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Rack Your Brains and Help! 77

Cours gratuits > Forum > Exercices du forum || En bas

[POSTER UNE NOUVELLE REPONSE] [Suivre ce sujet]


Rack Your Brains and Help! 77
Message de here4u posté le 28-08-2020 à 22:29:39 (S | E | F)
Hello dearest friends,

Voici un nouvel exercice de recherche de ce qui se dit - ou pas ! Les vacances se poursuivent encore ... on dirait que le rythme est difficile à reprendre ...
Encore un sujet "anecdotique" qui a attiré l'attention de mon élève ... Alors, coïncidence ? Lien de cause à effet ? Qui peut le dire ? Vous, peut-être ...

Cet exercice est un et sa correction sera en ligne le samedi 12 septembre.

PLEASE, HELP MY STUDENT!
Malgré ses efforts, il reste 18 fautes dans son texte [plusieurs sont répétées maintes fois ...] Merci de l'aider à les corriger EN LETTRES CAPITALES. Il compte sur vous ...


A bit of sunshine can cause many of us dreaming of ice cream, sunbathing and beaches, but warm whether can also make us violent, grumpy and depressed. Why?
The earliest studies into the phenomenon emerged in the late 19th century, coinciding with the first reliable crime statistic. According to one analysis, offences against people tended to peak in the summer months, while crimes against property were found to be more common in the winter. Since then, the evidences are piling up. City riots are most common during good whether and people less like to take to the streets when it is raining. Every year, as the mercury is rising, we’re undergoing a collective transformation. Some of the symptoms are relatively minor – people like more to honk their horns when they’re sticked in traffic; the police usually notices a spike in disorder behaviour; and we like less to help strangers out. /// END of Part ONE /// Then there are the uprisings. In one study, scientists tracked uprisings around the world and found that the overwhelming majority occurred in the summer months. Wherever end of the planet they looked at, the relationship still held up.
More recent studies have confirmed the link between social movements and the weather. While it’s clear that the injustices and other triggers for social disrest can happen all year round, it seems that we far more like to react when it’s warm. The relationship between heat and things like rioting is U-shaped. So when it becomes very hot or humid, people don't do anything because it's just two uncomfortable to move.
Why the whether has such power over our behaviour is a total mystery – but as the world heats up, scientists are racing to find some answers.There is plenty of evidences that high temperatures make us more angry and stressed, and less happy./// END of Part TWO /// One of the more obvious possibilities is that hot, stuffy whether is uncomfortable, which puts us in a collectively worst mood, and leads to harmful behaviour: high temperatures make us more angry and stressed, and less happy.
Climate change threatens bringing more intense heatwaves, more often, so understanding the link between whether and behaviour is most important than never. It has some uneasy implications for the future. Scientists have predicted that, as climate change kicks in, just a 2C increase in global average temperatures could increase the right of violent crime by more than 3% in temperate regions such as Western Europe. At the moment, many experts believe we’re on track for a temperature rise of over 3C, even if we meet all our current climate commitments. Why the whether affects us remains a mystery, perhaps we’d better brace ourselves on what’s coming./// END of the Text ///

Alors, on reste calme ... Courage à tous ... Tout le monde peut participer ! Nous comptons sur vous !
(HERE'S THE FORCE! in case you need it! )


Réponse : Rack Your Brains and Help! 77 de maya92, postée le 29-08-2020 à 18:05:32 (S | E)
Hello Here4u,


A bit of sunshine can cause many of us TO DREAM of ice cream, sunbathing and beaches, but warm WEATHER can also make us violent, grumpy and depressed. Why?
The earliest studies AS TO the phenomenon emerged in the late 19th century, coinciding with the first reliable crime STATISTICS. According to AN analysis, offences against people tended to peak in the summer months, while crimes against property were found to be more common in () winter. Since then, the EVIDENCE are piling up. City riots are most common during FINE WEATHER and people less LIKELY to take to the streets when it is raining. Every year, as the mercury is rising, we’re undergoing a collective transformation. Some of the symptoms are relatively minor – people like more to honk their horns when they’re STUCK in traffic; the police usually NOTICE a spike in disorder behaviour; and we like less to help strangers out. /// END of Part ONE ///
Then there are the uprisings. In one study, scientists tracked uprisings around the world and found that the overwhelming majority occurred in the summer months. WHATEVER end of the planet they looked at, the relationship still held up.
More recent studies have confirmed the link between social movements and the weather. While it’s clear that the injustices and other triggers for social DISORDERS can happen all year round, it seems that BY FAR we PREFER to react when it’s warm. The relationship between heat and things like rioting is U-shaped. So when it becomes very hot or humid, people don't do anything because it's just TOO uncomfortable to move.
Why has the WEATHER such power over our behaviour is a total mystery – but as the world heats up, scientists are racing to find some answers. There is plenty of EVIDENCE that high temperatures make us more angry and stressed, and less happy./// END of Part TWO ///6
One of the MOST obvious POSSIBILITY is that hot, stuffy WEATHER is uncomfortable, which puts us in a collectively worst mood, and leads to harmful behaviour: high temperatures make us more angry and stressed, and less happy.
Climate change threatens TO BRING more intense heatwaves, more often, so understanding the link between WEATHER and behaviour is MORE important than never. It has some uneasy implications for the future. Scientists have predicted that, as climate change kicks in, just a 2C increase in global average temperatures could increase the RATE of violent crime by more than 3% in temperate regions such as Western Europe. At the moment, many experts believe we’re on track for a temperature rise of over 3C, even if we meet all our current climate commitments. Why the WEATHER affects us remains a mystery, perhaps we’d better brace ourselves on what’s coming./// END of the Text ///

Alors, on reste calme
Is it an idea or do the holiday have softened your subtleties ? This text seems easier than usual … 
I hope you had a nice time and a good rest - Love



Réponse : Rack Your Brains and Help! 77 de taiji43, postée le 30-08-2020 à 19:03:50 (S | E)
hello here4U, and to all of you !
I left the snowy high peaks to go back to the Forum, this Sunday when I am exceptionally free.
As Y am concerned this correction had easy mistakes to find, however the verbs either in the infinitive or gerund raise a problem .
Thanks for your corrections

bit of sunshine can cause many of us TO DREAM of ice cream, sunbathing and beaches, but warm whether can also make us violent, grumpy and depressed. Why?

