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Rack Your Brains and Help/102

Cours gratuits > Forum > Exercices du forum || En bas

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Rack Your Brains and Help/102
Message de here4u posté le 12-09-2021 à 22:05:06 (S | E | F)
Hello dear Fellow-workers!

Mon élève a beaucoup travaillé sur ce nouveau texte et n'a laissé que 12 fautes. (Cependant, comme il le fait toujours, il a répété ses fautes plusieurs fois, vous le savez ... (sigh) ) Il a vraiment besoin de votre aide pour trouver ses erreurs ... et les corriger !
Cet exercice est un et sa correction sera en ligne le lundi 27 septembre 2021.

Please, Help my poor Student! He needs you... This text contains 12 mistakes. (to be corrected in CAPITAL LETTERS, please!)

Humans evolve with ten digits on their hands and that’s likely the reason we have ten digits in our number system. Counting on our fingers feels like such natural and obvious thing to do that you might assume everyone does it in the same way. But, if you’re in UK or Europe, there’s a good chance you start counting with your left thumb. While in US and the Canada they start with the index finger, and finish with the thumb. In parts of the Middle East like Iran, they start on the right hand, with the pinky. That system basically is so for every number, you add a new finger, what researchers call: a linear system. This linear way of fingers counting seems that it could be innate or universal. Researchers assumed that children basically need fingers counting as a tool to learn, to grasp the concept of number but also to learn counting. In Japan you start with the fingers extended, and curl them in as you count upwards. In other places, things diverge ever more. In Eastern Africa, they try to make symmetric representations as much as possible, which is very important to them culturally./// END OF PART ONE /// The big limitation with these methods is they quickly run down of fingers – but that’s not an issue everywhere. In India, instead of counting complete or entire fingers, you count the lines between the segments, which gives you four different numbers for each finger: so you’ll reach much further than with the Western system. These linear systems are called one-dimensional, but there are also two-dimensional systems: the left hand counts till five, and the right hand keeps track of how many sets of fives have been counted – so these fingers represent a different dimension, multiples of 5. It’s also possible to combine these methods together: using the Indian system in two-dimensions would enable you to keep track of 20 sets of 20 – or up to 400!
There’s a third category of fingers counting where things get really interesting – symbolic. In China, counting from one to five is the same that in the West. But after six, they keep counting on the same hand, and instead of using quantities to represent numbers, they use symbols. /// END OF PART TWO /// This system works perfectly well when you master it, but it takes time in order to learn it. The Ancient Romans used a symbolic system to count till the thousands. Three fingers on the left hands were used to count «units». The thumb and forefinger made different shapes to represent the «tens». Adding the right hand lets you to keep track of «hundreds» and thousands in the same way.
So what does all this mean for our relationship with numbers? Fingers counting clearly has a huge cultural dimension. Natural as it feels, it’s a behaviour we learn as children, rather than something we do instinctively. At some point in the past, our ancestors have started counting and started designing counting systems. Which role did fingers counting play in that process? It’s a challenging task but hopefully we get closer of an answer to it. /// END OF THE TEXT ///

May the FORCE be with you... Thanks for your help!


Réponse : Rack Your Brains and Help/102 de taiji43, postée le 17-09-2021 à 12:05:41 (S | E)
Hello Dear Here4U
Really interesting article, however is the text without mistakes?...Our here4u expert will tell us..

READY TO BE CORRECTED

Humans EVOLVED with ten digits on their hands and that’s likely the reason we have ten digits in our number system. Counting on our fingers feels like such A natural and obvious thing to do that you might assume everyone does it in the same way. But, if you’re in UK or Europe, there’s a good chance you start counting with your left thumb. While in THE US and CANADA ( pas d’article) they start with the index finger, and finish with the thumb. In parts of the Middle East like Iran, they start on the right hand, with the pinky. That system basically is so for every number, you add a new finger, what researchers call: a linear system. This linear way of FINGER- counting (nom de la méthode)seems that it could be innate or universal. Researchers assumed that children basically need FINGER- counting as a LEARNING TOOL , to grasp the concept of number but also to learn HOW TO COUNT In Japan you start with the fingers extended, and curl them in as you count upwards. In other places, things diverge EVEN more (encore plus) . In Eastern Africa, they try to make symmetric representations as QUICKLY as possible, which is very important to them culturally./// END OF PART ONE ///

The big limitation with these methods is (THAT° qu’elles) they quickly run down of fingers – but that’s not an issue everywhere. In India, instead of counting complete or entire fingers, you count the lines between the segments, which gives you four different numbers for each finger: so you’ll reach much further than with the Western system. These linear systems are called one-dimensional, but there are also two-dimensional systems: the left hand counts UP TO (till =jusqu’à mais ne se dit pas ici car till= as far as) five, and the right hand keeps track of how many sets of FIVE (série du nombre cinq) have been counted – so these fingers represent a different dimension, multiples of 5. It’s also possible to combine these methods together: using the Indian system in two-dimensions would enable you to keep track of 20 sets of 20 – or up to 400!
There’s a third category of FINGER- counting where things get really interesting – symbolic. In China, counting from one to five is the same AS in the West. But after six, they keep counting on the same hand, and instead of using quantities to represent numbers, they use symbols. /// END OF PART TWO ///

This system works perfectly well when you master it, but it takes time in order to learn it. The Ancient Romans used a symbolic system to count UP TO the thousands. Three fingers on the left hands were used to count «units». The thumb and forefinger made different shapes to represent the «tens». Adding the right hand lets you KEEP track of «hundreds» and thousands in the same way.
So what does all this mean for our relationship with numbers? FINGER- counting clearly has a huge cultural dimension. Natural as it feels, it’s a behaviour we learn as children, rather than something we do instinctively. our ancestors STARTED (passé) counting and started designing counting systems. Which role did FINGER- counting play in that process? It’s a challenging task but hopefully we get closer of an answer to it. /// END OF THE TEXT ///




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