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Rack Your Brains and Help/84

Cours gratuits > Forum > Exercices du forum || En bas

[POSTER UNE NOUVELLE REPONSE] [Suivre ce sujet]


Rack Your Brains and Help/84
Message de here4u posté le 11-12-2020 à 21:40:25 (S | E | F)
Hello, Dear courageous workers,

PLEASE, HELP MY POOR STUDENT; There are mistakes in this text...
He has tried hard, but has left 13 mistakes. Can you help him find and correct them?
It's a and the correction will be online on Sunday, December 27.


«It’s a such great feeling. It’s like being reborne again, or putting on a different skin. We’re nearly naked. So we’re all egual in the hot tub.» For Icelanders it’s though being a part of the population’s wellbeing, to have an access to an outdoor swimming pool. «You can relax, enjoy the hot water. So, I think it brings out positive feelings : a feeling of wellbeing…»
Many Icelanders start their day by a swim before work. «I usually do ten to twelve rounds every day, and after I go to the sauna and after the hot pots. And after I go to work. I’m a park ranger, so I need to be fit. At work, you usually talk a lot about something related with work. And here, you can get to know people outside work: it’s kind of more personal talk. I think many Icelanders look upon the swimming pool as being an obligation: if you have a small town, you have the church, you have the museum, and you have the swimming pool. We have those images of great swimmers. As we are an island nation, swimming has been important for us in many ways. ///END of Part One/// We’re a fishing nation, so our lives depended of being able to swim. In 1940, Iceland made mandatory swimming lessons. People had witnessed fishermen actually drawing by the shoreline, so of course, being obligated to learn how to swim made sense.»
Iceland sits on a hotbed of geothermal energy. Naturally heated water feeds hot tubs throughout the country. We look at the swimming pools as part of the public health policy in Iceland, both in terms of teaching our kids how to swim, also having all kinds of activities for senior citizens and regular people to go to swim.
It’s really nice to get in the hot tubs after ocean swimming, especially when the ocean is quite cold, then we get in here and we warm up, and the hot tub is also where the party is going on, so everybody is happy and talkative, and here is a place to meet lots of new friends, in a healthy way. When you’re sitting in a hot tub, there’s no classification.///END of Part Two/// You have to take all your clothes off besides everybody. You leave your status outside, there’s no VIP section, everybody’s the same. You have to leave your cell phone outside, so people are compelled to start to talk to others.
Most of the swimming pools are outdoors in Iceland. The ocean is very cold (maybe four degrees)and then the pools are hot(38/ 39°)… It’s such a great feeling. It’s high quality water and it’s a luxury to be able to use it to bath in. «This fjord is amazing. It’s very quiet and calm. It has a lot of wild animals. Sometimes you see foxes running around, sometimes there are whales, dolphins. It’s just a great place to recharge and meditate.
Maybe we are a little bit free-spirited in that way.»/// END of the Text ///

I give you THE FORCE...


Réponse : Rack Your Brains and Help/84 de taiji43, postée le 18-12-2020 à 17:45:07 (S | E)
Dear Her4U
Here is my correction . I did my best, hoping not to have added mistakes Fortunately we have a corrector who supervises!

READY TO BE CORRECTED
It’s SUCH A great feeling. It’s like being REBORN ( pas de e) again, or putting on a different skin. We’re nearly naked. So we’re all egual in the hot tub.» For Icelanders it’s THOUGHT being a part of the population’s wellbeing, to have access to an outdoor swimming pool. «You can relax, enjoy the hot water. So, I think it brings out positive feelings : a feeling of wellbeing…»

Many Icelanders start their day WITH a swim before WORKING. «I usually do ten to twelve rounds every day, and after I go to the sauna and after the hot pots. And after I go to work. I’m a park ranger, so I need to be fit. At work, you usually talk a lot about something related TO work. And here, you can get to know people outside OF work: it’s MORE THAN A kind of more personal talk. (c’est plus qu’une sorte de OK) I think many Icelanders look upon the swimming pool as being an obligation: if you have a small town, you have the church, you have the museum, and you have the swimming pool. We have those images of great swimmers. As we are an island nation, swimming has been important for us in many ways. ///END of Part One///

We’re a fishing nation, so our lives depended ON being able to swim. In 1940, Iceland made mandatory swimming lessons MANDATORY ( adverbe à la fin ). People had witnessed fishermen actually drawing DROWNING ( se noyant) by the shoreline, so of course, being obligated to learn how to swim made sense.»

Iceland sits on a hotbed of geothermal energy. Naturally heated water feeds hot tubs throughout the country. We look at the swimming pools as part of the public health policy, in Iceland, , both in terms of teaching our kids how to swim, THAN also having all kinds of activities for senior citizens and regular people to go FOR A swim.OR TO GO SWIMMING
It’s really nice to get INTO the hot tubs after ocean swimming, especially when the ocean is quite cold, then we get in here and we warm up, and the hot tub is also where the party is going on, so everybody is happy and talkative, and here is a place to meet lots of new friends, in a healthy way. When you’re sitting in a hot tub, there’s no classification.///END of Part Two///

You have to take all your clothes off BESIDE everybody.You leave your status outside, there’s no VIP section, everybody’s the same. You have to leave your cell phone outside, so people are compelled to start TALKING to THE others.
Most of the swimming pools are OUTDOOR in Iceland. The ocean is very cold (maybe four degrees) and then the pools are hot(38/ 39°)… It’s such a great feeling. It’s high quality water and it’s a luxury to be able to TO BE ALLOW to use it to bath IN IT «This fjord is amazing. It’s very quiet and calm. It has a lot of wild animals. Sometimes you see foxes running around, sometimes there are whales, dolphins. It’s just a great place to recharge and meditate.
Maybe we are a little bit free-spirited in that way.»/// END of the Text ///



