Cliquez ici pour revenir à l'accueil... Créer un test / 1 leçon par semaine
Connectez-vous !

Cliquez ici pour vous connecter
Nouveau compte
Des millions de comptes créés.

100% gratuit !
[Avantages]


Comme des milliers de personnes, recevez gratuitement chaque semaine une leçon d'anglais !



- Accueil
- Aide/Contact
- Accès rapides
- Imprimer
- Lire cet extrait
- Livre d'or
- Nouveautés
- Plan du site
- Presse
- Recommander
- Signaler un bug
- Traduire cet extrait
- Webmasters
- Lien sur votre site

> Nos sites :
-Jeux gratuits
-Nos autres sites
   


Rack Your Brains and Help!/ 69

Cours gratuits > Forum > Exercices du forum || En bas

[POSTER UNE NOUVELLE REPONSE] [Suivre ce sujet]


Rack Your Brains and Help!/ 69
Message de here4u posté le 28-04-2020 à 22:32:41 (S | E | F)
Hello, Dear Friends,

Voici votre nouvel exercice Rack Your Brains!

PLEASE, HELP MY STUDENT... He has left 22 mistakes in this text… - some are recurring! (They should be corrected IN CAPITAL LETTERS, please!)

Cet exercice est un et la correction sera en ligne le mardi 12 mai, tard.Ce texte va vous faire échapper pour retrouver les oiseaux ...

Why I spend my weekends ringing birds:
There is nothing quite like held wild birds. Their beauty, colours and behaviour never fail to astonish: the blue tit, so common in UK, turns out to be the most aggressive, pecky little bird imaginable; the goldcrest - the weight of a 20p coin - so tiny; the sparrowhawk, a quite rarity to trap, with its murderous look and heels.
The chance of getting this closed wildlife was one of the factors that attracted me to the surprising and challenging world of bird ringing. Long before dawn this winter morning, small groups of people all around Britain will wake up to spend several hours in the cold, in marshes, on beaches and sea cliffs. Their goal? To trap birds of so many species as possible in high nets, to measure them, age them, place a lightweight ring with a unique serial number at their right leg and release them, as part of a huge citizen science project which lasted more than a century now./// END of PART ONE ///
Joining this project as a trainer, which I did a little more than a year ago, was a startling and rather humbling experience.
It remains so. I'm a birder (not a twitcher, please) for many years. I can identify many dozen of different species
on sight and on their song, even if there are always plenty of people in the bird hides who know more than me. 12
What was a surprise for me was that hundreds of thousands of birds actually migrate to Britain in the winter. Our ringing group arrives at the bird reserve two hours before sunrise, to put up the 10ft high mist nets. Some reserves have fixed nets that can be unwrapped very easily. Ours are erected afresh each time because we move them depending of the season - no point putting a lot of nets up in the reed beds when the reed warblers are away until late April in sub-Saharan Africa. It would be wrong, however, to explain the motivation of bird ringing as purely a dispassionate collection of datas./// END of PART TWO/// As my trainer explains, it's also a matter of curiosity. « Migration fascinates me, especially during the summer when we're ringing reed warblers from Africa. »
The training to become ringer is rigorous, under the close supervision of an experienced ringer, and lasts around two years. Mistakes are easy to do - how many birds have I released too early through not holding them enough firmly; or mis-identified, or got their age and sex wrong, or cack-handedly put the ring on wrong. Bird extraction from the mist nets is a skill I have found very hard to learn. The vast datas sets collected on common birds such as the blue tit can be used to understand what's happening to scarcer species. "Also, at times like these when global warming and human interference on the natural world is so great, ringing provides data and evidences to support conservation initiatives that have the potential to benefit birds on threat."///END of TEXT///.

May THE FORCE be with you...



Réponse : Rack Your Brains and Help!/ 69 de magie8, postée le 29-04-2020 à 13:05:25 (S | E)
bonjour,
ready to correct

