Cliquez ici pour revenir à l'accueil... Créer un test / 1 leçon par semaine
Connectez-vous !

Cliquez ici pour vous connecter
Nouveau compte
4 millions de comptes créés

100% gratuit !
[Avantages]


Comme des milliers de personnes, recevez gratuitement chaque semaine une leçon d'anglais !



- Accueil
- Aide/Contact
- Accès rapides
- Imprimer
- Lire cet extrait
- Livre d'or
- Nouveautés
- Plan du site
- Presse
- Recommander
- Signaler un bug
- Traduire cet extrait
- Webmasters
- Lien sur votre site




> Publicités :




> Partenaires :
-Jeux gratuits
-Nos autres sites
   


Rack Your Brains and Help!/66

Cours gratuits > Forum > Exercices du forum || En bas

[POSTER UNE NOUVELLE REPONSE] [Suivre ce sujet]


Rack Your Brains and Help!/66
Message de here4u posté le 12-03-2020 à 18:12:15 (S | E | F)
Hello, dear Hardworkers,

Voici la nouvelle édition du travail de "My Poor Student", who's always trying hard...
Un peu technique, cette fois, le choix de sa « démonstration » … mais vous commencez à connaître cet élève … Tout l’intéresse et tout l’intrigue … et il a eu envie de vous en parler … C’est un texte court, cette fois … Plus facile ? Vous le lui direz !
Cet exercice est un et sa correction sera en ligne le vendredi 27 mars tard.

PLEASE, HELP MY STUDENT... He has left 20 mistakes in this text… (They should be corrected IN CAPITAL LETTERS, please! )

2020 is a leap year. That means there’s a day more in the calendar - 29 February. But why do we have leap years? And how do we decide when to have them? The answer is little more complicated than you may think. So here’s how it works: we measure a day as how long it takes the Earth to turn once on her own axe - that’s 24 hours. And we measure calendar year as how long it takes the Earth to orbit the Sun- 365 days. Except the time it presently takes for the Earth to circle the Sun is 365.24 days. So that’s roughly a quarter of a day longer, which adds up to a full day every four years. To keep everything in sync this full day is added to the forth year’s shorter month - February. /// END OF PART 1 /// And that’s what we call a leap year. But we don’t presently have a leap year every forth years. And here’s why. Remember how we rounded down that 0.24 to a quarter? Well that difference does possibly add up, pushing all the system out of sync again - by 3 days out of every 400 years to be precise. In order to redress this slight unbalance, we have a leap year now and then so as not not add that extra day. But how do we decide when to have a leap year and when to jump? The first rule is that the year to add an extra day must be divised by four. The second rule is that a leap year cannot fall on a year that’s divised by 100. If it does, no leap day is added to that calendar year. /// END OF PART 2 /// But to make things even more complicated, there’s an exception for this second rule. If a leap year can be divided by 400, the leap day is added after all. That’s how a leap day happened in the years 1600 and 2000 but not in 1700, 1800 or 1900. We have the Pope Gregory XIII to thank for create this century rule some 400 years ago. His changes marked the beginning of the Gregorian calendar, which is still in use through the world today. So, leap years exist to help us stay in sync with the real astronomical year. And if you want to get real nerdy, there’s also the more recent introduction of leap seconds... but maybe we’ll explain that another year./// END OF TEXT///

OPTIONAL: in 150 words, say why you would ( or wouldn’t) like to be born on a 29th of February...

May the FORCE be with You!


Réponse : Rack Your Brains and Help!/66 de magie8, postée le 14-03-2020 à 16:44:49 (S | E)
bonjour, ready to correct

2020 is a leap year. That means there’s AN EXTRA day in the calendar - 29 February. But why do we have leap years? And how do we decide when to have them? The answer is A little more complicated than you may think. So here’s how it works: we measure a day as how long it takes the Earth to ROTATE once on ITS own AXIS - that’s 24 hours. And we measure A calendar year as how long it takes the Earth to orbit the Sun- 365 days. Except the time it ACTUALLY takes for the Earth to circle the Sun is 365.24 days. So that’s roughly a quarter of a day longer, which adds up to a full day every four years. To keep everything in sync this full day is added to the FOURTH year’s shorTEST month - February. /// END OF PART 1 /// And that’s what we call a leap year. But we don’t ACTUALLY have a leap year every foUR years. And here’s why. Remember how we rounded UP that 0.24 to a quarter? Well that difference does EVENTUALLY add up, pushing all the system out of sync again - by 3 days out of every 400 years to be precise. In order to redress this slight IMBALANCE , we have a leap year now and then so () not () add that extra day. But how do we decide when to have a leap year and when to SKIP? The first rule is that the year to add an extra day must be divisIBLE by four. The second rule is that a leap year cannot fall on a year that’s divisIBLE by 100. If it does, no leap day is added to that calendar year. /// END OF PART 2 /// But to make things even more complicated, there’s an exception TO this second rule. If a leap year can be divided by 400, the leap day is added after all. That’s WHY a leap day happened in the years 1600 and 2000 but not in 1700, 1800 or 1900. We have () Pope Gregory XIII to thank for creatING this century rule some 400 years ago. His changes marked the beginning of the Gregorian calendar, which is still in use ACROSS the world today. So, leap years exist to help us stay in sync with the real astronomical year. And if you want to get real nerdy, there’s also the more recent introduction of leap seconds... but maybe we’ll explain that another year./// END OF TEXT///



Réponse : Rack Your Brains and Help!/66 de maxwell, postée le 15-03-2020 à 18:28:22 (S | E)
READY TO BE CORRECTED
Hello Here4U
You ask us if this one is easier than the other ones? Well, most of the mistakes I've found were note hard to find out but, boy!, the ones I've left are worth 4 stars! I don't know how many... We'll see Thanks a lot anyway!
Help My Student:

2020 is a leap year. That means there’s ONE MORE DAY in the calendar - 29 February. But why do we have leap years? And how do we decide when to have them? The answer is A little more complicated than you may think. So here’s how it works: we measure a day BY how long it takes FOR the Earth to turn once on ITS own AXIS - that’s 24 hours. And we measure A calendar year BY how long it takes FOR the Earth to orbit the Sun- 365 days. Except THAT the time it ACTUALLY takes for the Earth to circle the Sun is 365.24 days. So that’s roughly a quarter of a day longer, which adds up to a full day every four years. To keep everything in sync this full day is added to the YEAR'S FOURTH shorter month - February. 
/// END OF PART 1 /// 
And that’s what we call a leap year. But we don’t ACTUALLY have a leap year every FOUR years. And here’s why. Remember how we rounded that 0.24 UP to a quarter? Well that difference does add up ACTUALLY, pushing all the system out of sync again - by 3 days out of every 400 years to be precise. In order to redress this slight IMBALANCE, we have a leap year now and then so as not TO add that extra day. But how do we decide when to have a leap year and when to SKIP? The first rule is that the year to add an extra day must be DIVISIBLE by four. The second rule is that a leap year cannot fall on a year that’s DIVISIBLE by 100. If it does, no leap day is added to that calendar year. 
/// END OF PART 2 /// 
But to make things even more complicated, there’s an exception for this second rule. If a leap year can be divided by 400, the leap day is added after all. That’s how a leap day happened in the years 1600 and 2000 but not in 1700, 1800 or 1900. We have TO THANK []Pope Gregory XIII for CREATING this century rule some 400 years ago. His changes marked the beginning of the Gregorian calendar, which is still in use THROUGHOUT the world today. So, leap years exist to help us stay in sync with the real astronomical year. And if you want to get REALLY nerdy, there’s also the more recent introduction of leap seconds... but maybe we’ll explain that another year.
/// END OF TEXT///


OPTIONAL: in 150 words, say why you would ( or wouldn’t) like to be born on a 29th of February...
Of course neither of us chooses (*) the day of his birth. Parents can, but not to the day. As for me, selfishly enough, and probably like most people, I wouldn't have liked being born on a 29th of February: What about birthdays (with their long-awaited gifts)? You do get older every year but you only have a party every four years? That would be so unfair!  Not to mention all the administrative issues... Can you always be registered with such a date of birth? I very much doubt it.Now, on the other hand, so few people were born on such a day. That makes you someone really special! What's more, I would have been introduced to this scientific topic earlier in my life (by my parents) and maybe I would have dedicated my life to science? 
(142 Words)



Réponse : Rack Your Brains and Help!/66 de taiji43, postée le 16-03-2020 à 16:49:17 (S | E)
Dear student I have learned with you, but what a puzzle to understand the text !,because very scientific, and IHave paid attention to thevocabulary . ! your text was short however it was no jock !We will submit our corrections to our dear teacher HERE4U
SO FAR ,SO GOOD

READY TO BE CORRECTED
2020 is a leap year.
That means there’s a day more in the calendar - 29 February.
But why do we have leap years? And how do we decide ON HAVING them? The answer is little more complicated than you may think. So here’s how it works: we measure IN ad ay as how long FOR the earth to turn (OK pour tourner sur son axe = dico) or to ROTATE once on ITS own AXIS - that’s 24 hours.

And we measure A calendar year BY CALCULATING how long FOR the Earth takes to orbit the Sun- 365 days. Except THAT the time it ACTUALLY takes for the Earth to REVOLVE AROUND the Sun (enlever is et mettre )- 365.24 days.

So that’s roughly AN EXTRA DAY SHIFT (un quart de jour supplémentaire) which adds up to a full day every four years. To keep everything in sync this full day is added( to the forth year’s shorter month) – February. =( Est ajouté au mois le plus court de la quatrième année) =  double cas possessif :
FORTHYEAR'SHORTEST MONTH -february/// END OF PART 1 ///

And that’s what we call a leap year. But we don’t ACTUALLY have a leap year every FOUR years. And here’s why. Remember how we rounded that 0.24 UP (verbe séparable avec up) (up car 0,24 est rehaussé à 0, 25 to a quarter) ?

(Well that difference does add up ACTUALLY pushing all the system out of sync again )– by 3 days out of 400 to be precise. (bien que cette différence ajoutée à vrai dire, pousse le le système hors d'une synchronisation )=ALTOUGH THAT ADDED DIFFERENCE PUSHED ACTUALLY …....
In order to redress this slight IMBALANCE we have a leap year now and then so as no TO add that extra day.

But how do we decide ON HAVING a leap year and when DO WE SKIP IT? The first rule is that the year to WHICH IS ADDED an extra day must be DIVISIBLE by four. The second rule is that a leap year cannot fall on a year WHICH IS DIVISIBLE by 100. If it does, no leap day is added to that calendar year. /// END OF PART 2 ///

But to make things even more complicated, there’s an exception for this second rule. If a leap year can be divided by 400, the leap day is added after all. That’s how a leap day happened in the years 1600 and 2000 but not in 1700, 1800 or 1900. We have TO THANK GREGORY XIII for CREATING this century rule some A FEW 400 years ago.

HIS changes marked the beginning of the Gregorian calendar, which is still in use AROUND the world today. So, leap years exist to help us stay in sync with the real astronomical year. And if you want to get real nerdy( ringard ?),,, there’s also the MOST recent or( THE LATEST) introduction of leap seconds... but maybe we’ll explain that another year. /// END OF TEXT
/(I haven't counted

READY TO BE CORRECTED MY TEXT
Being born on 29 February it is great, ! you distinguish yourself from others ; and those who indulge in bad jokes ; you can rebut : « that Giachino rossini (Italian composer wellknown for his 39 operas ,was born on 29 February ( 1792-1868) as well as the American astronaut Jacques Lousma, as well as a wide ist of artists artists including Michèle Morgan »,

You will tbe told that you have your birthday every 4 years; it is up to you to celebrate it on february 28th or March 1st or for two days in a row,.

Being born on February 29 th presupposes CONTACTS : being ready to explain the system of the Earth revolution, which in fact takes 365.25 days to go around the Sun which requires a day of catching up every four years and at last, Let' us not forget that the Internet includes several sites dedicated to people born this date, including Facebook which shares ideas on this subject = 153




Réponse : Rack Your Brains and Help!/66 de joe39, postée le 17-03-2020 à 18:59:37 (S | E)
Hello dear here4u,
Leap year, fatal year,
This way,
Oldwives used to say,
And sometime there was a why,
But indeed, awful events,
Are so common nowadays,
without even being reported
That have happened in a "leap year".
So, I send you my work,
Ready to be examined,
Crossing my fingers (you never know).