Réponse : Rack Your Brains and Help/84 de maxwell, postée le 19-12-2020 à 07:23:31 (S | E)
READY TO BE CORRECTED
Hello!
I don't know whether I did well or not but I did what I could Thanks again
Help My Student:
«It’s such A great feeling. It’s like being REBORN again, or putting on a different skin. We’re nearly naked. So we’re all egual in the hot tub.» For Icelanders it’s STILL part of the population’s wellbeing to have [] access to an outdoor swimming pool. «You can relax, enjoy the hot water. So, I think it brings out positive feelings : a feeling of wellbeing…»
Many Icelanders start their day by a swim before work. «I usually do ten to twelve rounds every day, and after THAT, I go to the sauna and THEN TO the hot SPOT. And AFTERWARDS, I go to work. I’m a park ranger, so I need to be fit. At work, you usually talk a lot about something related TO work. And here, you can get to know people outside work:  it’s kind of more personal TALKING. I think many Icelanders look upon the swimming pool as being an obligation: if you have a small town, you have the church, you have the museum, and you have the swimming pool. We have those images of great swimmers. As we are an island nation, swimming has been important for us in many ways. ///END of Part One/// We’re a fishing nation, so our lives HAVE depended ON being able to swim. In 1940, Iceland made mandatory swimming lessons. People had witnessed fishermen actually DROWNING by the shoreline, so of course, being obligated to learn how to swim made sense.»
Iceland sits on a hotbed of geothermal energy. Naturally heated water feeds hot tubs throughout the country. We look UPON the swimming pools as part of the public health policy in Iceland, both in terms of teaching our kids how to swim, AND having all kinds of activities for senior citizens and regular people to go SWIMMING.
It’s really nice to get in the hot tubs after ocean swimming, especially when the ocean is quite cold, then we get in here and we warm up, and the hot tub is also where the party is going on, so everybody is happy and talkative, and THIS is a place to meet lots of new friends, in a healthy way. When you’re sitting in a hot tub, there’s no classification.///END of Part Two/// You have to take all your clothes off BESIDE everybody. 
You leave your status outside, there’s no VIP section, everybody’s the same. You have to leave your cell phone outside, so people are compelled to start to talk to others.
Most of the swimming pools are outdoors in Iceland. The ocean is very cold (maybe four degrees)and then the pools are hot(38/ 39°)… It’s such a great feeling. It’s high quality water and it’s a luxury to be able to use it to bath in. «This fjord is amazing. It’s very quiet and calm. It has a lot of wild animals. Sometimes you see foxes running around, sometimes there are whales, dolphins. It’s just a great place to recharge and meditate.
Maybe we are a little bit free-spirited in that way.»/// END of the Text ///



Réponse : Rack Your Brains and Help/84 de joe39, postée le 21-12-2020 à 11:40:32 (S | E)
Hello dear here4u,
After swimming twelve lengths in an Olympic swimming pool (I wish it were like this), I send you my work, ready to be examined.
13 mistakes

«It’s SUCH A GREAT feeling. It’s like being REBORN again, or putting on a different skin. We’re nearly naked. So we’re all EQUAL in the hot tub.» For Icelanders it’s THOUGHT being a part of the population’s wellbeing, to have an access to an outdoor swimming pool. «You can relax, enjoy the hot water. So, I think it brings out positive feeling : a feeling of wellbeing…»
Many Icelanders start their day HAVING a swim before work. «I usually SWIM TEN TO TWELVE LENGTHS every day, and THEN I go to the sauna and THEN TO THE HOT TUB And THEN I go to work. I’m a park ranger, so I need to be fit. At work, you usually talk a lot about something related TO -WORK And here, you can get to know people outside work: it’s A KIND OF -MORE PERSONAL TALKING . I think many Icelanders look upon the swimming pool as being an obligation: if you have a small town, you have the church, you have the museum, and you have the swimming pool. We have those images of great swimmers. As we are an island nation, swimming has been important for us in many ways. ///END of Part One///
We’re a fishing nation, so our lives depended ON being able to swim. In 1940, Iceland made swimming lessons OBLIGATORY. People had witnessed fishermen actually DROWNING by the shoreline, so of course, being obligated to learn how to swim made sense.»
Iceland sits on a hotbed of geothermal energy. Naturally heated water feeds hot tubs throughout the country. We look at the swimming pools as part of the public health policy in Iceland, both in terms of teaching our kids how to swim, also having all kinds of activities for senior citizens and regular people to go to swim.
It’s really nice to get in the hot tubs after ocean swimming, especially when the ocean is quite cold, then we get in here and we warm up, and the hot tub is also where the party is going on, so everybody is happy and talkative, and here is a place to meet lots of new friends, in a healthy way. When you’re sitting in a hot tub, there’s no classification. ///END of Part Two///
You have to take all your clothes off IN THE MIDST OF EVERYONE. You leave your status outside, there’s no VIP section, everybody’s the same. You have to leave your cell phone outside, so people are compelled to start to talk to others.
Most of the swimming pools are outdoors in Iceland. The ocean is very cold (maybe four degrees ) and then the pools are 38°-39° DEGREES HOT - 12… It’s such a great feeling. It’s high quality water and it’s a luxury to be able to use it TO GET RELAXED. «This fjord is amazing. It’s very quiet and calm. It has a lot of wild animals. Sometimes you see foxes running around, sometimes there are whales, dolphins. It’s just a great place to recharge and meditate.
Maybe we are a little bit SPIRITED UP 13 in that way.»/// END of the Text ///
Your excerpt gave me the vision of another world and I thank you, wishing you a pleasant day. Take care.
So long.
Joe39