The earliest studies into the phenomenon emerged in the late 19th century, coinciding with the first reliable crime statistic. According to one analysis, offences against people tended to peak in the summer months, while crimes against property were found to be more common in the winter.

Since then, the EVIDENCE (uncountable) IS piling up. City riots are most common during good WEATHER and people ARE less LIKELY to take to the streets when it is raining. Every year, as the mercury RISES we’re undergoing a collective transformation.

Some of the symptoms are relatively minor – people (LIKE TO HONK MORE OK mais on peut crire ARE MORE LIKELY plus enclins) to honk their horns when they’re STUCK in traffic; the police( pluriel) usually NOTICE a spike in DISORDERLY (adj) behaviour; and we like less to help strangers out. /// END of Part ONE ///

Then there are the uprisings. In one study, scientists tracked uprisings around the world and found that the overwhelming majority occurred in the summer months. WHISHEVER THE (quelque soit l'extrémité )end of the planet they looked at, the relationship still held up.

More recent studies have confirmed the link between social movements and the weather. While it’s clear that the injustices and other triggers for social disrest???DISORDERS ???? can happen all year round, it seems that we ARE far more LIKELY to react when it’s warm. The relationship between heat and things like rioting is U-shaped. So when it becomes very hot or humid, people don't do anything because it's just TOO uncomfortable to move.

Why the WEATHER has such power over our behaviour is a total mystery – but as the world heats up, scientists are racing to find some answers.There is plenty of EVIDENCE that high temperatures make us more angry and stressed, and less happy./// END of Part TWO ///

One of the MOST obvious posibilities is that hot, stuffy WEATHER is uncomfortable, which puts us in a collectively WORSE mood, and leads to harmful behaviour: high temperatures make us more angry and stressed, and less happy.

Climate change threatensTO BRING more intense heatwaves, more often, so understanding the link between WEATHER and behaviour is MORE important than EVER It has some uneasy implications for the future. Scientists have predicted that, as climate change kicks in, just a 2C increase in global average temperatures could increase the RATE of violent crime by more than 3% in temperate regions such as Western Europe.

At the moment, many experts believe we’re on track for a temperature rise of over 3C, even if we meet all our current climate commitments. Why the WEATHER affects us remains a mystery, perhaps we’d better brace ourselves FOR what’s coming./// END of the Text ///



Réponse : Rack Your Brains and Help! 77 de alpiem, postée le 04-09-2020 à 11:20:02 (S | E)
Rack Your Brains and Help! 77 HELLO,HERE 4U

il reste 18 fautes mY TRY IS READY FOR EVALUATION

A bit of sunshine can cause many of us DREAM of ice cream, sunbathing and beaches, but warm WHEATHER can also make us violent, grumpy and depressed.
Why?
The earliest studies ABOUT the phenomenon emerged in the late 19th century, coinciding with the first reliable crime statistic.
According to one analysis, offences against people tended to peak in the summer months, while crimes against property were found to be more common in //// winter.
Since then, BITS OF EVIDENCE are piling up.

City riots are most common during good wheAther and people less LIKELY to take to the streets when it is raining.
Every year, as mercury is rising, we’re undergoing a collective transformation. Some of the symptoms are relatively minor – people more LIKELY to honk their horns when they’re STUCK in traffic; the police usually notices a spike in DISORDERED behaviour; and we ARE less LIKELY to help strangers out. /// END of Part ONE ///


Then there are the uprisings. In one study,
More recent studies have confirmed the link between social movements and the weather. While it’s clear that INJUSTICE and other triggers for social DISTRESS can happen all year round, it seems that we ARE far more LIKELY to react when it’s warm.

The relationship between heat and things like rioting is U-shaped. So when it becomes very hot or humid, people don't do anything because it's just TOO uncomfortable to move.

Why the WHEATHER has such power over our behaviour is a total mystery – but as the world heats up, scientists are racing to find some answers.

There is plenty OF evidence that high temperatures make us more angry and stressed, and less happy./// END of Part TWO ///

One of the more obvious possibilities is that hot, stuffy whether is uncomfortable, which puts us in a collectively worst mood, and leads to harmful behaviour: high temperatures make us more angry and stressed, and less happy.

Climate change threatens bringing more intense heatwaves, more often, so understanding the link between WHEATHER and behaviour is most important than EVER.

THERE IS some uneasy IMPLICATION for the future. Scientists have predicted that, as climate change kicks in, just a 2C increase in global average temperatures could increase the RATE of violent crime by more than 3% in temperate regions such as Western Europe.

At the moment, many experts believe we’re on track for a temperature rise of over 3C, even if we meet all our current climate commitments. Why the WHEATHER affects us remains a mystery, perhaps we’d better brace ourselves on what’s coming./// END of the Text ///



Réponse : Rack Your Brains and Help! 77 de maxwell, postée le 05-09-2020 à 08:47:07 (S | E)
READY TO BE CORRECTED
hello Here4U
Thanks again, I'll always find this exercise the most difficult one. I can't find any other mistakes, and after proofreading, I guess I'll just have to cross my fingers

A bit of sunshine can cause many of us TO DREAM of ice cream, sunbathing and beaches, but warm WEATHER can also make us violent, grumpy and depressed. Why?
The earliest studies into the phenomenon emerged in the late 19th century, coinciding with the first reliable crime STATISTICS. According to one analysis, offences against people tended to peak in the summer months, while crimes against property were found to be more common in the winter. Since then, the EVIDENCE IS piling up. City riots are most common during good WEATHER and people like to take to the streets  LESS OFTEN when it is raining. Every year, as the mercury is rising, we’re undergoing a collective transformation. Some of the symptoms are relatively minor – people like to honk their horns MORE when they’re STUCK in traffic; the police usually NOTICE a spike in disorder behaviour; and we like to help strangers out LESS. /// END of Part ONE /// 