20 mistakes
2020 is a leap year. That means there’s an INTERCALARY - 1 day in the calendar - 29 February. But why do we have leap years? And how do we decide when to have them? The answer is A LITTLE BIT - 2 more complicated than you may think. So here’s how it works: we measure how MANY HOURS - 3 it takes the Earth to ROTATE AROUND – 4 on ITS OWN AXIS -5 that’s 24 hours. And we measure calendar year as how long it takes the Earth to orbit the Sun- 365 days. BUT- 6 the time it ACTUALLY- 7 takes for the Earth to circle the Sun is 365.24 days. So that’s roughly a quarter of a day longer, which adds up to a full day every four years. To keep everything in sync, this full day is added to THE FOURTH -8 year’s SHORTEST MONTH- 9- February. /// END OF PART 1 /// And that’s what we call a leap year. But we don’t REALLY -10 have a leap year every FOUR-11 years. And here’s why. Remember how we rounded down that 0.24 to a quarter? Well that difference does GRADUALLY - 12 add up, pushing all the system out of sync again - by 3 days out of every 400 years to be precise. In order to redress this slight IMBALANCE - 13, we have a leap year now and then so as not (not) add that extra day. But how do we decide when to have a leap year and when to jump IT- 14? The first rule is that the year to add an extra day must be DIVIDED – 15 by four. The second rule is that a leap year cannot fall on a year that’s DIVIDED by 100. If it does, no leap day is added to that calendar year. /// END OF PART 2 /// But to make things even more complicated, there’s an exception for this second rule. If a leap year can be divided by 400, the leap day is added after all. That’s WHY- 16 a leap day happened in the years 1600 and 2000 but not in 1700, 1800 or 1900. We have TO THANK- 17 the Pope Gregory XIII for CREATING- 18 this century rule some 400 years ago. His changes marked the beginning of the Gregorian calendar, which is still in use THROUGHOUT-19 the world today. So, leap years exist to help us stay in sync with the real astronomical year. And if you want to get REALLY -20 nerdy, there’s also the MOST -21 recent introduction of leap seconds... but maybe we’ll explain that another year./// END OF TEXT///

OPTIONAL: in 150 words, say why you would ( or wouldn’t) like to be born on a 29th of February.

I wouldn't like to be born on a 29th February.
Not because of "not celebrated birthdays", which are normally "recovered" by feasting them postponed in the following normal years or better still, simply shifting the official birth registration to the day after, as often done.
The trouble could arise in case of superstitious people who could feel themselves somehow concerned by the proximity (as a colleague, as a neighbour etc.) of a person born on February 29th, who wouldn't be "covered" in the way described above, thanks to the fame of tough luck given to the leap years respectively to the February 29th by someone with a backward mentality. 109

Thanking you very much for the demanding exercise, I wish you a pleasant evening, recommending you to take care and don't go out.

So long
Joe39



Réponse : Rack Your Brains and Help!/66 de here4u, postée le 22-03-2020 à 14:59:29 (S | E)
Hello, Dear Friends!

I'll start posting my work on your tries gradually - starting tonight - I "work" while I can! - long before the deadline (March 27th). You may, of course, work on these "corrections" individually, but please, don't send "corrections of corrections" for fear I might not be able to resist the oncoming flux... Your questions, if any, should be answered after the 27th. If not, don't be frightened to ask then!

More than ever, MAY YOU HAVE THE FORCE!




Réponse : Rack Your Brains and Help!/66 de alpiem, postée le 23-03-2020 à 15:00:14 (S | E)
Rack Your Brains and Help!/66 HELLO DEAR COACHES AND FELLOW WORKERS

THIS WORK IS ready
2020 is a leap year. That means there's a day more in the calendar-29th of February.But
why do we have leap years? And how do we decide when to have them?
The answer is A little more complicated than you may think.So here is how it works:
we measure a day as how long it takes the earth to turn once on her own axe-that's
24 hours.
And we mesure a calendar year as how long it takes the Earth to orbit the sun-365
days.
ACTUALLY, the time it takes for the Earth to circle the sun is 365.24 days.So that's
roughly a quarter of a day longer, which adds up to a full day every four years.
To keep everything in sync, this full day is added to the fourth year's shorter
month-February.And that's what we call a leap year.

But we don't REALLY have a leap year every four years. And here's why. Remember how
we rounded down that 0.24 to a quarter?(0.25)
Well that difference does INEVITABLY add up, pushing all the system out of sync
again- by 3 days out of every 400 years to be precise.
In order to redress this slight unbalance,we have a leap year now and then SO AS
NOT TO add that extra day.But how do we decide when to have a leap year and when
to jump?
The first rule is that the year to add an extra day must be DIVISIBLE by four.
The second rule is that a leap year cannot fall on a year that is DIVISIBLE BY 100.
If it does, no leap day is added to the calender year.But to make things even more
complicated, there is an exception for this second rule. If a leap year can be
divided by 400, the leap year is added after all.That's WHY a leap day happened
in the years 1600 and 2000 but not in 1700,1800 or 1900.
We have the Pope Gregory 13 to thank FOR CREATING this century'S rule some 400
years ago.
His changes marked the begining of the Gregorian calendar, which is still in use
THROUGOUT the world today.
So,leap years exist to help us stay in sync with the real astronomical year.
And if you want to BECOME A REAL nerdy, there's also the more recent introduction
of leap seconds...but maybe we'll explain that another year.



Réponse : Rack Your Brains and Help!/66 de magie8, postée le 25-03-2020 à 16:11:28 (S | E)
Bonjour je vous espère tous en bonne santé et en sécurité .pour moi pour l'instant cela se passe bien , je ne suis pas la plus mal lotie.Je prépare la traduction de la 1ère partie du texte , j'espère pouvoir la copier et coller car dès que je suis connectée quelques minutes tout se bloque. Prenez soin de vous. courage , magie8 😘🤩



Réponse : Rack Your Brains and Help!/66 de chocolatcitron, postée le 26-03-2020 à 07:04:10 (S | E)
Rack Your Brains and Help!/66 le vendredi 27 mars tard.
Message de here4u posté le 12-03-2020 à 18:12:15 (S | E | F)
Hello my dear Here4u thanks! FINISHED!
Hi Everybody!