Réponse : Rack Your Brains and Help/84 de alpiem, postée le 22-12-2020 à 18:25:38 (S | E)
Rack Your Brains and Help/84 long is the way READY TO BE CORRECTED
Message de here4u posté le 11-12-2020 à 21:40:25 (S | E | F)

«It’s a such great feeling. It’s like being reborne again, or putting on a different skin. We’re nearly naked. So we’re all egual in the hot tub.» For Icelanders it’s though being a part of the population’s wellbeing, to have an access to an outdoor swimming pool. «You can relax, enjoy the hot water. So, I think it brings out positive feelings : a feeling of wellbeing…»
Many Icelanders start their day by a swim before work. «I usually do ten to twelve rounds every day, and after I go to the sauna and after the hot pots. And after I go to work. I’m a park ranger, so I need to be fit. At work, you usually talk a lot about something related with work. And here, you can get to know people outside work: it’s kind of more personal talk. I think many Icelanders look upon the swimming pool as being an obligation: if you have a small town, you have the church, you have the museum, and you have the swimming pool. We have those images of great swimmers. As we are an island nation, swimming has been important for us in many ways. ///END of Part One/// We’re a fishing nation, so our lives depended of being able to swim. In 1940, Iceland made mandatory swimming lessons. People had witnessed fishermen actually drawing by the shoreline, so of course, being obligated to learn how to swim made sense.»
Iceland sits on a hotbed of geothermal energy. Naturally heated water feeds hot tubs throughout the country. We look at the swimming pools as part of the public health policy in Iceland, both in terms of teaching our kids how to swim, also having all kinds of activities for senior citizens and regular people to go to swim.
It’s really nice to get in the hot tubs after ocean swimming, especially when the ocean is quite cold, then we get in here and we warm up, and the hot tub is also where the party is going on, so everybody is happy and talkative, and here is a place to meet lots of new friends, in a healthy way. When you’re sitting in a hot tub, there’s no classification.///END of Part Two/// You have to take all your clothes off besides everybody. You leave your status outside, there’s no VIP section, everybody’s the same. You have to leave your cell phone outside, so people are compelled to start to talk to others.
Most of the swimming pools are outdoors in Iceland. The ocean is very cold (maybe four degrees)and then the pools are hot(38/ 39°)… It’s such a great feeling. It’s high quality water and it’s a luxury to be able to use it to bath in. «This fjord is amazing. It’s very quiet and calm. It has a lot of wild animals. Sometimes you see foxes running around, sometimes there are whales, dolphins. It’s just a great place to recharge and meditate.
Maybe we are a little bit free-spirited in that way.»/// END of the Text ///

"It's SUCH A great feeling.It's like being REBORN,or like putting on a different skin.We're nearly naked. So we're
all EQUAL in the hot tub."

For Icelanders it's AS THOUGH being a part of the population's wellbeing: HAVING an access to an outdoor swimming
pool.

"You can relax, enjoy the hot water. So, I think it brings out positive feelings: a feeling of wellbeing...".

Many Icelanders start their days by a swim before work."I usually do ten to twelve rounds every day,and after
I go to the sauna and after,the hot pots.And after,I go to work. I'm a park ranger, so I need to be fit.

At work you usually talk a lot about something related with work.And here, you get to know people FROM outside
work: It's kind of more personal talk.

I think many Icelanders look upon the swimming pool as being an obligation:if you have a small town, you have the church, you have the museum, and you have the swimming pool.
We have those images of great swimmers. As we are an island nation, swimming has been important for us in many
ways.///END of part one///

We're a fishing nation, so our lives DEPEND ON being able to swim. In 1940,ICELAND MADE SWIMMING LESSONS MANDATORY.People had witnessed fishermen actually DROWNING by the shoreline, WHICH of course obligated THEM INTO LEARNING how swimming MAKES sense.

Iceland sits on a hotbed of geothermal energy.Naturally heated water feeds hot tubs throughout the country.
We look at the swimming pools as part of the public health policy in Iceland, both in terms of teaching our
kids how to swim, also having all kinds of activities for senior citisens and regular people GOING TO SWIM.

It's really nice to get INTO the hot tubs after ocean swimming, especially when the ocean is quite cold,then we
get in here and we warm up, and the hot tub is also where the party is going on, so everybody is happy and
talkative , and here is a place to meet lots of new friends,in a helthy way. When you are SEATED in a hot tub,
there is no classification.///end of PART Two///

You have to take all your clothes off BESIDE EVERYBODY.You leave your status outside,there is no VIP section,
everybody's the same.You have to leave your cell phone outside, so people are compelled to start TALKING
to others.
Most of the swimming pools are outdoors in Iceland.The ocean is very cold( maybe four degrees) and then the pools
are hot( 38/39°) ...It's such a great feeling.
It's A high quality water and it's a luxury to BE ALLOWED TO use it to bath in.
"This fjord is amazing. It's very quiet and calm. It HOSTS a lot of wild animals.Sometimes you see foxes running around, sometimes there are whales, dolphins. It's just a great place to recharge and meditate.Maybe we are a
little bit free-spirited in that way.///End of The text///



Réponse : Rack Your Brains and Help/84 de magie8, postée le 22-12-2020 à 19:41:48 (S | E)
HELLO VOICI MA CORRECTION FINI MERCI

It's a and the correction will be online on Sunday, December 27.


