
Researchers then sat up and watched as the flies descended, photographying the animals for 30-minute intervals and capturing sample insects with glue straps. Staff observed how frequently the cows did what cows do to ward off airborne blood-sucking PESTS: SHAKE their head, FLICK their nail and skin-twitch.
The white-striped animals, looking for everyone like a bovine chain gang, were no small source of barnyard mirth.
"People thought it was some kind of A joke," someone told a Japan's TV network. But the results of going zebra were undeniable. ///END of PART 2 ///

The white-striped cows sustained only half AS much bug attacks AS either of the other groups.(Paint fumes apparently were not enough to deter flies, WHEREAS black-striped cows were bitten just as often as the control group.) Animals protected by their white stripes were also less stressed, exhibiting fewer head shakes, foot stomping, and other insect-avoidant behavior.
In a report published in an online journal, the Japanese scientists said the results suggest a promising, pesticide-free alternative to PROTECT livestock FROM biting flies - a menace which, according to AN U.S. study, costs the beef and dairy industry more than $2 billionS annually.
Serious economical implications aside WITH online reactionS in Japan WERE emphatically positive. "What about a spider web pattern? That would really throw off the bugs," wrote one. "When are we getting zebra clothes for humans?" another one commented.///END of TEXT///




Réponse : Rack your brains and help!/60 de here4u, postée le 25-12-2019 à 20:07:56 (S | E)
Hello, Dear hardworkers and correctors,

Vous avez trouvé cet exercice "amusant", disons "étonnant" par son sujet et difficile par sa construction ... Je vous avoue que d'après les "corrections" que vous avez faites, je me doute qu'il va y avoir quelques tiraillements dans les traductions du Follow up Work!(surtout dans les parties 2 et 3 !) Soyez téméraires ... Merci aux volontaires ... Don't forget that I'm here 2 help!


Why painting zebra stripes on cows could help save (1) the Japanese agriculture industry*.
An experiment on a herd of cows in central Japan appears to have proved a radical, nature-inspired (2)solution to a pest problem (3) that plagues the agriculture industry*.
Zebras and their gaudy coats have long intrigued scientists (4), spawning a raft of theories about how and why a few equine species (5) developed stripes. The consensus finally settled around a single answer: the zigzag pattern was an evolutionary response to biting (6) insects, especially carriers (7) of deadly diseases. Insects, it seems, have a harder time landing on striped surfaces than solid-colored ones.
A question: if it works for wild horses in Africa, why not cows in a Japanese pasture? Together with colleagues at Kyoto University, it was decided to run an experiment (8) on a herd of Japanese black cattle../// END of PART 1 ///
Using water-based spray paint, one group of cows was given a fresh coat of white stripes, about two inches wide (9), each morning. A second group got black stripes, and a third, the control group, went paint-free.
Researchers then sat back (10) and watched as the flies descended, photographing (11) the animals for 30-minute intervals and capturing sample insects with glue traps. Staff observed how frequently the cows did what cows do to ward off airborne blood-sucking pests: shook their heads, flicked their tails (12) and skin-twitched.
The white-striped animals, looking for all the world like a bovine chain gang, were no small source of barnyard mirth.
"People thought it was some kind of joke," someone told a Japan's TV network. But the results of going zebra were undeniable./// END of PART 2 ///
The white-striped cows sustained only half as many bug attacks as (13) either of the other groups. (Paint fumes apparently were not enough to deter flies, since black-striped cows were bitten just as often as the control group.) Animals protected by their white stripes were also less stressed (14), exhibiting fewer head shakes, foot stomping, and other insect-avoidant behavior.
In a report published in an online journal, the Japanese scientifists said the results suggest a promising, pesticide-free alternative to protecting livestock from (15) biting flies - a menace which, according to one U.S. study, costs the beef and dairy industry more than $2 billion annually.
Serious economic(16)implications aside, online reaction in Japan was emphatically positive. "What about a spider web pattern? That would really throw off the bugs," wrote one. "When are we getting zebra clothes for humans?" another one commented. /// END of the TEXT ///