Pour ton follow up work, JE TRADUIRAI LA DEUXIÈME PARTIE !

MY STUDENT.has left 20 mistakes in this text…
Here is my work :
2020 is a leap year. That means there’s AN EXTRA day LONGER in the calendar - 29 February. But why do we have leap years? And how do we decide when to have them? The answer is A little more complicated than you may think. So here’s how it works: we measure a day as how long it takes FOR the Earth to turn once on ITS own AXIS.- that’s 24 hours. And we measure THE calendar year as how long it takes FOR the Earth to orbit the Sun- 365 days. Except THAT the time it ACTUALLY takes for the Earth to circle the Sun is 365.24 days. So that’s roughly a quarter of a day longer, which adds up to a full day every four years. To keep everything in sync this full day is added to the FOURTH year’s shorter month - February. /// END OF PART 1 ///And that’s what we call a leap year. But we don’t ACTUALLY have a leap year every FOUR years. And here’s why. Remember how we rounded that 0.24 UP .to a quarter? Well that difference does possibly add up, pushing all the system out of sync again - by 3 days out of every 400 years to be precise. In order to redress this slight IMBALANCE, we have a leap year now and then so as not TO add that extra day. But how do we decide when to have a leap year and when to jump? The first rule is that the year to add an extra day must be DIVISIBLE by four. The second rule is that a leap year cannot fall on a year that’s DIVISIBLE by 100. If it does, no leap day is added to that calendar year. /// END OF PART 2 /// But to make things even more complicated, there’s an exception for this second rule. If a leap year can be DIVIDED by 400, the leap day is added after all. That’s how a leap day happened in the years 1600 and 2000 but not in 1700, 1800 or 1900. We have TO THANK [] Pope Gregory XIII for CREATING this century rule some 400 years ago. His changes marked the beginning of the Gregorian calendar, which is still in use THROUGHOUT the world today. So, leap years exist to help us stay in sync with the real astronomical year. And if you want to get A real nerdy, there’s also the more recent introduction of leap seconds... but maybe we’ll explain that another year./// END OF TEXT///



OPTIONAL: in 150 words, say why you would ( or wouldn’t) like to be born on a 29th of February...
May the FORCE be with You!

Being born on February, 29th, why since I do not decide the day of my birth ! It all depends on the day of my parents ‘s choice for my conception, and my mother ‘s cycle. It doesn't matter whether it's a February, 28th, or March, 1st, after all. Unless my birthday is celebrated mostly in childhood, because I might have to wait for my presents and to party with my friends for four long years. My parents would probably have celebrated it the day after I was born, as if I had been born on March, 1st. I would have distinguished myself from the others, because there must not be many people in a commune born on such a day. I would be the sign of aquarius in all cases, except perhaps still that I would change decade, but I do not believe in astrology! 146 words.

Être née le 29 Février, pourquoi puisque je ne décide pas le jour de ma naissance ! Tout dépend du jour que mes parents ont choisi pour ma conception, et du cycle de ma mère. Peu importe que ce soit un 28 février ou un premier mars après tout, à moins que mon anniversaire ne soit célébré surtout pendant l’enfance, parce que je pourrais devoir attendre mes cadeaux et pour faire la fête avec mes amis pendant quatre longues années. Mes parents auraient probablement célébré mon anniversaire le lendemain de ma naissance, comme si j’étais née le 1er mars. Je me serais démarqué des autres, parce qu’il ne doit pas y avoir beaucoup de gens dans une commune nés un tel jour. Je serais du signe du poisson dans tous les cas, sauf peut-être encore que je changerais de décan, mais je ne crois pas en l’astrologie!


Have a very sweet time at home if possible, be careful, each of You!
See you soon.



Réponse : Rack Your Brains and Help!/66 de chocolatcitron, postée le 26-03-2020 à 07:14:04 (S | E)
Hello Alpiem, tu t'es trompé de poste… !
Réponse : Rack Your Brains and Help!/66 de alpiem, postée le 23-03-2020 à 09:46:33 (S | E)
Ex 176/no expression, this time(correction on the 10 avri).Translate into English:

See you soon.

------------------
Modifié par lucile83 le 26-03-2020 10:04
J'ai fait le nécessaire ....merci !




Réponse : Rack Your Brains and Help!/66 de here4u, postée le 26-03-2020 à 10:20:39 (S | E)
Hello!
Merci à toutes les deux ...
J'avais repéré et mis le travail dans le "bon dossier" pour mes corrections ... mais "oublié" de demander le transfert à Lucile - je l'avais déjà dérangée pour un autre fil plus "urgent" juste avant !





Réponse : Rack Your Brains and Help!/66 de lucile83, postée le 26-03-2020 à 10:47:18 (S | E)
Hello dear here4u,
Tu ne me déranges jamais ni les 'hardworkers'




Réponse : Rack Your Brains and Help!/66 de here4u, postée le 26-03-2020 à 11:07:04 (S | E)


Courage et discipline à tous !



Réponse : Rack Your Brains and Help!/66 de here4u, postée le 27-03-2020 à 22:48:59 (S | E)
Hello, Dear Friends,

En ces moments dramatiques, j'espère, avant tout que vous allez tous bien et que le confinement, que vous suivez tous scrupuleusement je pense, ne vous est pas trop pénible ... Courage à nous tous !

Alors (soupir!), cette année bissextile 2020, est bien difficile ... Ce texte était assez technique mais vous l'avez bien compris ... Je vous félicite de votre travail, y compris de vos expressions personnelles ... Vous avez bien aidé "My Poor Student"! et il vous en remercie !