«It’s SUCH A great feeling. It’s like being BORN again, or putting on a different skin. We’re nearly naked. So we’re all EQUAL in the hot tub.» For Icelanders it’s THOUGHT being a part of the population’s wellbeing, to have an access to an outdoor swimming pool. «You can relax, enjoy the hot water. So, I think it brings out positive feelings : a feeling of wellbeing…»
Many Icelanders start their day WITH a swim before workING. «I usually do ten to twelve rounds every day, and after I go to the sauna and after THAT the hot TUB . And THEN I go to work. I’m a park ranger, so I need to be fit. At work, you usually talk a lot about something relatING TO work. And here, you can get to know people outside work: it’s kind of more personal TALKING . I think many Icelanders look upon the swimming pool as being an obligation: if you have a small town, you have the church, you have the museum, and you have the swimming pool. We have those images of great swimmers. As we are an island nation, swimming has been important for us in many ways. ///END of Part One/// We’re a fishing nation, so our lives HAVE depended ON being able to swim. In 1940, Iceland made mandatory swimming lessons. People had witnessed fishermen actually DROWNING by the shoreline, so of course, being obligated to learn how to swim made sense.»
Iceland sits on a hotbed of geothermal energy. Naturally heated water feeds hot tubs throughout the country. We look at the swimming pools as part of the public health policy in Iceland, both in terms of teaching our kids how to swim, also having all kinds of activities for senior citizens and regular people to go SWIMMING .
It’s really nice to get in the hot tubs after ocean swimming, especially when the ocean is quite cold, then we get in here and we warm up, and the hot tub is also where the party is going on, so everybody is happy and talkative, and here is a place to meet lots of new friends, in a healthy way. When you’re sitting in a hot tub, there’s no classification.///END of Part Two/// You have to take all your clothes off BESIDE everybody. You leave your status outside, there’s no VIP section, everybody’s the same. You have to leave your cell phone outside, so people are compelled to start to talk to others.
Most of the swimming pools are outdoors in Iceland. The ocean is very cold (maybe four degrees)and then the pools are hot (38/ 39°)… It’s such a great feeling. It’s high quality water and it’s a luxury to be able to use it to bath in. «This fjord is amazing. It’s very quiet and calm. It has a lot of wild animals. Sometimes you see foxes running around, sometimes there are whales, dolphins. It’s just a great place to recharge and meditate.
Maybe we are a little bit free-spirited UP in that way.»/// END of the Text ///



Réponse : Rack Your Brains and Help/84 de chocolatcitron, postée le 26-12-2020 à 16:50:19 (S | E)
Rack Your Brains and Help/84 Sunday, December 27.
Message de here4u posté le 11-12-2020 à 21:40:25 (S | E | F)
Hello my dear Here4u, thanks!

Hi everybody! :-)

FINISHED!

PLEASE, HELP MY POOR STUDENT: 13 mistakes were left.
Here is my work:
«It’s 1 such A great feeling. It’s like 2 FEELING REBORN or putting on a different skin. We’re nearly naked. So we’re all 3 EQUAL in the hot tub. » For Icelanders it’s 4 THOUGHT to be a part of the population’s wellbeing, 5 to GAIN ACCESS TO an outdoor swimming pool. «You can relax, enjoy the hot water. So, I think it brings out positive feelings: a feeling of wellbeing…»
Many Icelanders start their day 6 WITH a swim before 7 WORK. «I usually do ten to twelve rounds every day, and after I go to the sauna and after the hot pots. And after I go to work. I’m a park ranger, so I need to be fit. At work, you usually talk a lot about something related 8 TO work. And here, you can get to know people outside work: it’s kind of more personal talk. I think many Icelanders look upon the swimming pool as being an obligation: if you have a small town, you have the church, you have the museum, and you have the swimming pool. We have those images of great swimmers. As we are an island nation, swimming has been important for us in many ways. ///END of Part One///
We’re a fishing nation, so our lives depended 9 ON being able to swim. In 1940, Iceland made mandatory swimming lessons. People had witnessed fishermen actually 10 DROWNING by the shoreline, so of course, being obligated to learn how to swim made sense».
Iceland sits on a hotbed of geothermal energy. Naturally heated water feeds hot tubs throughout the country. We look at the swimming pools as part of the public health policy in Iceland, both in terms of teaching our kids how to swim, also having all kinds of activities for senior citizens and regular people to go to swim.
It’s really nice to get in the hot tubs after ocean swimming, especially when the ocean is quite cold, then we get in here and we warm up, and the hot tub is also where the party is going on, so everybody is happy and talkative, and here is a place to meet lots of new friends, in a healthy way. When you’re sitting in a hot tub, there’s no classification. ///END of Part Two///
You have to take all your clothes off besides everybody. You leave your status outside, there’s no VIP section, everybody’s the same. You have to leave your cell phone outside, so people are compelled to start 11 TALKING to 12 THE others.
Most of the swimming pools are outdoors in Iceland. The ocean is very cold (maybe four degrees) and then the pools are hot (38/ 39°) … It’s such a great feeling. It’s 13 HIGH-QUALITY water and it’s a luxury to be able to use it to bath in. «This fjord is amazing. It’s very quiet and calm. It has a lot of wild animals. Sometimes you see foxes running around, sometimes there are whales, dolphins. It’s just a great place to recharge and meditate.
Maybe we are a little bit free-spirited in that way». /// END of the Text ///

I give THE FORCE back to you!
See you soon!