* Un "détail" : mon élève a écrit "agricultural industry", le texte disait "agriculture industry"... J'ai cherché et trouvé les deux expressions à l'intérieur d'un même article alors que je pensais l'un , l'autre ! "Que nenni" ! j'aurais pu (dû ? ) accepter les deux formes ... Sorry...
(1) Là, certains m’ont « énervée »… Ç’est au moins la 4è fois que je répète la construction de « to help » + infinitif SANS TO ou To help + infinitif complet …. Mais pas ING ! La prochaine fois, je mords !
(2) a nature-inspired solution= adjectif composé qui signifie « a solution inspired by Nature ».
(3) A pest problem= a problem caused by pest : Lien internet
// Lien internet

(4) Science=> a scientist. (faute très commune pour les Francophones …)
(5) a few species: a species= singulier ; a few species= dénombrable pluriel
(6) a biting insect bites you…= un adjectif en ing qui prouve que le sujet fait l’action.
(7) especially carriers of deadly diseases. To carry= a carrier= something (or someone) carrying something. // A carer cares for someone. Lien internet

(8) to run an experiment= faire un expérience scientifique.
(9) about two inches wide: ici, "inches" n’est pas un adjectif (qui resterait invariable), mais un nom qui s’accorde (an inch=> two inches).
(10) to sit up= You're lying and then sit up. hwww.wordreference.com/enfr/sit%20back
(11) photographing: comme je vous l’ai déjà dit plusieurs fois, le verbe est TO PHOTOGRAPH. Pour construire la forme en –ing=> PHOTOGRAPHING. Photography est un NOM (l’art de la photographie)
(12) shook their heads, flicked their tails= chacune a une tête et une queue [nail= ongle ou clou], donc, avec le pluriel concret anglais, il y a, en tout, plusieurs têtes et plusieurs queues.
(13) half as many bug attacks as= attention pour celui (ou celle) qui va traduire ce passage … mais bien retenir la construction.(il faut employer "many" parce que "attacks", le nom, est dénombrable pluriel.)
(14) Mon élève a « oublié » de faire la faute prévue entre less « stressed » et less stressing …. Il faut dire que c'était facile ... donc, il a dû bien réfléchir ...
Vous avez corrigé « stomp » en « stamp » … J’y vois une différence …
Lien internet

Lien internet

Lien internet

Verrez-vous la même que moi ?
(15) livestock from biting flies = OF biting flies.
(16) Serious economical implications: difference between «economic» and «economical» Lien internet
Rien à voir !


Vous avez le temps de préparer les traductions ... Profitez bien de votre famille et amis ... 🎅 🎄 🎁 🤶 🎅





Réponse : Rack your brains and help!/60 de maxwell, postée le 26-12-2019 à 21:01:09 (S | E)
FINISHED
Hello!
Here's PART I:

Why painting zebra stripes on cows could help save the Japanese agriculture industry.
An experiment on a herd of cows in central Japan appears to have proved a radical, nature-inspired solution to a pest problem that plagues the agriculture industry.
Zebras and their gaudy coats have long intrigued scientists, spawning a raft of theories about how and why a few equine species developed stripes. The consensus finally settled around a single answer: the zigzag pattern was an evolutionary response to biting insects, especially carrier of deadly diseases. Insects, it seems, have a harder time landing on striped surfaces than solid-colored ones.
A question: if it works for wild horses in Africa, why not cows in a Japanese pasture? Together with colleagues at Kyoto University, it was decided to run an experiment on a herd of Japanese black cattle..