2020 is a leap year. That means there's an extra day (1) in the calendar - 29 February. But why do we have leap years? And how do we decide when to have them? The answer is a little (2) more complicated than you may think. So here's how it works (3) we measure a day as how long it takes the Earth to spin (4) once on its(5) own axis(6) - that's 24 hours. And we measure calendar year as how long it takes the Earth to orbit the Sun- 365 days. Except the time it actually (7) takes for the Earth to circle the Sun is 365.24 days. So that's roughly a quarter of a day longer, which adds up to a full day every four years. To keep everything in sync this full day is added to the year's fourth shortest (8) month - February. And that's what we call a leap year. But we don't actually (7) have a leap year every four (9) years. And here's why. Remember how we rounded up (10) that 0.24 to a quarter? Well that difference does eventually (11) add up, pushing the whole (12) system out of sync again - by 3 days out of every 400 years to be precise. In order to redress this slight (13) imbalance, we have to a leap year now and then so as not to add that extra day. But how do we decide when to have a leap year and when to skip?(14) The first rule is that the year to add an extra day must be divisible (15) by four. The second rule is that a leap year cannot fall on a year that's divisible(15) by 100. If it does, no leap day is added to that calendar year. But to make things even more complicated, there's an exception to (16) this second rule. If a leap year can be divided by 400, the leap day is added after all. That's why(17) a leap day happened in the years 1600 and 2000 but not in 1700, 1800 or 1900. We have XXX Pope Gregory XIII (18)TTB to thank for creating (19) this century rule some 400 years ago. His changes marked the beginning of the Gregorian calendar, which is still in use across (20) the world today. So, leap years exist to help us stay in sync with the real astronomical year. And if you want to get really nerdy *, there's also the more recent introduction of leap seconds... but maybe we'll explain that another year.

(1) "an extra day"= un jour supplémentaire, en plus. Etonnée que beaucoup ne l'aient pas trouvé ? Mon « Student » avait laissé l'expression correcte un peu plus bas, exprès ! N'hésitez pas à « saisir toutes les perches » tendues.
(2) "...is a little more complicated" : revoir la différence entre «little»= trop petite quantité indénombrable = trop peu et «a little»= un peu de = quelques = petite quantité.
(3) "how it works"= le présent simple (d'habitude) doit être utilisé
(4) to turn // to spin= Lien internet

Turn= to direct, aim, or set toward. To spin= to (cause to) rotate rapidly; to twirl/ to whirl Pour bien tenir compte du mouvement réel des astres et planètes => spin.
(5) Aucune raison de personnifier la Terre, ici. => not "her" but "its"?
(6) Un axe = an axis=> 2 axes; an ax(e)= une hache.
(7) actually= en fait ; presently= actuellement.
(8) the year's fourth shortest month= le mois le plus court (superlatif) de la 4è année.
(9) every four years= tous les quatre ans.
(10) we rounded up= arrondir au supérieur.
(11) eventually= finally.
(12) the whole system : le système en entier Leçon N° 106353.
(13) balance=> imbalance= le contraire.
(14) to skip= sauter au sens de passer : www.quora.com/What-is-the-deference-between-jump...
(15) must be divisible: the verb is to divide=> the adjective= divisible.
(16) an exception TO the rule
(17) That's how= c'est comment?=> that's why= c'est pourquoi ?
(18) Pope Gregory XIII ? Lorsqu'un titre est suivi d'un nom (ou d'un prénom)=> pas d'article : Queen Elizabeth, mais The Queen= la Reine.
(19) To thank someone FOR + V + ing
(20) across the world today= Lien internet
le monde entier.html // Lien internet

Difference between through and across= Lien internet



Voilà ! J'attends, bien sûr, les volontaires pour faire la traduction dans le Follow Up Work. Il me semble que deux se sont déjà déclarés ... J'attends le 3è, sans urgence ... Vous avez le temps !
Encore BRAVO et . Essayez de passer un week-end convenable !




Réponse : Rack Your Brains and Help!/66 de maya92, postée le 28-03-2020 à 12:02:25 (S | E)
Hello,

2020 est une année bissextile c’est pourquoi il y a un jour supplémentaire sur le calendrier : le 29 février. Mais pourquoi avons-nous des années bissextiles ? et comment decide-t-on quand elles auront lieu ? La réponse est un peu plus compliquée que vous pourriez le penser. Alors voila comment ça marche : la durée du jour correspond au temps que met la terre pour tourner sur elle-même c’est-à-dire 24 heures. Nous mesurons une année calendaire sur le temps que met la terre à tourner autour du soleil, c’est-à-dire 365 jours. Sauf que en fait le temps exact que met la tere pour tourner autour du soleil est 365,24 jours. Ce qui correspond en gros à ¼ de jour supplémentaire ce qui signifie un jour entier tous les quatre ans. Pour que tout reste bien synchronisé cette journée entière est ajoutée au mois le plus court : Février. C’est ce qu’on appelle une année bissextile. Mais en fait nous n’avons pas une année bissextile tous les quatre ans. Voici pourquoi : Rappelez-vous comment nous avons arrondi ce 0,24 à ¼ et bien cette différence s’ajoute finalement rendant de nouveau tout le système mal synchronisé de 3 jours tous les 400 ans pour être plus précis. Pour redresser ce léger déséquilibre, il faut qu’il y ait une année bissextile de temps en temps pour ne pas avoir à ajouter ce jour supplémentaire. Mais comment decider quand avoir une année bissextile ou quand la sauter ? La première règle est que l’année à laquelle ajouter un jour doit être divisible par 4. La seconde règle est que l’année bissextile ne peut pas tomber après une année divisible par 100. Si celà arrive aucun jour n’est supprimé dans l’année calendaire. Mais pour rendre les choses encore plus compliquées, il y a une exception à cette seconde règle. Si une année bissextile est divisible par 400 le jour supplémentaire est finalement ajouté. C’est pourquoi il y a eu un jour en moins en 1600 et en 2000 mais pas en 1800 ou en 1900. Nous devons remercier le pape Grégoire XIII pour avoir instauré cette règle séculaire il y a environ 400 ans. Ce changement a marqué le début du calendrier grégorien qui est toujours utilisé dans le monde de nos jours. Alors les années bissextiles existent pour nous aider à rester en phase avec l’année astronomique réelle. Et si vous êtes vraiment un fou de science il y a eu récemment l’introduction de seconds sautées …
Mais peut-être expliquerons nous celà une prochaine année …

Voilà c'est très difficile de traduire un texte auquel je ne comprends pas grand chose, I did my best



Réponse : Rack Your Brains and Help!/66 de magie8, postée le 28-03-2020 à 12:59:11 (S | E)
Bonjour voici la traduction de la 1ère partie , Maya92 a fait un super travail, je ne sais pas faire mieux.