Then there are the uprisings. In one study, scientists tracked uprisings around the world and found that the overwhelming majority occurred in the summer months. WHICHEVER end of the planet they looked at, the relationship still held up.
More recent studies have confirmed the link between social movements and the weather. While it’s clear that the injustices and other triggers for social UNREST can happen all year round, it seems that we like to react when it’s warm FAR MORE. The relationship between heat and things like rioting is U-shaped. So when it becomes very hot or humid, people don't do anything because it's just TOO uncomfortable to move.
Why the WEATHER has such power over our behaviour is a total mystery – but as the world heats up, scientists are racing to find some answers. There is plenty of EVIDENCE that high temperatures make us more angry and stressed, and less happy./// END of Part TWO /// 

One of the MOST obvious possibilities is that hot, stuffy WEATHER is uncomfortable, which puts us in a collectively WORSE mood, and leads to harmful behaviour: high temperatures make us more angry and stressed, and less happy.
Climate change threatens bringing more intense heat waves, more often, so understanding the link between WEATHER and behaviour is MORE important than EVER. It has some uneasy implications for the future. Scientists have predicted that, as climate change kicks in, just a 2°C increase in global average temperatures could increase the RATE of violent crime by more than 3% in temperate regions such as Western Europe. At the moment, many experts believe we’re on track for a temperature rise of over 3°C, even if we meet all our current climate commitments. Why the WEATHER affects us remains a mystery, perhaps we’d better brace ourselves FOR what’s coming./// END of the Text ///



Réponse : Rack Your Brains and Help! 77 de joe39, postée le 06-09-2020 à 10:37:03 (S | E)
Hello dear here4u
Here’s my try ready to be examined
18 mistakes
A bit of sunshine can cause many of us TO DREAM - 1 of ice cream, sunbathing and beaches, but warm WEATHER – 2 can also make us violent, grumpy and depressed. Why?
The earliest studies into the phenomenon emerged in the late 19th century,
coinciding with the first reliable crime STATISTICS - 3. According to one analysis, offences against people tended to peak in the summer months, while crimes against property were found to be more common in the winter. Since then, the evidences are piling up.
City riots are most common during FINE - 4 WEATHER and people less like to take to the streets when it is raining. Every year, as the mercury is rising, we’re undergoing a collective transformation. Some of the symptoms are relatively minor – people ARE - 5 MORE LIKELY – 6 to honk their horns when they’re STUCK -7 in traffic; the police usually NOTICE 8 a spike in DISORDERED - 9 behaviour; and we ARE LESS LIKELY - 10 to help strangers out. /// END of Part ONE ///

Then there are the uprisings. In one study, scientists tracked uprisings around the world and found that the overwhelming majority occurred in the summer months. WHICHEVER -11 end of the planet they looked at, the relationship still held up.

More recent studies have confirmed the link between social movement and the weather. While it’s clear that the injustices and other triggers for social UNREST – 12 can happen all year round, it seems that we ARE - 13 far more LIKELY- to react when it’s warm. The relationship between heat and things like rioting is U-shaped. So when it becomes very hot or humid, people don't do anything because it's just TOO – 14 uncomfortable to move.
Why the WEATHER has such power over our behaviour is a total mystery – but as the world heats up, scientists are racing to find some answers.There is plenty of evidences that high temperatures make us more angry and stressed, and less happy./// END of Part TWO ///
One of the MOST - 15 obvious possibilities is that hot, stuffy WEATHER is uncomfortable, which puts us in a collectively WORSE - 16 mood, and leads to harmful behaviour: high temperatures make us more angry and stressed, and less happy.
Climate change threatens TO BRING 17 more intense heatwaves, more often, so understanding the link between WEATHER and behaviour is most important than EVER - 18.
It has some uneasy implications for the future. Scientists have predicted that, as climate change kicks in, just a 2C increase in global average temperatures could increase the right of violent crime by more than 3% in temperate regions such as Western Europe. At the moment, many experts believe we’re on track for a temperature rise of over 3C, even if we meet all our current climate commitments. Why the WEATHER affects us remains a mystery, perhaps we’d better brace ourselves FOR – 19 what’s coming./// END of the Text ///

...and what's coming is not a minor thing, indeed.
I hope you have a nice Sunday and I thank you for the demanding exercise.
So long.
joe39



Réponse : Rack Your Brains and Help! 77 de here4u, postée le 09-09-2020 à 15:42:29 (S | E)
Hello, Dear Workers!

C'est parti ! Je commence à vous envoyer vos corrections. Les "retardataires" ont encore beaucoup de temps pour poster !



Réponse : Rack Your Brains and Help! 77 de here4u, postée le 12-09-2020 à 23:31:19 (S | E)
Hello, dear Friends and Workers,

Voici votre corrigé. Bravo à vous qui avez eu le courage de vous frotter à ce texte, qui n'était pas si facile. Je vous attends d'ailleurs (TROIS volontaires, please ) pour la traduction de ce passage dans le Follow up Work.

A bit of sunshine can cause many of us to dream(1) of ice cream, sunbathing and beaches, but warm weather (2) can also make us violent, grumpy and depressed. Why?
The earliest studies into the phenomenon emerged in the late 19th century, coinciding with the first reliable crime statistics.(3) According to one analysis, offences against people tended to peak in the summer months, while crimes against property were found to be more common in the winter. Since then, the evidence has(4) been piling up.(5) City riots are most common during good weather(2) and people are less likely to (6) take to the streets when it is raining. Every year, as the mercury rises, we undergo(7) a collective transformation. Some of the symptoms are relatively minor – people are more likely to (6) honk their horns when they’re stuck in traffic; the police usually notice (8) a spike in disorderly behaviour (9); and we’re less likely to (6) help strangers out. /// END of Part ONE/// Then there are the uprisings. In one study, scientists tracked uprisings around the world and found that the overwhelming majority occurred in the summer months. Whichever/ Whatever (10) end of the planet they looked at, the relationship still held up.
More recent studies have confirmed the link between social movements and the weather. While it’s clear that the injustices and other triggers for social unrest (11) can happen all year round, it seems that we’re far more likely to react when it’s warm. The relationship between heat and things like rioting is U-shaped. So when it becomes very hot or humid, people don't do anything because it's just too (12) uncomfortable to move.
Why the weather(2)has such power over our behaviour is a total mystery – but as the world heats up, scientists are racing to find some answers.There is plenty of evidence (4) that high temperatures make us more angry and stressed, and less happy. /// END Of Part TWO /// One of the most obvious possibilities is that hot,stuffy weather(2) is uncomfortable, which puts us in a collectively worse mood (14), and leads to harmful behaviour: high temperatures make us more angry and stressed, and less happy.

