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Oral/Mythes et héros

Cours gratuits > Forum > Forum anglais: Questions sur l'anglais || En bas

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Oral/Mythes et héros
Message de charlene29 posté le 02-03-2016 à 14:40:51 (S | E | F)
Bonjour,
je passe mon oral d'anglais pour le Bac dans un mois et je souhaiterais savoir si quelqu'un pourrait m'aider à corriger mon texte que je dois apprendre?
Merci d'avance

notion : mythes et héros
Let’s talk about myths and heroes, a myth can be a story, a legend which is not real but we need to believe it because it gives a message of hope, courage, fairness and gives models for people. And a hero can be a mythical figure who saves people, a somebody who has extraordinary skills like strength, someone who risks their lives and that people admire because who achieved courageous things. For example, it can involve of a patriotic or national hero like a sportsman, politician, a fictitious hero, an icon, a defender of common values and some others.
In class, we studied this notion through the topic the Apartheid in South Africa.
Did the heroes of the struggle against Apartheid succeed in changing the society or creating a multicultural nation?
To begin, we’re going to see the Apartheid in South Africa in order to understand the context.
Then, let’s study the heroes of the struggle against Apartheid, more precisely Nelson Mandela.
Finally, we will focus on the myth of the Rainbow Nation with the reverse apartheid.
So, we watched a video whose title is “the Apartheid in South Africa” and which deals with circumstances of the Apartheid. We learned that it began in 1948 and consisted in the segregation between Blacks and Whites in the entire country. Blacks were persecuted, in fact were relocated in townships and the government control Black people’s movements by giving them a passbook which specified their racial group. In 1958, Blacks were deprived of their citizenship and their right to vote. Moreover, Black students weren’t allowed to go to the same schools as Whites. Black people can be considered like heroes because in 1960, thousands of them went to Sharpeville’s police station without their passbook and the policemen opened fire and killed 69 Blacks included women and kids. They rebelled and they resisted against Whites and their government. The Apartheid isn’t a myth, it’s a real event.
We also headed a recording about Mandela’s life. So, we understood that luckily, Blacks weren’t alone in their fight. Nelson Mandela was an iconic character during the Apartheid. He was born in 1918, studied law and in 1944 he joined the ANC. Together, they fought for the freedom and for equal rights in the entire country. In 1948, the national party was elected and it instituted racial segregation. Meanwhile, Mandela and the ANC continued their non-violent protest and Mandela became the enemy of the government. He was arrested in 1962 and he spent 27 years in jail. Mandela was a hero thanks to his courage, ha has given hope to Black South African by opening the first law practice for them, by fighting for their rights. During his years in prison he became an international symbol. The government offered Mandela his freedom if he stopped his fight but he refused because he didn’t want to abandon his beliefs. It’s a model for Blacks because he risked his life for them by becoming the target of the government. In 1990, he was released by the whie president of SA, Frederick De Klerk and then he became the president of the ANC and he negotiated the end of Apartheid. On May 10th 1994, he was sworn in as president after have won the Nobel Peace Prize with De Klerk, which earned them great admiration of Black people.
In the same year, Mandela made us believe that South Africans were also a Rainbow Nation, united in their diversity. The rainbow nation can be a multicultural nation with joy, hope and where Black and White people of different religions live together at peace. But it’s a myth, because in reality there are inequalities: Blacks are poorer than Whites for example. We studied a newspaper article’s about White people in SA nowadays who is called “A reverse apartheid?”. The reverse apartheid is a discrimination against Whites whereas during apartheid it was against Blacks. In fact, Whites are jobless, companies favour Black candidates because they are afraid of being accused of racism. This is called “affirmative actions”.
To conclude, we can say that the heroes of the struggle against Apartheid succeed in changing the society like Nelson Mandela who is reached to win the peace even if him and the other didn’t make success in creating a multicultural nation.
From my point of view, the simple fact of fighting against Apartheid made by you a hero because it’s necessary to have courage and the mental to lead its fight to end.

-------------------
Modifié par lucile83 le 02-03-2016 17:30


Réponse: Oral/Mythes et héros de laure95, postée le 03-03-2016 à 10:23:45 (S | E)
Bonjour,
-and gives models for people: changer le verbe.
-And a hero can be a mythical figure: éviter "and" en début d ephrase.
- a somebody: pas s'article.
- someone who risks their lives: SOMEONE + singulier.
- and that people admire because who achieved (temps) courageous things.
- For example, it can involve of a patriotic or national hero like a sportsman, (article) politician,
- In class, we studied this notion through the topic (préposition)the Apartheid in South Africa.