Réponse : Rack Your Brains and Help/84 de magie8, postée le 26-12-2020 à 19:20:39 (S | E)
HELLO DEAR WORKERS. I WiII TRANSLATE THE FIRST PART



Réponse : Rack Your Brains and Help/84 de chocolatcitron, postée le 26-12-2020 à 19:41:15 (S | E)
Hello,
Thanks Magie, I'll take the third part !



Réponse : Rack Your Brains and Help/84 de here4u, postée le 27-12-2020 à 22:07:01 (S | E)
Hello, Dear Friends,

I hope that in spite of his mask and social distancing, Santa was able to fill your socks with goodies and bring you HOPE for the end of this (rotten ) Year and the coming one...





«It’s such a great(1)feeling. It’s like being reborn(2) again, or putting on a different skin. We’re nearly naked. So we’re all equal (3) in the hot tub.» For Icelanders it’s thought to be (4) a part of the population’s wellbeing, to have an access to an outdoor swimming pool. «You can relax, enjoy the hot water. So, I think it brings out positive feelings: a feeling of wellbeing…»
Many Icelanders start their day with (5) a swim before work. «I usually do ten to twelve rounds every day, and then (6) I go to the sauna and then (6) the hot pots. And then (6) I go to work. I’m a park ranger, so I need to be fit. At work, you usually talk a lot about something related to work (7). And here, you can get to know people outside work: it’s kind of more personal talk. I think many Icelanders look upon the swimming pool as being an obligation: if you have a small town, you have the church, you have the museum, and you have the swimming pool. We have those images of great swimmers. As we are an island nation, swimming has been important for us in many ways.///END of Part One/// We’re a fishing nation, so our lives depended on (8) being able to swim. In 1940, Iceland made swimming lessons mandatory (9). People had witnessed fishermen actually drowning (10) by the shoreline, so of course, being obligated to learn how to swim made sense.»
Iceland sits on a hotbed of geothermal energy. Naturally heated water feeds hot tubs throughout the country. We look at the swimming pools as part of the public health (11) policy in Iceland, both in terms of teaching our kids how (12) to swim, also having all kinds of activities for senior citizens and regular people to go to swim.
It’s really nice to get in the hot tubs after ocean swimming, especially when the ocean is quite cold, then we get in here and we warm up, and the hot tub is also where the party is going on, so everybody is happy and talkative, and here is a place to meet lots of new friends, in a healthy way (11). When you’re sitting in a hot tub, there’s no classification./// END OF PART TWO /// You have to take all your clothes off in front of (13) everybody. You leave your status outside, there’s no VIP section, everybody’s the same. You have to leave your cell phone outside, so people are compelled to start to talk to others.
Most of the swimming pools are outdoors in Iceland. The ocean is very cold (maybe four degrees) and then the pools are hot (38/ 39°)… It’s such a great feeling. It’s high quality water and it’s a luxury to be able to use it to bathe (14)in. «This fjord is amazing. It’s very quiet and calm. It has a lot of wild animals. Sometimes you see foxes running around, sometimes there are whales, dolphins. It’s just a great place to recharge and meditate.
Maybe we are a little bit free-spirited in that way.» ///END OF TEXT///


(1) It’s (a such great feeling=> It’s such a great feeling : dans les exclamatives, on utilise SUCH (+ déterminant ) devant un NOM [singulier] (qui peut être précédé d’un adjectif.) SO s’utilise devant un adjectif : it’s so great !
(2) being reborn: to be born: reborn= born again; a new birth… certains ont pensé que le «again *» était pléonastique, mais en fait, l’usage des hot tubs permet des renaissances successives … verbe irrégulier : to bear, I bore, borne.
(3) «egual» est espagnol …(mais quand même rencontré des milliers de fois dans les copies d’élèves … ) => to be equal to someone.
(4) it’s though being:! Deux fautes regroupées ici ! though : although : bien que ; THOUGHT : preterite de to think, I thought, thought : it’s thought to be a part (ici, à la forme passive suivi de l’infinitif.)
(5) start their day by a swim=> start their day with a swim.
(6) et après, …. après, et après … Encore une « faute favorite » de Learner …"after" est suivi d’un mot,(after lunch/ after going/...) Il n'est pas employé seul en anglais => then/ afterwards.
(7) To be related TO something or someone. Related - English-French Dictionary WordReference.com
Bien étudier les différentes significations de ce mot et ne pas oublier le sens de « parenté », membre de la famille (relation/ relatives)
(8) To depend ON
(9) Iceland (Iceland made mandatory swimming lessons...: la construction correcte est "Iceland made swimming lessons mandatory/ compulsory": rendre obligatoires …
(10) Ne pas confondre : to draw, I drew, drawn (verbe irrégulier) et drown : se noyer.
(11) Mon élève avait laissé une faute sur «health/ wealth»// «healthy/ wealthy»// , mais sans le faire exprès, je l’ai, corrigée sur votre exemplaire … Sorry!
(12) apprendre à nager/: "comment nager" : to teach HOW TO swim.
(13) Le sens de la phrase reprenait l’idée exprimée clairement au début … Les baigneurs sont nus, et se déshabillent …. devant tout le monde : to take all your clothes off in front of everybody ; beside: à côté de, près de : beside - English-French Dictionary WordReference.com // besides: besides - English-French Dictionary WordReference.com
(14) a bath: dans une baignoire// "bathe" dans la mer ou l’océan, une piscine …

Voilà ! Alors, j'avais mal compté, et ... j'ai oublié de laisser une faute ... Sorry!