Climate change threatens to bring(15) more intense heatwaves, more often, so understanding the link between weather(2 )and behaviour is more important(16) than ever. (16) It has some uneasy implications for the future. Scientists have predicted that, as climate change kicks in, just a 2C increase in global average temperatures could increase the rate of violent crime (17)by more than 3% in temperate regions such as Western Europe. At the moment, many experts believe we’re on track for a temperature rise of over 3C, even if we meet all our current climate commitments. Why the weather (2) affects us remains a mystery, perhaps we’d better brace ourselves for (18 ) what’s coming./// END Of Text ///


(1) To cause someone TO DO something.
(2) Ne pas confondre WHETHER… OR et the WEATHER.
(3) the first reliable crime statistics: Mathematics is, as Jim Reynolds said, "singular despite being plural in form". There are various other words like it, including many other words ending in -ics such as physics, statistics, dynamics, ethics, linguistics, metaphysics, optics, economics... Forme plurielle mais verbe au singulier.
(4) «Evidence»= des preuves = indénombrable avec verbe au singulier.
(5) Since then … (indique que l’action a commencé dans le passé) the evidence has ben piling up… = present perfect en ing. L’action se poursuit dans le présent et on insiste sur la durée …
(6) To be likely to do something: Lien internet
Cette formule, très usuelle, vous a désarmés. Elle était reprise plusieurs fois dans le texte, ce qui en faisait un « must » Vous en avez oublié plusieurs …
(7) «Every year», indique une habitude et demande donc le présent simple (d’habitude).
(8) the police usually notice : police est utilisé non pas en tant qu’individu, mais en tant qu’institution (formée d’un grand nombre de membres=> verbe au pluriel. )
(9) spike in (disorderbehaviour : La juxtaposition des noms n’a pas de sens ici. Il faut un adverbe : disorderly behaviour.
(10) Whichever/ Whatever end of the planet= whichever indique un choix entre un nombre d’éléments réduits./// Whatever implique que les éléments parmi lesquels il faut choisir sont très nombreux.
(11) for social (disrest=> social unrest= social disorder.
(12) it's just (two uncomfortable=> it’s just TOO uncomfortable.
(13) is plenty of (evidenceS ... = plenty of evidence= des preuves => indénombrable singulier
(14) in a collectively worse mood : il ne fallait pas utiliser le superlatif « worst », mais un comparatif=> worse.
(15) Climate change( threatens bringing more intense heatwaves=> to threaten to do something
(16) behaviour is (most important than (never=> MORE important than EVER; il fallait un comparatif et ici, « jamais » a le sens positif = « ever »
(17) the (right of violent crime : right= le droit // rate= le taux.
(18) better brace ourselves for= to brace oneself FOR something.

Voilà ! Encore BRAVO et à tous. J'attends les volontaires (sans urgence!)




Réponse : Rack Your Brains and Help! 77 de chocolatcitron, postée le 12-09-2020 à 23:47:42 (S | E)
Rack Your Brains and Help! 77 samedi 12 septembre.
Message de here4u posté le 28-08-2020 à 22:29:39 (S | E | F)
Hello my dear Here4u : thanks!
Hi Everybody!

FINISHED !

18 fautes à trouver : oups, j’en ai trouvé 20, dont plein de redites !

Here is my work:
A bit of sunshine can cause many of us 1 TO DREAM of ice cream, sunbathing and beaches, but warm 2 WEATHER can also make us violent, grumpy and depressed. Why?
The earliest studies into the phenomenon emerged in the late 19th century, coinciding with the first reliable crime 3 STATISTICS. According to one analysis, offences against people tended to peak in the summer months, while crimes against property were found to be more common in the winter. Since then, the 4 EVIDENCE 5 HAS BEEN piling up. City riots are most common during good (2 BIS) WEATHER and people 6 ARE LESS LIKELY TO take to the streets when it is raining. Every year, as the mercury 7 RISES, we 8 UNDERGO a collective transformation. Some of the symptoms are relatively minor – (6 BIS) people ARE MORE LIKELY TO honk their horns when they’re 9 STUCK in traffic; the police usually 10 NOTICE a spike in 11 DISORDERLY behaviour; and we (6 TER) ARE LESS LIKELY TO help strangers out. /// END of Part ONE /// Then there are the uprisings. In one study, scientists tracked uprisings around the world and found that the overwhelming majority occurred in the summer months. 12 WHICHEVER end of the planet they looked at, the relationship still held up.
More recent studies have confirmed the link between social movements and the weather. While it’s clear that the injustices and other triggers for social 13 UNREST can happen all year round, it seems that we (6 QUARTE) ARE FARE MORE LIKELY TO react when it’s warm. The relationship between heat and things like rioting is U-shaped. So when it becomes very hot or humid, people don't do anything because it's just 14 TOO uncomfortable to move.
Why the (2 QUARTE) WEATHER has such power over our behaviour is a total mystery – but as the world heats up, scientists are racing to find some answers. There is plenty of (4 BIS) EVIDENCE that high temperatures make us 15 ANGRIER AND MORE STRESSED, and less happy. /// END of Part TWO /// One of the more obvious possibilities is that hot, stuffy (2 QUINTE) WEATHER is uncomfortable, which puts us in a collectively 16 WORSE mood, and leads to harmful behaviour: high temperatures make us more angry and stressed, and less happy.
Climate change threatens 17 TO BRING more intense heatwaves, more often, so understanding the link between (2 EXA) WEATHER and behaviour is 18 MORE IMPORTANT THAN 19 EVER. It has some uneasy implications for the future. Scientists have predicted that, as climate change kicks in, just a 2C increase in global average temperatures could increase the 20 RATE of violent crime by more than 3% in temperate regions such as Western Europe. At the moment, many experts believe we’re on track for a temperature rise of over 3C, even if we meet all our current climate commitments. Why the (2 EPTA) WEATHER affects us remains a mystery, perhaps we’d better brace ourselves on what’s coming. /// END of the Text ///.
(HERE'S THE FORCE! )
See you soon.