- which deals with (article)circumstances of the Apartheid.
- the government control (temps) Black people’s movements
- their passbook (pluriel)
- and the policemen opened fire: mot à mot.
- it’s a real event: temps.

- in the entire country: répétition.
- Black South African:pluriel.
- The government offered Mandela his freedom if he stopped his fight: concordance des temps.
- On May 10th 1994, he was sworn in as (article) president after have won (pas la bonne forme du verbe)the Nobel Peace Prize
- at (pas la bonne préposition) peace.
- We studied a newspaper article’s ('s: ?)about White people in SA nowadays who (pas le bon relatif)is called “A reverse apartheid?”.

- To conclude, we can say that the heroes of the struggle against Apartheid succeed (temps) in changing the society like Nelson Mandela who is reached (pas la bonne forme du verbe)to win the peace even if him (pas le bon pronom) and the other (pluriel)didn’t make success in creating a multicultural nation.
From my point of view, the simple fact of fighting against Apartheid made by you a hero because it’s necessary to have courage and the mental (vocabulaire) to lead its fight to end.

Finis ta conclusion par une question ou fais un lien avec une autre notion.



Réponse: Oral/Mythes et héros de charlene29, postée le 16-03-2016 à 09:34:01 (S | E)
Bonjour laure95, merci pour votre aide. J'ai corrigé mon texte le mieux possible :


Let’s talk about myths and heroes, a myth can be a story, a legend which is not real but we need to believe it because it gives a message of hope, courage, fairness for people. A hero can be a mythical figure who saves people, somebody who has extraordinary skills like strength, someone who risk their lives and that people admire because who achieve courageous things. For example, it can involve of a patriotic or national hero like a sportsman, a politician, a fictitious hero, an icon, a defender of common values and some others.
In class, we studied this notion through the topic of the Apartheid in South Africa.
Did the heroes of the struggle against Apartheid succeed in changing the society or creating a multicultural nation?
To begin, we’re going to see the Apartheid in South Africa in order to understand the context.
Then, let’s study the heroes of the struggle against Apartheid, more precisely Nelson Mandela.
Finally, we will focus on the myth of the Rainbow Nation with the reverse apartheid.
So, we watched a video whose title is “the Apartheid in South Africa” and which deals with the circumstances of the Apartheid. We learned that it began in 1948 and consisted in the segregation between Blacks and Whites in the entire country. Blacks were persecuted, in fact were relocated in townships and the government controls Black people’s movements by giving them a passbook which specified their racial group. In 1958, Blacks were deprived of their citizenship and their right to vote. Moreover, Black students weren’t allowed to go to the same schools as Whites. Black people can be considered like heroes because in 1960, thousands of them went to Sharpeville’s police station without their passbooks, the policemen are opened fire and killed 69 Blacks included women and kids. They rebelled and they resisted against Whites and their government. The Apartheid isn’t a myth, it was a real event.
We also headed a recording about Mandela’s life. So, we understood that luckily, Blacks weren’t alone in their fight. Nelson Mandela was an iconic character during the Apartheid. He was born in 1918, studied law and in 1944 he joined the ANC. Together, they fought for the freedom and for equal rights in the entire country. In 1948, the national party was elected and it instituted racial segregation. Meanwhile, Mandela and the ANC continued their non-violent protest and Mandela became the enemy of the government. He was arrested in 1962 and he spent 27 years in jail. Mandela was a hero thanks to his courage, ha has given hope to Black South Africans by opening the first law practice for them, by fighting for their rights. During his years in prison he became an international symbol. The government offered Mandela his freedom if he stopped his fight but he refused because he didn’t want to abandon his beliefs. It’s a model for Blacks because he risked his life for them by becoming the target of the government. In 1990, he was released by the white president of SA, Frederick De Klerk and then he became the president of the ANC and he negotiated the end of Apartheid. On May 10th 1994, he was sworn in as President after have win the Nobel Peace Prize with De Klerk, which earned them great admiration of Black people.
In the same year, Mandela made us believe that South Africans were also a Rainbow Nation, united in their diversity. The rainbow nation can be a multicultural nation with joy, hope and where Black and White people of different religions live together in peace. But it’s a myth, because in reality there are inequalities: Blacks are poorer than Whites for example. We studied a newspaper article about White people in SA nowadays, the title is “A reverse apartheid”. The reverse apartheid is a discrimination against Whites whereas during apartheid it was against Blacks. In fact, Whites are jobless, companies favour Black candidates because they are afraid of being accused of racism. This is called “affirmative actions”.
To conclude, we can say that the heroes of the struggle against Apartheid have managed to change the society like Nelson Mandela who won the peace even if him and the others didn’t make success in creating a multicultural nation.
From my point of view, the simple fact of fighting against Apartheid made by you a hero because it’s necessary to have courage and the mental to lead its fight to end.
Does the racial segregation concern only South Africa?