Pourquoi le fait de peindre des bandes zébrées sur les vaches pourrait aider à sauver le secteur agricole japonais.
Une expérience (*) faite sur un troupeau de vaches dans le centre du Japon s'est révélée être une solution radicale et inspirée par la nature, à un problème d'insectes nuisibles qui ronge l'industrie agricole.
Les zèbres avec leur pelage voyant ont longtemps intrigué les scientifiques, donnant naissance à toute une série de théories sur pourquoi et comment quelques espèces équines ont développé des rayures. Le consensus s'est finalement établi autour d'une seule réponse : le motif du zigzag était une réponse évolutionniste aux insectes piqueurs, notamment ceux porteurs de maladies mortelles. Il semble que les insectes ont plus de difficulté à se poser sur des surfaces striées qu'unies.
Question : si cela fonctionne pour des chevaux sauvages en Afrique, pourquoi pas pour des vaches dans un pâturage japonais ? En collaboration avec des collègues à l'université de Kyoto, il fut décidé de mener une expérience sur un troupeau de bétail noir japonais...

(*) expérimentation aurait-il pu convenir aussi ?



Réponse : Rack your brains and help!/60 de chocolatcitron, postée le 26-12-2019 à 21:51:49 (S | E)
Hello my dear Here4u!
Hi Everybody!

Je me propose pour la partie 2, puisque il n'y a encore personne ! FINISHED.

Thanks to Maxwell, a reliable hard worker!

Here is my work:
Using water-based spray paint, one group of cows was given a fresh coat of white stripes, about two inches wide (9), each morning. A second group got black stripes, and a third, the control group, went paint-free.
Researchers then sat back (10) and watched as the flies descended, photographing (11) the animals for 30-minute intervals and capturing sample insects with glue traps. Staff observed how frequently the cows did what cows do to ward off airborne blood-sucking pests: shook their heads, flicked their tails (12) and skin-twitched.
The white-striped animals, looking for all the world like a bovine chain gang, were no small source of barnyard mirth.
"People thought it was some kind of joke," someone told a Japan's TV network. But the results of going zebra were undeniable.


À l'aide de peinture à base d'eau, un groupe de vaches recevait une couche fraîche de rayures blanches, d'environ deux pouces de large, chaque matin. Un deuxième groupe a reçu des rayures noires, et un troisième, le groupe témoin, est allé sans peinture.
Les chercheurs se sont ensuite assis et ont regardé les mouches descendre, photographiant les animaux pendant des intervalles de 30 minutes et capturant des insectes échantillonnés avec des pièges à colle. Le personnel a observé à quelle fréquence les vaches faisaient ce que les vaches faisaient pour conjurer les ravageurs suceurs de sang en suspension dans l'air : secouaient la tête, balayaient de leur queue, et faire frissonner leur peau.
Les animaux à rayures blanches, à la recherche de tout le monde comme un gang de la chaîne bovine, n'étaient pas une petite source de gaîté de cœur.
"Les gens pensaient que c'était une sorte de blague", a dit quelqu'un à une chaîne de télévision du Japon. Mais les résultats de transformations en zèbres étaient indéniables.

Il reste la troisième partie : je me lance dans l'aventure, avant que tu ne me mordes ? ("Help + infinitif complet ou sans to mais pas avec ing !")


The white-striped cows sustained only half as many bug attacks as (13) either of the other groups. (Paint fumes apparently were not enough to deter flies, since black-striped cows were bitten just as often as the control group.) Animals protected by their white stripes were also less stressed (14), exhibiting fewer head shakes, foot stomping, and other insect-avoidant behavior.
In a report published in an online journal, the Japanese scientifists said the results suggest a promising, pesticide-free alternative to protecting livestock from (15) biting flies - a menace which, according to one U.S. study, costs the beef and dairy industry more than $2 billion annually.
Serious economic(16)implications aside, online reaction in Japan was emphatically positive. "What about a spider web pattern? That would really throw off the bugs," wrote one. "When are we getting zebra clothes for humans?" another one commented. /// END of the TEXT ///