Réponse : Rack Your Brains and Help! 77 de chocolatcitron, postée le 12-09-2020 à 23:51:12 (S | E)
Hello my dear Here4u and thanks !
Hi everybody!

Je suis volontaire pour traduire l'ensemble de ce texte fort intéressant, car je n'ai pu, hélas, travailler ce forum dans les temps... !

FINISHED !

Here is my work:

THE FIRST PART:
A bit of sunshine can cause many of us to dream(1) of ice cream, sunbathing and beaches, but warm weather (2) can also make us violent, grumpy and depressed. Why?
The earliest studies into the phenomenon emerged in the late 19th century, coinciding with the first reliable crime statistics.(3) According to one analysis, offences against people tended to peak in the summer months, while crimes against property were found to be more common in the winter. Since then, the evidence has(4) been piling up.(5) City riots are most common during good weather(2) and people are less likely to (6) take to the streets when it is raining. Every year, as the mercury rises, we undergo(7) a collective transformation. Some of the symptoms are relatively minor – people are more likely to (6) honk their horns when they’re stuck in traffic; the police usually notice (8) a spike in disorderly behaviour (9); and we’re less likely to (6) help strangers out. /// END of Part ONE///

Un peu de soleil peut faire rêver beaucoup d’entre nous(1) de crème glacée, de bronzage et de plages, mais le temps chaud (2) peut aussi nous rendre violents, grincheux et déprimés. Pourquoi?
Les premières études sur le phénomène ont vu le jour à la fin du XIXe siècle, coïncidant avec les premières statistiques fiables sur la criminalité. (3) Selon une analyse, les infractions contre les personnes avaient tendance à atteindre un sommet en période estivale, tandis que les crimes contre les biens étaient plus fréquents en hiver. Depuis lors, les preuves s’accumulent.4. (5) Les émeutes urbaines sont plus fréquentes par beau temps(2) et les gens sont moins susceptibles de (6) descendre dans la rue quand il pleut. Chaque année, au fur et à mesure que le mercure monte, nous subissons(7) une transformation collective. Certains symptômes sont relativement mineurs – les gens sont plus enclin à (6) klaxonner lorsqu’ils sont coincés dans la circulation ; la police remarque habituellement (8) un pic de comportement désordonné (9); et nous sommes moins susceptibles (6) d’aider les étrangers. END de la partie ONE///


THE SECOND PART:
Then there are the uprisings. In one study, scientists tracked uprisings around the world and found that the overwhelming majority occurred in the summer months. Whichever/ Whatever (10) end of the planet they looked at, the relationship still held up.
More recent studies have confirmed the link between social movements and the weather. While it’s clear that the injustices and other triggers for social unrest (11) can happen all year round, it seems that we’re far more likely to react when it’s warm. The relationship between heat and things like rioting is U-shaped. So when it becomes very hot or humid, people don't do anything because it's just too (12) uncomfortable to move.
Why the weather(2)has such power over our behaviour is a total mystery – but as the world heats up, scientists are racing to find some answers. There is plenty of evidence (4) that high temperatures make us more angry and stressed, and less happy. /// END Of Part TWO ///

Ensuite, il y a les soulèvements. Dans une étude, les scientifiques ont suivi les soulèvements à travers le monde et ont constaté que l’écrasante majorité s’est produite pendant la période estivale. Quel que soit le lieu de la planète qu’ils ont analysé, la relation l’a toujours démontré.
Des études plus récentes ont confirmé le lien entre les mouvements sociaux et la météo. Bien qu’il soit clair que les injustices et autres déclencheurs de troubles sociaux (11) peuvent se produire toute l’année, il semble que nous sommes beaucoup plus enclins à réagir quand il fait chaud. La relation entre la chaleur et des choses comme les émeutes est en forme de U. Donc, quand ça devient très chaud ou humide, les gens ne font rien parce que c’est juste trop (12) inconfortable de se déplacer.
Pourquoi la météo(2) a un tel pouvoir sur notre comportement est un mystère total – mais comme le monde se réchauffe, les scientifiques se dépêchent pour trouver des réponses. Il existe de nombreuses preuves (4) que les températures élevées nous rendent plus en colère et stressés, et moins heureux. FIN DE LA PARTIE DEUX ///


THE THIRD PART:
One of the most obvious possibilities is that hot,stuffy weather(2) is uncomfortable, which puts us in a collectively worse mood (14), and leads to harmful behaviour: high temperatures make us more angry and stressed, and less happy.

Climate change threatens to bring(15) more intense heatwaves, more often, so understanding the link between weather(2 )and behaviour is more important(16) than ever. (16) It has some uneasy implications for the future. Scientists have predicted that, as climate change kicks in, just a 2C increase in global average temperatures could increase the rate of violent crime (17)by more than 3% in temperate regions such as Western Europe. At the moment, many experts believe we’re on track for a temperature rise of over 3C, even if we meet all our current climate commitments. Why the weather (2) affects us remains a mystery, perhaps we’d better brace ourselves for (18 ) what’s coming./// END Of Text ///

L’une des possibilités les plus évidentes est que le temps chaud et étouffant(2) est inconfortable, ce qui nous empire collectivement notre humeur (14), et conduit à des comportements destructeurs : les températures élevées nous rendent plus en colère et stressé, et moins heureux.