Why I spend my weekends ringing birds:
There is nothing quite like HOLDING wild birds. Their beauty, colours and behaviour never fail to astonish: the blue tit, so common in THE UK, turns out to be the most aggressive, pecky little bird imaginable; the goldcrest - the weight of a 20p coin - so tiny; the sparrowhawk, a quite rarity to trap, with its murderous look and heels.
The chance of getting this CLOSE TO wildlife was one of the factors that attracted me to the surprising and challenging world of bird ringing. Long before dawn this winter morning, small groups of people all around Britain will wake up to spend several hours in the cold, in marshes, on beaches and sea cliffs. Their goal? To trap birds of AS many species as possible in high nets, to measure them, age them, place a lightweight ring with a unique serial number ON their right leg and release them, as part of a huge citizen science project which HAS lasted more than a century now./// END of PART ONE ///
Joining this project as a TRAINEE , which I did a little more than a year ago, was a startling and rather humbling experience.
It remains so. I HAVE BEEN a birder (not a twitcher, please) for many years. I can identify many dozen of different species
BY sight and BY their song, even if there are always plenty of people in the bird hides who know more than me. 12
What was a surprise TO me was that hundreds of thousands of birds actually migrate to Britain in the winter. Our ringing group arrives at the bird reserve two hours before sunrise, to put up the 10ft high mist nets. Some reserves have fixed nets that can be UNROLLED or UNFURLED very easily. Ours are erected afresh each time because we move them depending ON the season - no point putting a lot of nets up in the reed beds when the reed warblers are away until late April in sub-Saharan Africa. It would be wrong, however, to explain the motivation of bird ringing as purely a dispassionate collection of DATA ./// END of PART TWO/// As my trainer explains, it's also a matter of curiosity. « Migration fascinates me, especially during the summer when we're ringing reed warblers from Africa. »
The training to become A ringer is rigorous, under the close supervision of an experienced ringer, and lasts around two years. Mistakes are easy to MAKE - how many birds have I released too early through not holding them firmly ENOUGH; or mis-identified, or got their age and sex wrong, or cack-handedly put the ring on wrong. Bird extraction from the mist nets is a skill I have found very hard to learn. The vast DATA sets collected on common birds such as the blue tit can be used to understand what's happening to scarcer species. "Also, at times like these when global warming and human interference on the natural world is so great, ringing provides data and evidences to support conservation initiatives that have the potential to benefit birds on threat."///END of TEXT///.

NOTES ;J'ai cherché un moment pour déchiffrer ringing j'ai pensé remplacer par with singing birds.Et en fait en relisant plusieurs fois tout le texte j ai pensé que non RINGING vient de RING l'anneau , la bague ,à baguer les oiseaux ou banging
-close to wildlife= près de,proche de (ce ne peut pas être closed)
-TRAINER=formateur
TRAINEE= stagiaire en l'occurence c'est bien à ce stade le stagiaire qui parle car après au début de la 3eme partie il parle de son trainer
-I AM A BIRDER=il y a été dans le passé et il y est toujours, l'action continue depuis de nombreuses années pour moi il faut mettre un présent perfect= HAVE BEEN
-UNWRAPPED =déballé mais ici on parle de filets je pense à déroulés, déployés, tendus = unfurled,unrolled,( unwrapped je l'utilise plutôt dans le sens de défaire un paquet cadeau).
-cack-handedly=maladroitement
Ce sont les principales difficultés que j'ai rencontrées et évidemment toujours les petits on , at, of, to que je suis obligée de chercher à chaque fois car je ne m'en souviens jamais
bon courage à tous et j'espère vous lire bientôt pour voir si j'ai bien réfléchi ou pas ?



Réponse : Rack Your Brains and Help!/ 69 de taiji43, postée le 01-05-2020 à 18:29:25 (S | E)
Dear Here an all my forum mates,
after many doubts , I send you my correction . It wasn’t a pastime as you may think, but a pleasant brain-teaser

I WILL TRANSLATE THE FIRST PART

READY TO BE CORRECTED

Why I spend my weekends ringing (baguer OK) birds:
There is nothing quite like HOLDING wild birds. Their beauty, colours and behaviour never fail to astonish: the blue tit, so common in THE UK, turns out to be the most aggressive, THE pecky little bird INIMAGINABLE the goldcrest -

the weight of a 20p coin - so tiny; the sparrowhawk, a quite rarity to trap, with its murderous look and ( heels =talon ici ce sont des serres) = TALONS)
The chance of getting CLOSER THIS wildlife was one of the factors that attracted me to the surprising and challenging THE world of Bird ringing (le baguage des oiseaux. Long before dawn this WINTER'S morning , small groups of people all around Britain will wake up to spend several hours in the cold, marshes, on beaches and sea cliffs. Their goal ? To trap birds of AS many species as possible in high nets, to measure them, age them, place a lightweight ring with a unique serial number ON their right FOOT ( patte pour un oiseau) and release them, as part of a huge citizen science project which HAS lasted more than a century now./( lien avec le présent)

// END of PART ONE ///
Joining this project as a TRAINEE , which I did a little more than a year ago, was a startling and rather humbling experience.

It remains so. I HAVE BEEN a birder (not a twitcher, please) for many years. I can identify many DOZENS of different species BY sight and BY their SONGS (un S malgré que chaque oiseau à son chant) ????? even if there are always plenty of people in the bird hides who know more than me.
What was a surprise TO me was that hundreds of thousands of birds actually MIGRATED to Britain in the winter.