Les vaches à rayures blanches ont subi deux fois moins d'attaques de punaises que l'un ou l'autre des autres groupes. (Les vapeurs de peinture n'étaient apparemment pas suffisantes pour dissuader les mouches, puisque les vaches à rayures noires ont été mordues aussi souvent que le groupe témoin.) Les animaux protégés par leurs rayures blanches étaient également moins stressés, présentant moins de tremblements de tête, de piétinement des pieds et d'autres comportements d’évitement d'insectes.
Dans un rapport publié dans une revue en ligne, les scientifiques japonais ont déclaré que les résultats suggèrent une alternative prometteuse et sans pesticides à la protection du bétail contre les mouches piquantes - une menace qui, selon une étude américaine, coûte à l'industrie bovine et laitière plus de 2 milliards de dollars par an.
Les graves implications économiques mises à part, la réaction en ligne au Japon a été catégoriquement positive. "Qu'en est-il un motif de toile d'araignée? Ce serait vraiment se débarrasser des bestioles », a écrit l'un. "Quand allons-nous obtenir des vêtements zébrés pour les humains? " a commenté un autre. END du TEXTE ///

Have a very sweet Week my dear Here4u!
See you soon!



Réponse : Rack your brains and help!/60 de here4u, postée le 26-12-2019 à 22:37:43 (S | E)
Hello Dearest Dears!

Voici votre Follow up Work...

Un ENORME merci aux volontaires déclarés ...

Why painting zebra stripes on cows could help save the Japanese agriculture industry.
An experiment on a herd of cows in central Japan appears to have proved a radical, nature-inspired solution to a pest problem that plagues the agriculture industry*.
Zebras and their gaudy coats have long intrigued scientists, spawning a raft of theories about how and why a few equine species developed stripes. The consensus finally settled around a single answer: the zigzag pattern was an evolutionary response to biting insects, especially carriers of deadly diseases. Insects, it seems, have a harder time landing on striped surfaces than solid-colored ones.
A question: if it works for wild horses in Africa, why not cows in a Japanese pasture? Together with colleagues at Kyoto University, it was decided to run an experiment on a herd of Japanese black cattle..

Pourquoi le fait de peindre des bandes zébrées sur des vaches pourrait aider à sauver le secteur agricole japonais.
Une expérience (*) faite sur un troupeau de vaches dans le centre du Japon s'est révélée être une solution radicale et inspirée par la nature, à un problème d'insectes nuisibles qui ronge l'industrie agricole.
Les zèbres avec leur pelage voyant ont longtemps intrigué les scientifiques, donnant naissance à toute une série de théories sur pourquoi et comment quelques espèces équines ont développé des rayures. Le consensus s'est finalement établi autour d'une seule réponse : le motif du zigzag était une réponse évolutionniste aux insectes piqueurs, notamment ceux porteurs de maladies mortelles. Il semble que les insectes ont plus de difficultés à se poser sur des surfaces striées qu'unies.
Question : si cela fonctionne pour des chevaux sauvages en Afrique, pourquoi pas pour des vaches dans un pâturage japonais ? En collaboration avec des collègues à l'université de Kyoto, il fut décidé de mener une expérience sur un troupeau de bétail noir japonais...

(*) expérimentation aurait-il pu convenir aussi ? Pourquoi pas ? Je dirais "oui". Il s'agit bin ici d'une "expérience" au sens d'"expérimentation". Excellente traduction ! BRAVO Maxwell et


Using water-based spray paint, one group of cows was given a fresh coat of white stripes, about two inches wide, each morning. A second group got black stripes, and a third, the control group, went paint-free.
Researchers then sat back and watched as the flies descended, photographing the animals for 30-minute intervals and capturing sample insects with glue traps. Staff observed how frequently the cows did what cows do to ward off airborne blood-sucking pests: shook their heads, flicked their tails and skin-twitched.
The white-striped animals, looking for all the world like a bovine chain gang, were no small source of barnyard mirth.
"People thought it was some kind of joke," someone told a Japan's TV network. But the results of going zebra were undeniable.