Le changement climatique menace d’entraîner des vagues de chaleur plus intenses, plus souvent, de sorte que la compréhension du lien entre les conditions météorologiques(2) et le comportement est plus importante(16) que jamais. (16) Il a des implications difficiles pour l’avenir. Les scientifiques ont prédit qu’à mesure que le changement climatique entre en vigueur, juste une augmentation de 2°C des températures moyennes mondiales pourrait augmenter le taux de crimes violents (17) de plus de 3 % dans les régions tempérées comme en Europe occidentale. Pour l’instant, de nombreux experts estiment que nous sommes sur la bonne voie pour une hausse de température de plus de 3°C, même si nous respectons tous nos engagements climatiques actuels. Pourquoi la météo (2) nous affecte reste un mystère, peut-être que nous ferions mieux de nous préparer à (18 ) notre avenir./// FIN De Texte ///

Have an extremely sweet week, each of You ! Take care...
Here is the force, especially for Here4u!
See you soon.



Réponse : Rack Your Brains and Help! 77 de maxwell, postée le 13-09-2020 à 06:29:19 (S | E)
FINISHED

Hello!
Follow-up work:

Part I:
A bit of sunshine can cause many of us to dream of ice cream, sunbathing and beaches, but warm weather can also make us violent, grumpy and depressed. Why?
The earliest studies into the phenomenon emerged in the late 19th century, coinciding with the first reliable crime statistics. According to one analysis, offences against people tended to peak in the summer months, while crimes against property were found to be more common in the winter. Since then, the evidence has been piling up. City riots are most common during good weather and people are less likely to take to the streets when it is raining. Every year, as the mercury rises, we undergo a collective transformation. Some of the symptoms are relatively minor – people are more likely to honk their horns when they’re stuck in traffic; the police usually notice a spike in disorderly behaviour; and we’re less likely to help strangers out.

Quelques rayons de soleil peuvent amener nombre d'entre nous à rêver de crème glacée, de bains de soleil et de plages, mais un temps chaud peut nous rendre violents, grincheux et déprimés. Pourquoi ?
Les premières études sur le phénomène apparurent à la fin du XIXe siècle, ce qui coïncide avec les premières statistiques fiables sur la criminalité. Selon une analyse, les atteintes aux personnes avaient tendance à atteindre un pic durant les mois estivaux, tandis que les atteintes aux biens s'avéraient plus habituelles en hiver. Depuis lors, les preuves se sont accumulées. Les émeutes urbaines sont plus fréquentes par beau temps, et les gens sont moins enclins à descendre dans la rue lorsqu'il pleut. Tous les ans, lorsque le mercure monte, nous subissons une transformation collective. Certains des symptômes sont relativement mineurs -les gens sont plus susceptibles de klaxonner quand ils sont coincés dans un embouteillage ; la police remarque en général un pic de troubles à l'ordre public ; et nous sommes moins susceptibles d'aider des inconnus.

Part II:

Then there are the uprisings. In one study, scientists tracked uprisings around the world and found that the overwhelming majority occurred in the summer months. Whatever end of the planet they looked at, the relationship still held up.
More recent studies have confirmed the link between social movements and the weather. While it’s clear that the injustices and other triggers for social unrest can happen all year round, it seems that we’re far more likely to react when it’s warm. The relationship between heat and things like rioting is U-shaped. So when it becomes very hot or humid, people don't do anything because it's just too uncomfortable to move.
Why the weather has such power over our behaviour is a total mystery – but as the world heats up, scientists are racing to find some answers. There is plenty of evidence that high temperatures make us more angry and stressed, and less happy.

Et puis, il y a les révoltes. Dans une étude, les scientifiques ont suivi les soulèvements de par le monde et ont découvert que l'écrasante majorité avait lieu durant les mois d'été. Quel que soit le lieu d'observation dans le monde, la relation était toujours valable.
Des études plus récentes ont confirmé le lien entre les mouvements sociaux et le temps. S'il est clair que les injustices et autres déclencheurs de troubles sociaux peuvent survenir à tout moment dans l'année, il semble que nous soyons bien plus susceptibles de réagir quand il fait chaud. La relation entre la chaleur et des phénomènes comme les émeutes est en forme de U. Donc quand il commence à faire très chaud ou humide, les gens ne font rien parce que ça devient trop désagréable de bouger. La raison pour laquelle le temps a un tel pouvoir sur notre comportement est un mystère total, mais comme la planète se réchauffe, les scientifiques s'empressent de trouver des réponses. Force est de constater que des températures élevées nous rendent furieux, stressés et moins heureux.

Part III:
One of the most obvious possibilities is that hot, stuffy weather is uncomfortable, which puts us in a collectively worse mood and leads to harmful behaviour: high temperatures make us more angry and stressed, and less happy.
Climate change threatens to bring more intense heatwaves, more often, so understanding the link between weather and behaviour is more important than ever. It has some uneasy implications for the future. Scientists have predicted that, as climate change kicks in, just a 2C increase in global average temperatures could increase the rate of violent crime by more than 3% in temperate regions such as Western Europe. At the moment, many experts believe we’re on track for a temperature rise of over 3C, even if we meet all our current climate commitments. Why the weather affects us remains a mystery, perhaps we’d better brace ourselves for what’s coming.

L'une des possibilités les plus évidentes est qu'un temps chaud et étouffant est inconfortable, ce qui nous met collectivement de plus mauvaise humeur et conduit à des comportements nuisibles : des températures élevées nous rendent furieux, stressés et moins heureux.
Le changement climatique menace d'occasionner des vagues de chaleur plus intenses, plus souvent, et donc il est plus important que jamais de comprendre le lien entre le temps et le comportement. Il a des incidences difficiles pour l'avenir. Les scientifiques ont prédit que, à mesure que le changement climatique se fait sentir, une simple augmentation de 2°C dans les températures moyennes globales pourrait accroître le taux de crimes violents de plus de 3% dans des régions tempérées comme l'Europe occidentale. En ce moment, de nombreux experts pensent que nous sommes sur la trajectoire d'une augmentation de température de plus de 3°C, même si nous respectons tous nos engagements climatiques actuels. La raison pour laquelle le temps nous influence reste un mystère, peut-être ferions-nous mieux de nous préparer à ce qui va arriver.