Ou ringing group arrives at the bird reserve two hours before sunrise, to put up the 10ft high mist nets. Some reserves have fixed nets that can be( unwrapped =ouvrir , défaire ; UNFURLED = déployé serait mieux )very easily.

Ours are erected afresh each time because we move them depending ON the season - no point putting a lot of nets up in the reed beds when the reed warblers are away until late April in sub-Saharan Africa.

It would be wrong, however, to explain the motivation of Bird ringing baguage des oiseaux) as purely a dispassionate collection of DATA ./// END of PART TWO///

As my trainer explains, it's also a matter of curiosity. « Migration fascinates me, especially IN SUMMER (sans le the )when we're ringing reed warblers from Africa. »

The training to become A ringer is rigorous, under the close supervision of an experienced ringer, and lasts around two years.
Mistakes are easy to MAKE - how many birds have I released too early through not holding them firmly ENOUGH; or mis-identified, (mal identifier OK) or (GET their age and sex IN A WRONG WAY,) or cack-handedly put the ring on THE wrong. (BIRD)???

Bird extraction from the mist nets is a skill I have found very hard to learn. The vast DATA sets collected on common birds such as the blue tit can be used to understand what's happening to scarcer species. "Also, at times like these when global warming and human interference on the natural world is so great, ringing provides data and EVIDENCE to support conservation initiatives that have the potential to benefit birds on threat."///END of TEXT///



Réponse : Rack Your Brains and Help!/ 69 de maya92, postée le 02-05-2020 à 14:20:20 (S | E)
Hello Here4u,

Why I spend my weekends ringing birds:
There is nothing quite like HOLDING wild birds. Their beauty, colours and behaviour never fail to astonish: the blue tit, so common in THE UK, turns out to be the most aggressive, pecky little bird imaginable; the goldcrest - the weight of a 20p coin - so tiny; the sparrowhawk, quite A rarity to trap, with its murderous EYES and TALONS.
The chance of getting this close TO wildlife was one of the factors that attracted me to the surprising and challenging world of bird ringing. Long before dawn this WINTRY morning, small groups of people all around Britain will wake up to spend several hours in the cold, in marshes, on beaches and sea cliffs. Their goal? To trap birds of AS many species as possible in high nets, to measure them, age them, place a lightweight ring with a unique serial number ROUND their right leg and release them, as part of a huge citizen science project which HAS lasted more than a century now./// END of PART ONE ///

Joining this project as a TRAINEE, which I did a little more than a year ago, was a startling and rather humbling experience.
It remains so. I HAVE BEEN a birder (not a twitcher, please) for many years. I can identify many dozenS of different species
BY sight and BY their song, even if there are always plenty of people in the bird hides who know more than me.
What was a surprise for me was that hundreds of thousands of birds actually migrate to Britain in () winter. Our ringing group arrives at the bird reserve two hours before sunrise, to put up the 10ft high mist nets. Some reserves have fixed nets that can be unwrapped very easily. Ours are erected afresh each time because we move them depending ON the season - no point putting a lot of nets up in the reed beds when the reed warblers are away until late April in sub-Saharan Africa. It would be wrong, however, to explain the motivation of bird ringing as purely a dispassionate collection of data. (SINGULAR DATUM)/// END of PART TWO//

As my trainer explains, it's also a matter of curiosity. « Migration fascinates me, especially during the summer when we're ringing reed warblers from Africa. »
The training to become A ringer is rigorous, under the close supervision of an experienced ringer, and lasts around two years. Mistakes are easy to MAKE - how many birds have I released too early BY not holding them firmly ENOUGH; or mis-identified, or got their age and sex wrong, or cack-handedly put the ring on WRONGLY. Bird extraction from the mist nets is a skill I have found very hard to learn. The vast datas sets collected on common birds such as the blue tit can be used to understand what's happening to scarcer species. "Also, at times like these when global warming and human interference on the natural world is so great, ringing provides data and EVIDENCE to support conservation initiatives that have the potential to benefit birds on threat."///END of TEXT///.