Deux Volontaires sont déclarées ... Il m'en faut encore un/ une ... pour le Follow Up Work! (ce travail n'est pas urgent !)
Bravo pour votre très bon travail ... encore plus méritoire en cette période ! à tous !



Réponse : Rack Your Brains and Help/84 de maxwell, postée le 28-12-2020 à 20:23:46 (S | E)
FINISHED

Hello!
Therefore, I'll take Part II.
Part II:
We’re a fishing nation, so our lives depended on being able to swim. In 1940, Iceland made swimming lessons mandatory. People had witnessed fishermen actually drowning by the shoreline, so of course, being obligated to learn how to swim made sense.»
Iceland sits on a hotbed of geothermal energy. Naturally heated water feeds hot tubs throughout the country. We look at the swimming pools as part of the public health policy in Iceland, both in terms of teaching our kids how to swim, also having all kinds of activities for senior citizens and regular people to go to swim.
It’s really nice to get in the hot tubs after ocean swimming, especially when the ocean is quite cold, then we get in here and we warm up, and the hot tub is also where the party is going on, so everybody is happy and talkative, and here is a place to meet lots of new friends, in a healthy way. When you’re sitting in a hot tub, there’s no classification.

Nous sommes une nation de pêcheurs, donc nos vies ont dépendu de la faculté de nager. En 1940, l'Islande a rendu les cours de natation obligatoires. Les gens avaient assisté à la noyade de pêcheurs près du rivage, alors bien sûr, le fait d'être obligé d'apprendre à nager semblait logique."
L'Islande se trouve sur un foyer d'énergie géothermale. L'eau chauffée naturellement alimente des spas dans tout le pays. Nous considérons les piscines comme partie intégrante de la politique de santé publique en Islande, à la fois en termes d'apprentissage de la natation pour les enfants, mais aussi en fourniture de toutes sortes d'activités pour que les séniors et les habitués puissent aller nager.
C'est vraiment agréable d'aller dans les spas après avoir nagé dans l'océan, surtout quand l'océan est franchement froid, alors nous entrons ici et nous nous réchauffons, et le spa est aussi le lieu où se déroule la fête, alors tout le monde est content et bavarde, et c'est un endroit pour rencontrer plein de nouveaux amis de façon saine. Quand vous êtes assis dans un spa, il n'y a pas de classification.



Réponse : Rack Your Brains and Help/84 de magie8, postée le 28-12-2020 à 22:01:19 (S | E)
«It’s such a great(1)feeling. It’s like being reborn(2) again, or putting on a different skin. We’re nearly naked. So we’re all equal (3) in the hot tub.» For Icelanders it’s thought to be (4) a part of the population’s wellbeing, to have an access to an outdoor swimming pool. «You can relax, enjoy the hot water. So, I think it brings out positive feelings: a feeling of wellbeing…»
Many Icelanders start their day with (5) a swim before work. «I usually do ten to twelve rounds every day, and then (6) I go to the sauna and then (6) the hot pots. And then (6) I go to work. I’m a park ranger, so I need to be fit. At work, you usually talk a lot about something related to work (7). And here, you can get to know people outside work: it’s kind of more personal talk. I think many Icelanders look upon the swimming pool as being an obligation: if you have a small town, you have the church, you have the museum, and you have the swimming pool. We have those images of great swimmers. As we are an island nation, swimming has been important for us in many ways

"C'est une sensation tellement géniale.C'est comme naître plusieurs fois, ou changer de peau.Nous sommes presque nus.On est donc tous égaux dans le jacuzzi." Chez les Islandais on pense qu'avoir accès à une piscine extérieure fait partie du bien-être de la population. Vous pouvez vous détendre, profiter de l'eau chaude.Donc je pense que cela fait ressortir des sentiments positifs:une sensation de bien être ..." Beaucoup d'Islandais commencent leur journée par une baignade avant le travail." Je fais généralement dix à douze fois le tour de la piscine chaque jour , puis je vais au sauna et ensuite au spa . Et après je me rends au travail.Je suis garde-forestier, alors je dois
être en forme.Au travail on parle généralement de beaucoup de choses liées au travail.Et ici,vous pouvez faire connaissance avec des gens en dehors du travail:c'est un genre de conversation plus personnelle.Je pense que beaucoup d'Islandais considèrent la piscine comme une obligation.
Si vous habitez une petite ville vous l'église, vous avez le musée et vous avez la piscine.Nous avons ces images de grands nageurs.
Comme nous sommes une nation insulaire la natation a été importante pour nous à bien des égards. .



Réponse : Rack Your Brains and Help/84 de chocolatcitron, postée le 29-12-2020 à 13:26:17 (S | E)
Hello!

Here is the third part:

You have to take all your clothes off in front of (13) everybody. You leave your status outside, there’s no VIP section, everybody’s the same. You have to leave your cell phone outside, so people are compelled to start to talk to others.
Most of the swimming pools are outdoors in Iceland. The ocean is very cold (maybe four degrees) and then the pools are hot (38/ 39°)… It’s such a great feeling. It’s high quality water and it’s a luxury to be able to use it to bathe (14)in. «This fjord is amazing. It’s very quiet and calm. It has a lot of wild animals. Sometimes you see foxes running around, sometimes there are whales, dolphins. It’s just a great place to recharge and meditate.
Maybe we are a little bit free-spirited in that way.» ///END OF TEXT///


Vous devez enlever tous vos vêtements devant tout le monde. Vous laissez votre statut à l'extérieur, il n'y a pas de section VIP, tout le monde est logé à la même enseigne. Vous devez laisser votre téléphone portable à l'extérieur, de sorte que les gens sont obligés de commencer à parler aux autres.
La plupart des piscines sont à l'extérieur en Islande. L'océan est très froid (peut-être quatre degrés) et puis les piscines sont chaudes (38/39°)... C'est un sentiment génial. C'est de l'eau de bonne qualité et c'est un luxe de pouvoir l'utiliser pour se baigner. « Ce fjord est incroyable. C'est très tranquille et calme. Il y a de nombreux animaux sauvages. Parfois, vous voyez des renards courir, parfois il y a des baleines, des dauphins. C'est juste un endroit idéal pour se ressourcer et méditer.
Peut-être sommes-nous un petit peu libres d'esprit de cette façon." ///FIN DU TEXTE///.