2020 est une année bissextile.Cela signifie qu'il y a une journée supplémentaire sur le calendrier-29 février.Mais pourquoi avons- nous des années bissextiles?Et comment décidons-nous quand les avoir?La réponse est un peu plus compliquée que vous ne le pensez.Voici donc comment cela fonctionne:nous mesurons une journée en fonction du temps qu'il faut à la terre pour tourner une fois sur son axe-c'est-à-dire 24 heures.Et nous mesurons une année civile en tenant compte du temps qu'il faut à la terre pour tourner autour du soleil-365 jours.Sauf que le temps réellement nécessaire à la Terre pour faire le tour du soleil est de 365,24 jours.C'est donc un quart de jour en plus,ce qui représente un jour entier tous les quatre ans.Pour que tout soit synchronisé,cette journée complète est ajoutée au mois le plus court de la quatrième année-février.

Bonne santé à tous protégez vous bien.



Réponse : Rack Your Brains and Help!/66 de magie8, postée le 28-03-2020 à 12:59:11 (S | E)
Bonjour voici la traduction de la 1ère partie , Maya92 a fait un super travail, je ne sais pas faire mieux.

2020 est une année bissextile.Cela signifie qu'il y a une journée supplémentaire sur le calendrier-29 février.Mais pourquoi avons- nous des années bissextiles?Et comment décidons-nous quand les avoir?La réponse est un peu plus compliquée que vous ne le pensez.Voici donc comment cela fonctionne:nous mesurons une journée en fonction du temps qu'il faut à la terre pour tourner une fois sur son axe-c'est-à-dire 24 heures.Et nous mesurons une année civile en tenant compte du temps qu'il faut à la terre pour tourner autour du soleil-365 jours.Sauf que le temps réellement nécessaire à la Terre pour faire le tour du soleil est de 365,24 jours.C'est donc un quart de jour en plus,ce qui représente un jour entier tous les quatre ans.Pour que tout soit synchronisé,cette journée complète est ajoutée au mois le plus court de la quatrième année-février.

Bonne santé à tous protégez vous bien.



Réponse : Rack Your Brains and Help!/66 de here4u, postée le 28-03-2020 à 13:37:52 (S | E)
Hello!

Ne t'inquiète pas Magie ! Tu sais bien que je corrige TOUS LES DOUBLONS qui donnent des solutions variées !



Réponse : Rack Your Brains and Help!/66 de here4u, postée le 28-03-2020 à 15:08:16 (S | E)
Hello!

Let's start correcting your translations... I may not have enough time to do the whole thing in one go... Be patient!

2020 is a leap year. That means there's an extra day in the calendar - 29 February. But why do we have leap years? And how do we decide when to have them? The answer is a little more complicated than you may think. So here's how it works we measure a day as how long it takes the Earth to spin once on its own axis - that's 24 hours. And we measure calendar year as how long it takes the Earth to orbit the Sun- 365 days. Except the time it actually takes for the Earth to circle the Sun is 365.24 days. So that's roughly a quarter of a day longer, which adds up to a full day every four years. To keep everything in sync this full day is added to the fourth year's shortest month - February.

- 2020 est une année bissextile c’est pourquoi il y a un jour supplémentaire sur le calendrier : le 29 février. Mais pourquoi avons-nous des années bissextiles ? Et comment décide-t-on quand elles auront lieu ? La réponse est un peu plus compliquée que vous pourriez le penser . Alors voila comment ça marche : la durée du jour correspond au temps que met la terre pour tourner sur elle-même c’est-à-dire 24 heures. Nous mesurons une année calendaire sur le temps que met la terre à tourner autour du soleil, c’est-à-dire 365 jours. Sauf qu' en fait le temps exact que met vraiment la terre pour tourner autour du soleil est 365,24 jours. Ce qui correspond en gros à ¼ de jour supplémentaire ce qui signifie un jour entier tous les quatre ans. Pour que tout reste bien synchronisé cette journée entière est ajoutée au mois le plus court de la quatrième année : Février.
C'est très bien, Maya! Bravo! et

- 2020 est une année bissextile. Cela signifie qu'il y a une journée supplémentaire sur le calendrier - 29 février. Mais pourquoi avons-nous des années bissextiles? Et comment décidons-nous quand les avoir? La réponse est un peu plus compliquée que vous ne le pensez. Voici donc comment cela fonctionne : nous mesurons une journée en fonction du temps qu'il faut à la terre pour tourner une fois sur son axe-c'est-à-dire 24 heures.Et nous mesurons une année civile en tenant compte du temps qu'il faut à la terre pour tourner autour du soleil-365 jours. Sauf que le temps réellement nécessaire à la Terre pour faire le tour du soleil est de 365,24 jours. C'est donc un quart de jour en plus, ce qui représente un jour entier tous les quatre ans. Pour que tout soit synchronisé, cette journée complète est ajoutée au mois le plus court de la quatrième année : février.
C'est très bien, Magie! Bravo! et


- 2020 est une année bissextile. Cela signifie qu'il y a un jour de plus dans le calendrier, le 29 Février. Mais pourquoi avons-nous des années bissextiles? Et comment décider quand les avoir? La réponse est un peu plus compliquée que vous ne le pensiez. Voici donc comment cela fonctionne : nous mesurons le temps que met la Terre pour tourner une fois sur son axe - c'est 24 heures. Et nous mesurons l'année civile au temps que la Terre met pour tourner autour du Soleil- 365 jours. Sauf que le temps réellement pris pour que la Terre fasse le tour du Soleil est de 365,24 jours. Donc, c'est à peu près un quart de jour de plus, ce qui s'ajoute à une journée complète tous les quatre ans. Pour tout synchroniser, cette journée complète est ajoutée au mois le plus court de la quatrième année - Février.
C'est très bien, Choco! Bravo! et


And that's what we call a leap year. But we don't actually have a leap year every four years. And here's why. Remember how we rounded up that 0.24 to a quarter? Well that difference does eventually add up, pushing the whole system out of sync again - by 3 days out of every 400 years to be precise. In order to redress this slight imbalance, we have to a leap year now and then so as not to add that extra day. But how do we decide when to have a leap year and when to skip? The first rule is that the year to add an extra day must be divisible by four. The second rule is that a leap year cannot fall on a year that's divisible by 100. If it does, no leap day is added to that calendar year.