À l'aide de peinture à base d'eau, un groupe de vaches reçut une couche fraîche de rayures blanches d'environ deux pouces de large, chaque matin. Un deuxième groupe eut des rayures noires, et un troisième, le groupe témoin, ne reçut aucune peinture.
Les chercheurs attendirent ensuite patiemment, regardant les mouches arriver, photographiant les animaux pendant/ à des intervalles de 30 minutes et capturant des insectes étiquetés sur des pièges couverts de colle. Le personnel a observé à quelle fréquence les vaches faisaient ce que les vaches font habituellement pour chasser les parasites volants suceurs de sang : secouant la tête, balayant de leur queue, et faisant contracter leur peau.
Les animaux à rayures blanches, à la recherche de tout le monde qui, pour tout le monde ressemblaient à des forçats bovins enchaînés * firent bien rire les employés des cours de fermes.
"Les gens pensaient que c'était une sorte de blague", a dit quelqu'un à une chaîne de télévision du Japon. Mais les résultats de la transformation en zèbres furent indéniables.

* Allusion à ce que vous avez tous vu dans des films : des forçats enchaînés (en costume rayé de prisonniers) en train de marcher en lignes ...
BRAVO, vraiment de t'être lancée de façon héroïque dans cette très bonne traduction (extrêmement difficile aussi ...) et ma Choco !

The white-striped cows sustained only half as many bug attacks as either of the other groups. (Paint fumes apparently were not enough to deter flies, since black-striped cows were bitten just as often as the control group.) Animals protected by their white stripes were also less stressed, exhibiting fewer head shakes, foot stomping, and other insect-avoidant behavior.
In a report published in an online journal, the Japanese scientifists said the results suggest a promising, pesticide-free alternative to protecting livestock from biting flies - a menace which, according to one U.S. study, costs the beef and dairy industry more than $2 billion annually.
Serious economic implications aside, online reaction in Japan was emphatically positive. "What about a spider web pattern? That would really throw off the bugs," wrote one. "When are we getting zebra clothes for humans?" another one commented.

Les vaches à rayures blanches ont subi deux fois moins d'attaques e punaises d'insectes que n'importe lequel des autres groupes. (Les vapeurs de peinture n'étaient apparemment pas suffisantes pour dissuader les mouches, puisque les vaches à rayures noires ont été mordues tout aussi souvent que le groupe témoin.) Les animaux protégés par leurs rayures blanches étaient également moins stressés, présentant moins de tremblements de tête, de piétinement des pieds et d'autres comportements d’évitement d'insectes.
Dans un rapport publié dans une revue en ligne, les scientifiques japonais ont déclaré que les résultats suggèrent une alternative prometteuse et sans pesticides à la protection du bétail contre les mouches piquantes - menace qui, selon une étude américaine, coûte à l'industrie bovine et laitière plus de 2 milliards de dollars par an.
De graves implications économiques mises à part, les réactions en ligne au Japon a été catégoriquement positive. "Et si l'on choisissait un motif de toile d'araignée ? Ce serait vraiment troubler des bestioles », a écrit l'un. "Quand les humains porteront-ils des vêtements zébrés? " a commenté un autre.


Excellente traduction! Bravo, Choco !

MAY THE FORCE BE with all of YOU! Merci à tous les participants.





Réponse : Rack your brains and help!/60 de chocolatcitron, postée le 27-12-2019 à 13:35:00 (S | E)
TCHOU TCHOU TCHOU Here4u !

La troisième partie est faite, avant que je me fasse croquer d'un coup de dents !!! (Je suis de celles qui t'ont hérissée avec mon "help + ing", faute que je ne ferai plus, je l'espère !)

À moins que tu ne veuilles pas de mon travail... 🤣
Bonne journée à toi !



Réponse : Rack your brains and help!/60 de here4u, postée le 27-12-2019 à 22:34:42 (S | E)
Tu es pardonnée, Choco ... comme tous les autres, d'ailleurs !




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