Réponse: Oral/Mythes et héros de laure95, postée le 17-03-2016 à 11:57:39 (S | E)
Bonjour,
- to believe (préposition)it
- someone who risk (singulier)their lives (singulier)and that people admire because who achieve (singulier) courageous things.
- For example, it can involve of (enlever OF) a patriotic or national hero

- We learned (verbe irrégulier)
- Blacks were persecuted, in fact were (WERE pas nécessaire de répéter) relocated in townships and the government controls (passé)
- the policemen are opened fire: pas la bonne construction du verbe.

- The government offered (conditionnel passé)Mandela his freedom if he stopped his fight
- On May 10th 1994, he was sworn in as (article)President after have win (AFTER + VERBE +ING)the Nobel Peace Prize with De Klerk,

- even if him (utiliser le pronom sujet)and the others didn’t make success in creating a multicultural nation.
- the simple fact of fighting against Apartheid made by (enlever BY) you a hero
- the mental (mettre le nom) to lead its fight to end.




Réponse: Oral/Mythes et héros de charlene29, postée le 20-03-2016 à 17:07:16 (S | E)
Bonjour laure095 ; j'ai a nouveau corrigé mon texte :

Let’s talk about myths and heroes, a myth can be a story, a legend which is not real but we need to believe to it because it gives a message of hope, courage, fairness for people. A hero can be a mythical figure who saves people, somebody who has extraordinary skills like strength, someone who risks his life and that people admire because who achieves courageous things. For example, it can involve a patriotic or national hero like a sportsman, a politician, a fictitious hero, an icon, a defender of common values and some others.
In class, we studied this notion through the topic of the Apartheid in South Africa.
Did the heroes of the struggle against Apartheid succeed in changing the society or creating a multicultural nation?
To begin, we’re going to see the Apartheid in South Africa in order to understand the context.
Then, let’s study the heroes of the struggle against Apartheid, more precisely Nelson Mandela.
Finally, we will focus on the myth of the Rainbow Nation with the reverse apartheid.
So, we watched a video whose title is “the Apartheid in South Africa” and which deals with the circumstances of the Apartheid. We learnt that it began in 1948 and consisted in the segregation between Blacks and Whites in the entire country. Blacks were persecuted, in fact, relocated in townships and the government controls Black people’s movements by giving them a passbook which specified their racial group. In 1958, Blacks were deprived of their citizenship and their right to vote. Moreover, Black students weren’t allowed to go to the same schools as Whites. Black people can be considered like heroes because in 1960, thousands of them went to Sharpeville’s police station without their passbooks, policemen opened fire and killed 69 Blacks included women and kids. They rebelled and they resisted against Whites and their government. The Apartheid isn’t a myth, it was a real event.
We also headed a recording about Mandela’s life. So, we understood that luckily, Blacks weren’t alone in their fight. Nelson Mandela was an iconic character during the Apartheid. He was born in 1918, studied law and in 1944 he joined the ANC. Together, they fought for the freedom and for equal rights in the entire country. In 1948, the national party was elected and it instituted racial segregation. Meanwhile, Mandela and the ANC continued their non-violent protest and Mandela became the enemy of the government. He was arrested in 1962 and he spent 27 years in jail. Mandela was a hero thanks to his courage, ha has given hope to Black South Africans by opening the first law practice for them, by fighting for their rights. During his years in prison he became an international symbol. The government would have offered Mandela his freedom if he stopped his fight but he refused because he didn’t want to abandon his beliefs. It’s a model for Blacks because he risked his life for them by becoming the target of the government. In 1990, he was released by the white president of SA, Frederick De Klerk and then he became the president of the ANC and he negotiated the end of Apartheid. On May 10th 1994, he was sworn in as President after winning the Nobel Peace Prize with De Klerk, which earned them great admiration of Black people.
In the same year, Mandela made us believe that South Africans were also a Rainbow Nation, united in their diversity. The rainbow nation can be a multicultural nation with joy, hope and where Black and White people of different religions live together in peace. But it’s a myth, because in reality there are inequalities: Blacks are poorer than Whites for example. We studied a newspaper article about White people in SA nowadays, the title is “A reverse apartheid”. The reverse apartheid is a discrimination against Whites whereas during apartheid it was against Blacks. In fact, Whites are jobless, companies favour Black candidates because they are afraid of being accused of racism. This is called “affirmative actions”.
To conclude, we can say that the heroes of the struggle against Apartheid have managed to change the society like Nelson Mandela who won the peace even if he and the others didn’t make success in creating a multicultural nation.
From my point of view, the simple fact of fighting against Apartheid made you a hero because it’s necessary to have courage and the mindset to lead its fight to end.
Does the racial segregation concern only South Africa?