Thanks Here4u for your work!
Stay safe, each of You!
See you soon.



Réponse : Rack Your Brains and Help/84 de maxwell, postée le 30-12-2020 à 18:45:07 (S | E)
Finished
Hello

Magie's part I:
«It’s such a great feeling. It’s like being reborn again, or putting on a different skin. We’re nearly naked. So we’re all equal in the hot tub.» For Icelanders it’s thought to be a part of the population’s wellbeing, to have an access to an outdoor swimming pool. «You can relax, enjoy the hot water. So, I think it brings out positive feelings: a feeling of wellbeing…»
Many Icelanders start their day with a swim before work. «I usually do ten to twelve rounds every day, and then I go to the sauna and then the hot pots. And then I go to work. I’m a park ranger, so I need to be fit. At work, you usually talk a lot about something related to work. And here, you can get to know people outside work: it’s kind of more personal talk. I think many Icelanders look upon the swimming pool as being an obligation: if you have a small town, you have the church, you have the museum, and you have the swimming pool. We have those images of great swimmers. As we are an island nation, swimming has been important for us in many ways

"C'est une sensation tellement géniale. C'est comme renaître, ou changer de peau. Nous sommes presque nus. On est donc tous égaux dans le jacuzzi." Chez les Islandais on pense qu'avoir accès à une piscine extérieure fait partie du bien-être de la population. Vous pouvez vous détendre, profiter de l'eau chaude. Donc je pense que cela fait ressortir des sentiments positifs : une sensation de bien-être..." Beaucoup d'Islandais commencent leur journée par une baignade avant le travail. "Je fais généralement dix à douze longueurs par jour, puis je vais au sauna et ensuite au spa. Et après je me rends au travail. Je suis garde-forestier, donc je dois être en forme. Au travail on parle généralement de beaucoup de choses liées au travail. Et ici, vous pouvez faire connaissance avec des gens en dehors du travail : c'est une sorte de conversation plus personnelle. Je pense que beaucoup d'Islandais considèrent la piscine comme une obligation. Si vous habitez une petite ville, vous avez l'église, vous avez le musée et vous avez la piscine. Nous avons ces images de grands nageurs. Comme nous sommes une nation insulaire, la natation a été importante pour nous à bien des égards.

Chocolatcitron's part III:
You have to take all your clothes off in front of everybody. You leave your status outside, there’s no VIP section, everybody’s the same. You have to leave your cell phone outside, so people are compelled to start to talk to others.
Most of the swimming pools are outdoors in Iceland. The ocean is very cold (maybe four degrees) and then the pools are hot (38/ 39°)… It’s such a great feeling. It’s high quality water and it’s a luxury to be able to use it to bathe in. «This fjord is amazing. It’s very quiet and calm. It has a lot of wild animals. Sometimes you see foxes running around, sometimes there are whales, dolphins. It’s just a great place to recharge and meditate.
Maybe we are a little bit free-spirited in that way.»


Vous devez enlever tous vos vêtements devant tout le monde. Vous laissez votre statut à l'extérieur, il n'y a pas de section VIP, tout le monde est logé à la même enseigne. Vous devez laisser votre téléphone portable à l'extérieur, de sorte que les gens sont obligés de commencer à parler aux autres.
La plupart des piscines sont à l'extérieur en Islande. L'océan est très froid (peut-être quatre degrés) et puis les piscines sont chaudes (38/39°)... C'est une sensation tellement agréable. C'est de l'eau de bonne qualité et c'est un luxe de pouvoir l'utiliser pour se baigner. « Ce fjord est incroyable. C'est très tranquille et calme. Il y a de nombreux animaux sauvages. Parfois, vous voyez des renards courir, parfois il y a des baleines, des dauphins. C'est juste un endroit idéal pour se ressourcer et méditer.
Peut-être sommes-nous un petit peu libres d'esprit de cette façon."

Il n'y avait quasiment rien à redire



Réponse : Rack Your Brains and Help/84 de here4u, postée le 30-12-2020 à 22:03:31 (S | E)
Hello dear Friends !

ARGHHHHH!!! As an "end-of-the-Rotten-Year Present", the Machine has swallowed my correction!
Second try! starting now!) (Hum... Looks as if there's a police bug, now... )

«It’s such a great feeling. It’s like being reborn again, or putting on a different skin. We’re nearly naked. So we’re all equal in the hot tub.» For Icelanders it’s thought to be a part of the population’s wellbeing, to have an access to an outdoor swimming pool. «You can relax, enjoy the hot water. So, I think it brings out positive feelings: a feeling of wellbeing…»
Many Icelanders start their day with a swim before work. «I usually do ten to twelve rounds every day, and then I go to the sauna and then the hot pots. And then I go to work. I’m a park ranger, so I need to be fit. At work, you usually talk a lot about something related to work. And here, you can get to know people outside work: it’s kind of more personal talk. I think many Icelanders look upon the swimming pool as being an obligation: if you have a small town, you have the church, you have the museum, and you have the swimming pool. We have those images of great swimmers. As we are an island nation, swimming has been important for us in many ways.