- C’est ce qu’on appelle une année bissextile. Mais en fait nous n’avons pas une année bissextile tous les quatre ans. Voici pourquoi : Rappelez-vous comment nous avons arrondi ce 0,24 à ¼ au quart supérieur, et bien cette différence s’ajoute finalement rendant de nouveau tout le système mal synchronisé de 3 jours tous les 400 ans pour être plus précis. Pour redresser ce léger déséquilibre, il faut qu’il y ait une année bissextile de temps en temps pour ne pas avoir à ajouter ce jour supplémentaire. Mais comment décider quand avoir une année bissextile ou quand la faire sauter la journée ? La première règle est que l’année à laquelle ajouter un jour doit être divisible par 4. La seconde règle est que l’année bissextile ne peut pas tomber après sur une année divisible par 100. Si cela arrive, aucun jour n’est supprimé dans ajouté à l’année calendaire.
C'est très bien, Maya! Bravo! et

- Et c'est ce que nous appelons une année bissextile. Mais en fait nous n'avons pas vraiment une année bissextile tous les quatre ans. Et voici pourquoi. Rappelez-vous comment nous avons arrondi ce 0,24 à au quart supérieur (= 0.25)? Eh bien cette différence ne peut exister,= se cumule finalement, les fractions s'additionnent, repoussant tout le système à nouveau hors de synchronisation- à cause de 3 jours tous les 400 ans pour être précis. Afin de remédier à ce léger déséquilibre, nous avons une année bissextile de temps en temps pour ne pas ajouter ce jour supplémentaire. Mais comment décider quand avoir une année bissextile et quand la faire sauter ? La première règle pour ajouter un jour supplémentaire est que l'année doit être divisible par quatre. La deuxième règle est qu'une année bissextile ne peut pas tomber sur une année qui est divisible par 100. Si c'est le cas, aucun jour bissextile n'est ajouté à cette année civile.
C'est très bien, Choco! Bravo! et


But to make things even more complicated, there's an exception to this second rule. If a leap year can be divided by 400, the leap day is added after all. That's why a leap day happened in the years 1600 and 2000 but not in 1700, 1800 or 1900. We have Pope Gregory XIII to thank for creating this century rule some 400 years ago. His changes marked the beginning of the Gregorian calendar, which is still in use across the world today. So, leap years exist to help us stay in sync with the real astronomical year. And if you want to get really nerdy, there's also the more recent introduction of leap seconds... but maybe we'll explain that another year.

- Mais pour rendre les choses encore plus compliquées, il y a une exception à cette seconde règle. Si une année bissextile est divisible par 400, le jour supplémentaire est finalement ajouté. C’est pourquoi il y a eu un jour en moins en plus en 1600 et en 2000 mais pas en 1800 ou en 1900. Nous devons remercier le pape Grégoire XIII pour avoir instauré cette règle séculaire il y a environ 400 ans. Ce changement a marqué le début du calendrier grégorien qui est toujours utilisé dans le monde de nos jours. Alors les années bissextiles existent pour nous aider à rester en phase avec l’année astronomique réelle. Et si vous êtes vraiment un fou de science il y a eu récemment l’introduction de seconds sautées bissextiles
Mais peut-être expliquerons nous cela une prochaine (autre) année …

C'est très bien, Maya! Bravo! et

- Mais pour compliquer les choses, il y a une exception à cette deuxième règle. Si une année bissextile peut être divisée par 400, on ajoute un jour après tout. C'est ainsi qu'on a ajouté un jour bissextile dans les années 1600 et 2000, mais pas en 1700, 1800 ou 1900. Nous devons remercier le Pape Grégoire XIII d'avoir créé cette loi du siècle il y a environ 400 ans. Ces changements ont marqué le début du calendrier grégorien, qui est encore en usage dans le monde entier aujourd'hui. Il existe donc des années bissextiles pour nous aider à rester en phase avec la véritable année astronomique. Et si vous voulez rester vraiment ringard, il y a aussi l'introduction plus récente de secondes bissextiles ... mais peut-être nous allons expliquer cela cette une autre année.
C'est très bien, Choco! Bravo! et Merci du renfort !

à nos trois traductrices ! D'autres peuvent s'essayer à l'exercice en complément jusqu'à la fin du week-end ! !





Réponse : Rack Your Brains and Help!/66 de chocolatcitron, postée le 28-03-2020 à 15:15:12 (S | E)
Hello!

Finished!

Here is my translation for the second part of the text: (Here4u, you had gorgotten to mark the parts… )

And that's what we call a leap year. But we don't actually (7) have a leap year every four (9) years. And here's why. Remember how we rounded up (10) that 0.24 to a quarter? Well that difference does eventually (11) add up, pushing the whole (12) system out of sync again - by 3 days out of every 400 years to be precise. In order to redress this slight (13) imbalance, we have to a leap year now and then so as not to add that extra day. But how do we decide when to have a leap year and when to skip?(14) The first rule is that the year to add an extra day must be divisible (15) by four. The second rule is that a leap year cannot fall on a year that's divisible(15) by 100. If it does, no leap day is added to that calendar year.

Et c'est ce que nous appelons une année bissextile. Mais nous n'avons pas vraiment une année bissextile tous les quatre ans. Et voici pourquoi. Rappelez-vous comment nous avons arrondi ce 0,24 à un quart (= 0.25)? Eh bien cette différence ne peut exister, les fractions s'additionnent, repoussant tout le système hors de synchronisation- à cause de 3 jours tous les 400 ans pour être précis. Afin de remédier à ce léger déséquilibre, nous avons une année bissextile de temps en temps pour ne pas ajouter ce jour supplémentaire. Mais comment décider quand avoir une année bissextile et quand la faire sauter ? La première règle pour ajouter un jour supplémentaire est que l'année doit être divisible par quatre. La deuxième règle est qu'une année bissextile ne peut pas tomber sur une année qui est divisible par 100. Si c'est le cas, aucun jour bissextile n'est ajouté à cette année civile. END OF PART 2 ///


My translation of the first part, just for the fun!