Réponse: Oral/Mythes et héros de laure95, postée le 22-03-2016 à 15:18:21 (S | E)
Bonjour,
-we need to believe to (IN)it
- because who achieves courageous things: mettre un pronom sujet à la plce de WHO.
- In class, we studied this notion through the topic of the Apartheid in South Africa.

- the government controls Black people’s movements by giving them a passbook: passé.

-From my point of view, the simple fact of fighting against Apartheid made you a hero: mettre le verbe au présent.
- the mindset to lead its (pas le bon possessif)fight to end.




Réponse: Oral/Mythes et héros de charlene29, postée le 24-03-2016 à 17:57:23 (S | E)
merci laure095, voici ma correction :

Let’s talk about myths and heroes, a myth can be a story, a legend which is not real but we need to believe to in because it gives a message of hope, courage, fairness for people. A hero can be a mythical figure who saves people, somebody who has extraordinary skills like strength, someone who risks his life and that people admire because they achieve courageous things. For example, it can involve a patriotic or national hero like a sportsman, a politician, a fictitious hero, an icon, a defender of common values and some others.
In class, we studied this notion through the topic of the Apartheid in South Africa.
Did the heroes of the struggle against Apartheid succeed in changing the society or creating a multicultural nation?
To begin, we’re going to see the Apartheid in South Africa in order to understand the context.
Then, let’s study the heroes of the struggle against Apartheid, more precisely Nelson Mandela.
Finally, we will focus on the myth of the Rainbow Nation with the reverse apartheid.
So, we watched a video whose title is “the Apartheid in South Africa” and which deals with the circumstances of the Apartheid. We learnt that it began in 1948 and consisted in the segregation between Blacks and Whites in the entire country. Blacks were persecuted, in fact, relocated in townships and the government controls Black people’s movements by giving them a passbook which specified their racial group. In 1958, Blacks were deprived of their citizenship and their right to vote. Moreover, Black students weren’t allowed to go to the same schools as Whites. Black people can be considered like heroes because in 1960, thousands of them went to Sharpeville’s police station without their passbooks, policemen opened fire and killed 69 Blacks included women and kids. They rebelled and they resisted against Whites and their government. The Apartheid isn’t a myth, it was a real event.
We also headed a recording about Mandela’s life. So, we understood that luckily, Blacks weren’t alone in their fight. Nelson Mandela was an iconic character during the Apartheid. He was born in 1918, studied law and in 1944 he joined the ANC. Together, they fought for the freedom and for equal rights in the entire country. In 1948, the national party was elected and it instituted racial segregation. Meanwhile, Mandela and the ANC continued their non-violent protest and Mandela became the enemy of the government. He was arrested in 1962 and he spent 27 years in jail. Mandela was a hero thanks to his courage, ha has given hope to Black South Africans by opening the first law practice for them, by fighting for their rights. During his years in prison he became an international symbol. The government would have offered Mandela his freedom if he stopped his fight but he refused because he didn’t want to abandon his beliefs. It’s a model for Blacks because he risked his life for them by becoming the target of the government. In 1990, he was released by the white president of SA, Frederick De Klerk and then he became the president of the ANC and he negotiated the end of Apartheid. On May 10th 1994, he was sworn in as President after winning the Nobel Peace Prize with De Klerk, which earned them great admiration of Black people.
In the same year, Mandela made us believe that South Africans were also a Rainbow Nation, united in their diversity. The rainbow nation can be a multicultural nation with joy, hope and where Black and White people of different religions live together in peace. But it’s a myth, because in reality there are inequalities: Blacks are poorer than Whites for example. We studied a newspaper article about White people in SA nowadays, the title is “A reverse apartheid”. The reverse apartheid is a discrimination against Whites whereas during apartheid it was against Blacks. In fact, Whites are jobless, companies favour Black candidates because they are afraid of being accused of racism. This is called “affirmative actions”.
To conclude, we can say that the heroes of the struggle against Apartheid have managed to change the society like Nelson Mandela who won the peace even if he and the others didn’t make success in creating a multicultural nation.
From my point of view, the simple fact of fighting against Apartheid make you a hero because it’s necessary to have courage and the mindset to lead this fight to end.
Does the racial segregation concern only South Africa?




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