"C'est une sensation tellement géniale. C'est comme renaître, ou changer de peau. Nous sommes presque nus. On est donc tous égaux dans le jacuzzi."* Chez les Islandais on pense qu'avoir accès à une piscine extérieure fait partie du bien-être de la population. Vous pouvez vous détendre, profiter de l'eau chaude. Donc je pense que cela fait ressortir des sentiments positifs : une sensation de bien-être ... " Beaucoup d'Islandais commencent leur journée par une baignade avant le travail. "Je fais généralement dix à douze longueurs par jour, puis je vais au sauna et ensuite au spa**. Et après je me rends au travail. Je suis garde-forestier, donc je dois être en forme. Au travail on parle généralement de beaucoup de choses liées au travail. Et ici, vous pouvez faire connaissance avec des gens en dehors du travail : c'est une sorte de conversation plus personnelle. Je pense que beaucoup d'Islandais considèrent la piscine comme une obligation. Si vous habitez une petite ville, vous avez l'église, vous avez le musée et vous avez la piscine. Nous avons ces images (on s'imagine que nous sommes/ on nous voit comme ...de grands nageurs. Comme nous sommes une nation insulaire, la natation a été est importante pour nous à bien des égards.


* Pas exactement ... Un jacuzzi est pour 4 ou 5 personnes, 8 ou 10 au maximum ... Il s'agit ici de piscines chauffées naturellement pour un nombre de personnes plus important et où il est même possible de nager ...
** Au spa, il y a des massages ...
Bravo, Magie! Une très bonne traduction.

We’re a fishing nation, so our lives depended on being able to swim. In 1940, Iceland made swimming lessons mandatory. People had witnessed fishermen actually drowning by the shoreline, so of course, being obligated to learn how to swim made sense.»
Iceland sits on a hotbed of geothermal energy. Naturally heated water feeds hot tubs throughout the country. We look at the swimming pools as part of the public health policy in Iceland, both in terms of teaching our kids how to swim, also having all kinds of activities for senior citizens and regular people to go to swim.
It’s really nice to get in the hot tubs after ocean swimming, especially when the ocean is quite cold, then we get in here and we warm up, and the hot tub is also where the party is going on, so everybody is happy and talkative, and here is a place to meet lots of new friends, in a healthy way. When you’re sitting in a hot tub, there’s no classification.


Nous sommes une nation de pêcheurs, donc nos vies ont dépendu de la faculté de nager. En 1940, l'Islande a rendu les cours de natation obligatoires. Les gens avaient assisté à la noyade de pêcheurs près du rivage, alors bien sûr, le fait d'être obligé d'apprendre à nager semblait logique."
L'Islande se trouve sur un foyer d'énergie géothermale gisement géothermique. L'eau chauffée naturellement alimente des spas dans tout le pays. Nous considérons les piscines comme partie intégrante de la politique de santé publique en Islande, à la fois en termes d'apprentissage de la natation pour les enfants, mais aussi en fourniture de pour donner toutes sortes d'activités pour que les séniors et les habitués puissent aller nager.
C'est vraiment agréable d'aller dans les spas après avoir nagé dans l'océan, surtout quand l'océan est franchement froid, alors nous entrons ici dans l'eau et nous nous réchauffons, et le spa est aussi le lieu où se déroule la fête, alors tout le monde est content et bavarde, et c'est un endroit pour rencontrer plein de nouveaux amis de façon saine. Quand vous êtes assis dans un spa, il n'y a pas de classification.

Bravo, Maxwell ! Une très bonne correction.

You have to take all your clothes off in front of everybody. You leave your status outside, there’s no VIP section, everybody’s the same. You have to leave your cell phone outside, so people are compelled to start to talk to others.
Most of the swimming pools are outdoors in Iceland. The ocean is very cold (maybe four degrees) and then the pools are hot (38/ 39°)… It’s such a great feeling. It’s high quality water and it’s a luxury to be able to use it to bathe in. «This fjord is amazing. It’s very quiet and calm. It has a lot of wild animals. Sometimes you see foxes running around, sometimes there are whales, dolphins. It’s just a great place to recharge and meditate.
Maybe we are a little bit free-spirited in that way.»

Vous devez enlever tous vos vêtements devant tout le monde. Vous laissez votre statut à l'extérieur, il n'y a pas de section VIP, tout le monde est logé à la même enseigne . Vous devez laisser votre téléphone portable à l'extérieur, de sorte que les gens sont obligés de commencer à parler aux autres.
La plupart des piscines sont à l'extérieur en Islande. L'océan est très froid (peut-être quatre degrés) et puis les piscines sont chaudes (38/39°)... C'est une sensation tellement agréable. C'est de l'eau de bonne qualité et c'est un luxe de pouvoir l'utiliser pour se baigner. « Ce fjord est incroyable. C'est très tranquille et calme. Il y a de nombreux animaux sauvages. Parfois, vous voyez courir des renards, parfois il y a des baleines, des dauphins. C'est juste un endroit idéal pour se ressourcer et méditer.
Peut-être sommes-nous un petit peu libres d'esprit de cette façon."
Bravo! Très bon travail, Choco!

Un excellent travail de nos trois volontaires assidus. Bravo aussi, en plus à Max pour la relecture de l'ensemble !




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