2020 is a leap year. That means there's an extra day (1) in the calendar - 29 February. But why do we have leap years? And how do we decide when to have them? The answer is a little (2) more complicated than you may think. So here's how it works (3) we measure a day as how long it takes the Earth to spin (4) once on its(5) own axis(6) - that's 24 hours. And we measure calendar year as how long it takes the Earth to orbit the Sun- 365 days. Except the time it actually (7) takes for the Earth to circle the Sun is 365.24 days. So that's roughly a quarter of a day longer, which adds up to a full day every four years. To keep everything in sync this full day is added to the year's fourth shortest (8) month - February.

2020 est une année bissextile. Cela signifie qu'il y a un jour de plus dans le calendrier, le 29 Février. Mais pourquoi avons-nous des années bissextiles? Et comment décider quand les avoir? La réponse est un peu plus compliquée que vous ne le pensiez. Voici donc comment cela fonctionne : nous mesurons le temps que met la Terre pour tourner une fois sur son axe - c'est 24 heures. Et nous mesurons l'année civile au temps que la Terre met pour tourner autour du Soleil- 365 jours. Sauf que le temps réellement pris pour que la Terre fasse le tour du Soleil est de 365,24 jours. Donc, c'est à peu près un quart de jour de plus, ce qui s'ajoute à une journée complète tous les quatre ans. Pour tout synchroniser, cette journée complète est ajoutée au mois le plus court de la quatrième année - Février. FIN DE LA PARTIE 1 ///


And here is my translation for the third part, just for the fun!

But to make things even more complicated, there's an exception to (16) this second rule. If a leap year can be divided by 400, the leap day is added after all. That's why(17) a leap day happened in the years 1600 and 2000 but not in 1700, 1800 or 1900. We have XXX Pope Gregory XIII (18)TTB to thank for creating (19) this century rule some 400 years ago. His changes marked the beginning of the Gregorian calendar, which is still in use across (20) the world today. So, leap years exist to help us stay in sync with the real astronomical year. And if you want to get really nerdy *, there's also the more recent introduction of leap seconds... but maybe we'll explain that another year.

Mais pour compliquer les choses, il y a une exception à cette deuxième règle. Si une année bissextile peut être divisée par 400, on ajoute un jour après tout. C'est ainsi qu'on a ajouté un jour bissextile dans les années 1600 et 2000, mais pas en 1700, 1800 ou 1900. Nous devons remercier le Pape Grégoire XIII d'avoir créé cette loi du siècle il y a environ 400 ans. Ces changements ont marqué le début du calendrier grégorien, qui est encore en usage dans le monde entier aujourd'hui. Il existe donc des années bissextiles pour nous aider à rester en phase avec la véritable année astronomique. Et si vous voulez rester vraiment ringard, il y a aussi l'introduction plus récente de secondes bissextiles ... mais peut-être nous allons expliquer cette autre année./// END OF TEXT///


Merci Here4u, un texte chronophage certes, j'adore car sujet scientifique et très intéressant !❤️

Bon confinement à tous, prenez soin de vous : courage.
Have a very sweet and a cocooning Week at home if possible, be careful if you have to go out for working.
See you soon!




[POSTER UNE NOUVELLE REPONSE] [Suivre ce sujet]


Cours gratuits > Forum > Exercices du forum


Partager : Facebook / Twitter / ... 


> INDISPENSABLES : TESTEZ VOTRE NIVEAU | GUIDE DE TRAVAIL | NOS MEILLEURES FICHES | Les fiches les plus populaires | Une leçon par email par semaine | Aide/Contact

> COURS ET TESTS : -ing | AS / LIKE | Abréviations | Accord/Désaccord | Activités | Adjectifs | Adverbes | Alphabet | Animaux | Argent | Argot | Articles | Audio | Auxiliaires | Be | Betty | Chanson | Communication | Comparatifs/Superlatifs | Composés | Conditionnel | Confusions | Conjonctions | Connecteurs | Contes | Contractions | Contraires | Corps | Couleurs | Courrier | Cours | Dates | Dialogues | Dictées | Décrire | Ecole | En attente | Exclamations | Faire faire | Famille | Faux amis | Films | For ou since? | Formation | Futur | Fêtes | Genre | Get | Goûts | Grammaire | Guide | Géographie | Habitudes | Harry Potter | Have | Heure | Homonymes | Impersonnel | Infinitif | Internet | Inversion | Jeux | Journaux | Lettre manquante | Littérature | Magasin | Maison | Majuscules | Make/do? | Maladies | Mars | Matilda | Modaux | Mots | Mouvement | Musique | Mélanges | Méthodologie | Métiers | Météo | Nature | Neige | Nombres | Noms | Nourriture | Négation | Opinion | Ordres | Participes | Particules | Passif | Passé | Pays | Pluriel | Plus-que-parfait | Politesse | Ponctuation | Possession | Poèmes | Present perfect | Pronoms | Prononciation | Proverbes et structures idiomatiques | Prépositions | Présent | Présenter | Quantité | Question | Question Tags | Relatives | Royaume-Uni | Say, tell ou speak? | Sports | Style direct | Subjonctif | Subordonnées | Suggérer quelque chose | Synonymes | Temps | Tests de niveau | There is/There are | Thierry | This/That? | Tous les tests | Tout | Traductions | Travail | Téléphone | USA | Verbes irréguliers | Vidéo | Villes | Voitures | Voyages | Vêtements


> NOS AUTRES SITES GRATUITS : Cours mathématiques | Cours d'espagnol | Cours d'allemand | Cours de français | Cours de néerlandais | Outils utiles | Bac d'anglais | Learn French | Learn English | Créez des exercices

> INFORMATIONS : Copyright - En savoir plus, Aide, Contactez-nous [Conditions d'utilisation] [Conseils de sécurité] Reproductions et traductions interdites sur tout support (voir conditions) | Contenu des sites déposé chaque semaine chez un huissier de justice | Mentions légales / Vie privée / Cookies.
| Cours, leçons et exercices d'anglais 100% gratuits, hors abonnement internet auprès d'un fournisseur d'accès.