Réponse : Rack Your Brains and Help! 77 de here4u, postée le 14-09-2020 à 17:00:54 (S | E)
Hello, Dears,

TRAVAIL TERMINE

A bit of sunshine can cause many of us to dream of ice cream, sunbathing and beaches, but warm weather can also make us violent, grumpy and depressed. Why?
The earliest studies into the phenomenon emerged in the late 19th century, coinciding with the first reliable crime statistics. According to one analysis, offences against people tended to peak in the summer months, while crimes against property were found to be more common in the winter. Since then, the evidence has been piling up. City riots are most common during good weather and people are less likely to take to the streets when it is raining. Every year, as the mercury rises, we undergo a collective transformation. Some of the symptoms are relatively minor – people are more likely to honk their horns when they’re stuck in traffic; the police usually notice a spike in disorderly behaviour; and we’re less likely to help strangers out.

1A) Un peu de soleil peut faire rêver beaucoup d’entre nous de crème glacée, de bronzage et de plages, mais le temps chaud peut aussi nous rendre violents, grincheux et déprimés. Pourquoi ?
Les premières études sur le phénomène ont vu le jour à la fin du XIXe siècle, coïncidant avec les premières statistiques fiables sur la criminalité. Selon une analyse, les infractions contre les personnes avaient tendance à atteindre un sommet en période estivale, tandis que les crimes ("infractions" conviendrait mieux ici... )a crime= un délit!) contre les biens étaient plus fréquents en hiver. Depuis lors, les preuves s’accumulent. Les émeutes urbaines sont plus fréquentes par beau temps et les gens sont moins susceptibles de descendre dans la rue quand il pleut. Chaque année, au fur et à mesure que le mercure monte, nous subissons une transformation collective. Certains symptômes sont relativement mineurs – les gens sont plus enclin à klaxonner lorsqu’ils sont coincés dans la circulation ; la police remarque habituellement un pic de comportement désordonné ; et nous sommes moins susceptibles d’aider les étrangers.
et Choco ! C'est Très Bien !

1B) Quelques rayons de soleil peuvent amener nombre d'entre nous à rêver de crème glacée, de bains de soleil et de plages, mais un temps chaud peut aussi nous rendre violents, grincheux et déprimés. Pourquoi ?
Les premières études sur le phénomène apparurent à la fin du XIXe siècle, ce qui coïncide avec les premières statistiques fiables sur la criminalité. Selon une analyse, les atteintes aux personnes avaient tendance à atteindre un pic durant les mois estivaux, tandis que les atteintes aux biens s'avéraient plus habituelles en hiver. Depuis lors, les preuves se sont accumulées. Les émeutes urbaines sont plus fréquentes par beau temps, et les gens sont moins enclins à descendre dans la rue lorsqu'il pleut. Tous les ans, lorsque le mercure monte, nous subissons une transformation collective. Certains des symptômes sont relativement mineurs -les gens sont plus susceptibles de klaxonner quand ils sont coincés dans un embouteillage ; la police remarque en général un pic de troubles à l'ordre public ; et nous sommes moins susceptibles d'aider des inconnus.
Merci, Max. Une très bonne première partie.

Then there are the uprisings. In one study, scientists tracked uprisings around the world and found that the overwhelming majority occurred in the summer months. Whichever/ Whatever end of the planet they looked at, the relationship still held up.
More recent studies have confirmed the link between social movements and the weather. While it’s clear that the injustices and other triggers for social unrest can happen all year round, it seems that we’re far more likely to react when it’s warm. The relationship between heat and things like rioting is U-shaped. So when it becomes very hot or humid, people don't do anything because it's just too uncomfortable to move.
Why the weather has such power over our behaviour is a total mystery – but as the world heats up, scientists are racing to find some answers. There is plenty of evidence that high temperatures make us more angry and stressed, and less happy.

2A) Ensuite, il y a les soulèvements. Dans une étude, les scientifiques ont suivi les soulèvements à travers le monde et ont constaté que l’écrasante majorité s’est produite pendant la période estivale. TBonne phrase ! Quel que soit le lieu de la planète qu’ils ont analysé, la relation l’a toujours démontré.
Des études plus récentes ont confirmé le lien entre les mouvements sociaux et la météo. Bien qu’il soit clair que les injustices et autres déclencheurs de troubles sociaux peuvent se produire toute l’année, il semble que nous sommes beaucoup plus enclins à réagir quand il fait chaud. La relation entre la chaleur et des choses (événements?) comme les émeutes est en forme de U. Donc, quand ça devient très chaud ou humide, les gens ne font rien parce que c’est juste trop inconfortable de se déplacer.
Pourquoi la météo a un tel pouvoir sur notre comportement est un mystère total – mais comme le monde se réchauffe, les scientifiques se dépêchent pour trouver des réponses. Il existe de nombreuses preuves que les températures élevées nous rendent plus en colère et stressés, et moins heureux.
Très bonne traduction, Choco !

2B) Et puis, il y a les révoltes. Dans une étude, les scientifiques ont suivi les soulèvements de par le monde et ont découvert que l'écrasante majorité avait lieu durant les mois d'été. Quel que soit le lieu d'observation dans le monde, la relation était toujours valable.(Le résultat était toujours ...)
Des études plus récentes ont confirmé le lien entre les mouvements sociaux et le temps. S'il est clair que les injustices et autres déclencheurs de troubles sociaux peuvent survenir à tout moment dans l'année, il semble que nous soyons bien plus susceptibles de réagir quand il fait chaud. La relation entre la chaleur et des phénomènes comme les émeutes est en forme de U. Donc quand il commence à faire très chaud ou humide, les gens ne font rien parce que ça devient trop désagréable de bouger. La raison pour laquelle le temps a un tel pouvoir sur notre comportement est un mystère total, mais comme la planète se réchauffe, les scientifiques s'empressent de trouver des réponses. Force est de constater que des températures élevées nous rendent furieux, stressés et moins heureux.
C'est aussi une très bonne traduction, Max !

One of the most obvious possibilities is that hot, stuffy weather is uncomfortable, which puts us in a collectively worse mood, and leads to harmful behaviour: high temperatures make us more angry and stressed, and less happy.

Climate change threatens to bring more intense heatwaves, more often, so understanding the link between weather and behaviour is more important than ever. It has some uneasy implications for the future. Scientists have predicted that, as climate change kicks in, just a 2C increase in global average temperatures could increase the rate of violent crime by more than 3% in temperate regions such as Western Europe. At the moment, many experts believe we’re on track for a temperature rise of over 3C, even if we meet all our current climate commitments. Why the weather affects us remains a mystery, perhaps we’d better brace ourselves for what’s coming.

3A) L’une des possibilités les plus évidentes est que le temps chaud et étouffant est inconfortable, ce qui nous empire collectivement notre humeur, et conduit à des comportements destructeurs : les températures élevées nous rendent plus en colère et stresséS, et moins heureux.
Le changement climatique menace d’entraîner des vagues de chaleur plus intenses, plus souvent, de sorte que la compréhension du lien entre les conditions météorologiques et le comportement est plus importante que jamais. Il a des implications difficiles pour l’avenir. Les scientifiques ont prédit qu’à mesure que le changement climatique entre en vigueur, juste une une simple augmentation de 2°C des températures moyennes mondiales pourrait augmenter le taux de crimes violents de plus de 3 % dans les régions tempérées comme en Europe occidentale. Pour l’instant, de nombreux experts estiment que nous sommes sur la bonne voie pour une hausse de température de plus de 3°C, même si nous respectons tous nos engagements climatiques actuels. Pourquoi la météo nous affecte reste un mystère, peut-être que nous ferions mieux de nous préparer à( un peu faible pour brace ourselves) notre avenir.
Bravo, Choco! C'est une très bonne traduction !

3B) L'une des possibilités les plus évidentes est qu'un temps chaud et étouffant est inconfortable, ce qui nous met collectivement de plus mauvaise humeur et conduit à des comportements nuisibles : des températures élevées nous rendent furieux, stressés et moins heureux.
Le changement climatique menace d'occasionner des vagues de chaleur plus intenses, plus souvent, et donc il est plus important que jamais de comprendre le lien entre le temps et le comportement. Il a des incidences difficiles pour l'avenir. Les scientifiques ont prédit que, à mesure que le changement climatique se fait sentir, une simple augmentation de 2°C dans les températures moyennes globales pourrait accroître le taux de crimes violents de plus de 3% dans des régions tempérées comme l'Europe occidentale. En ce moment, de nombreux experts pensent que nous sommes sur la trajectoire d'une augmentation de température de plus de 3°C, même si nous respectons tous nos engagements climatiques actuels. La raison pour laquelle le temps nous influence reste un mystère, peut-être ferions-nous mieux de nous préparer(je verrais mieux quelque chose qui montrerait plus l'effort à fournir : "nous accrocher"/ "serrer les poings"/ ou ? qui impliquerait mieux le choc auquel nous allons devoir faire face ...) à ce qui va arriver.
Très bien compris Maxwell ! Très bonne traduction. BRAVO !

Un énorme BRAVO et à vous tous et encore plus à nos volontaires !



Réponse : Rack Your Brains and Help! 77 de alpiem, postée le 15-09-2020 à 19:17:17 (S | E)
Ex 186/Back home, but not to normal

hello, everybody


1) Translate into English:

1. Maxwell : Il s'est mis la pression pour terminer premier et a caracolé en tête. Maintenant, tous les projecteurs sont braqués sur lui : c'est la rançon de la gloire/du succès...
He has put pressure on himself to get to the top and has been prancing in the lead. Presently
all the spotlight is on him :it's the price of success.



2.Maxwell : "Un pour tous, tous pour un ": telle était la devise des Trois Mousquetaires. Chacun pourrait la faire sienne, s'il voulait. Maxwell!

"One for all, all for one" such was the Three Musqueteers'motto. Everyone could make it it's own if possible.



3. Cet après-midi était très agréable. Tous les jours ne peuvent pas être aussi bons que celui-ci, mais tu m'as aidé à ne pas penser à mes soucis? (éviter de traduire littéralemen

That afternoon was most pleasant. Every day must not be as good as that one but you have
helped me to keep my mind off of my worries.

4. La prochaine fois que tu auras envie de lever le poing et de frapper, tu ferais mieux d'ouvrir la bouche et de parler.

Next time you fancy to wave your fist and punch,you'd better open your mouth and speak.



5. « Je m'informe sur les faits-divers ? mais c'est impossible de garder le rythme ! Il y a tellement de nouvelles ! Le pire est qu'elles changent constamment ! Si tout pouvait s'arrêter ? disons une journée ? j'arriverais peut-être à rattraper ! »

"I'm investigating on the various facts? but I failed to keep up the pace! There are such a lot of news !The worst is that they always keep changing ! I wish all that would get
to a stop?
Say, one daylong ? Maybe I might be able to catch up !" .




6. « Je n'arrête pas d'essayer d'aider les autres, mais en fait, à chaque fois, j'empire les choses ? » « C'est ce que font les héros ? »
"I can't stop trying to help others, but actually, each time I do make things worse ?
" Well, that's what heroes do ?"


7. Quiconque ne tire pas de leçon du passé est simplement condamné à le répéter ?

Whoever (doesn't learn from the past /forgets the lessons of the past) is just condemned to
repeat them.



8. « Ce sablé à la fraise ? Un pur délice ! C'est à en mourir ! »

"That strawberry shortbread ? A sheer delight ! It's to die for !"


II) Optional : Comment on either sentence 4, or 7, in 100 to 120 words. (je sais que vous aimez les petites expressions ... )



Réponse : Rack Your Brains and Help! 77 de here4u, postée le 16-09-2020 à 17:11:35 (S | E)
Hello!
(It's never too late, Alpiem! You must have received your correction yesterday! Very well done. )




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