Thank u - Have a nice Week-end



Réponse : Rack Your Brains and Help!/ 69 de alpiem, postée le 06-05-2020 à 19:51:12 (S | E)
Rackck Your Brains and Help!/ 69 HELLO COACHES AND FRIENDS
Ready for correction

He has left 22 mistakes in this text…
Why I spend my weekends ringing birds:
There is nothing quite like HOLDING ON TO wild birds. Their beauty, colours and behaviour never fail to astonish: the blue tit, so common in THE UK, turns out to be the most aggressive,IMAGINABLE PECKISH little bird; the goldcrest - the weight of a 20p coin - so tiny; the sparrowhawk, a quite rarity to trap, with its murderous look and TALONS.
The chance of GETTING IN WITH this closed wildlife was one of the factors that attracted me to the surprising and challenging world of bird ringing. Long before dawn this winter morning, small groups of people all around GREAT-Britain will wake up to spend several hours in the cold, in marshes, on beaches and sea cliffs. Their goal IS TO trap birds of AS many species as possible in high nets, to measure them, age them, place a lightweight ring with a unique serial number at their right legS and release them, as part of a huge citizen science project LONGSTANDING FOR more than a century NOW./// END of PART ONE ///

Joining this project as a trainer, which I did a little more than a year ago, was a startling and rather humbling experience.It remains so. I'VE BEEN a birder (not a TWITTER, please) for many years. I can identify many dozenS of different species on sight and FROM their songS, even if there are always plenty of people in the bird hides who know more than me. 12
What was a surprise for me IS that hundreds of thousands of birds actually migrate to GREAT Britain IN winter. Our ringing group arrives at the bird reserve two hours before sunrise, to put up WITH the 10ft-HIGH mist nets. Some reserves have GOT fixed nets that can be unwrapped very easily. Ours are erected afresh each time because we move them depending of the season - no point putting a lot of nets up in the reed beds when the reed warblers are away until late April in sub-Saharan Africa. It would be wrong, however, to explain the motivation of bird ringing as purely a dispassionate collection of datas./// END of PART TWO///

As my trainer explains, it's also a matter of curiosity. « Migration fascinates me, especially during the summer when we're ringing reed warblers from Africa. »
The training to become ringer is rigorous, under the close supervision of an experienced ringer, and lasts FOR around two years. Mistakes are easy to do - how many birds have I released too early through not holding them enough firmly; or mis-identifYING, or GETTING their age and sex wrong, or cack-handedly putTING the ring on A wrong Bird . EXTRACTION
from the mist nets is a skill I have found very hard to learn. The vast DATA sets collected on common birds such as the blue tit can be used to understand what's happening to scarcer species. "Also, at times like these when global warming and human interference on the natural world is so great, ringing provides data and PIECES OF EVIDENCE to support
conservation initiatives that have the potential to benefit birds on threat." ///END of TEXT///.


------------------
Modifié par lucile83 le 07-05-2020 18:21
Mise en forme standard




Réponse : Rack Your Brains and Help!/ 69 de here4u, postée le 10-05-2020 à 21:29:02 (S | E)
Hello!

Encore quelques jours ... Chop, chop...

Je commence à poster vos corrections ...




Réponse : Rack Your Brains and Help!/ 69 de magie8, postée le 11-05-2020 à 13:07:32 (S | E)
BONJOUR j AI bien reçu ma correction merci beaucoup donc je peux terminer la traduction je vous posterai la 1ere partie le 13 mai .je VOUS SOUHAITE BON SANTE ET BON COURAGE A TOUS



Réponse : Rack Your Brains and Help!/ 69 de joe39, postée le 11-05-2020 à 17:59:41 (S | E)
like the birds of the article which are ringed, we are now subjected to be isolated, checked and forced to stay locked down in our homes, with the only option to send you our works,
ready for correction…………

Why I spend my weekends ringing birds:
There is nothing quite like HOLDING - 1 wild birds. Their beauty, colours and behaviour never fail to astonish: the blue tit, so common in THE UK - 2, turns out to be the most aggressive, pecky little bird imaginable; the goldcrest - the weight of a 20p coin - so tiny; the sparrowhawk, QUITE A RARITY – 3 - to trap, with its murderous look and TALONS - 4.
The chance of getting this CLOSE TO - 5 wildlife was one of the factors that attracted me to the surprising and challenging world of bird ringing.
Long before dawn this winter morning, small groups of people all around Britain will wake up to spend several hours in the cold, in marshes, on beaches and sea cliffs. Their goal? To trap birds of AS - 6 many species as possible in high nets, to measure them, age them, place a lightweight ring with a unique serial number ON – 7 their right leg and release them, as part of a huge citizen science project which HAS - 8 lasted more than a century now./// END of PART ONE ///

Joining this project as a TRAINEE - 9, which I did a little more than a year ago, was a startling and rather humbling experience.
It remains so. I HAVE BEEN - 10 a birder (not a twitcher, please) for many years. I can identify many DOZENS – 11 of different species
BY – 12 sight and BY their song, even if there are always plenty of people in the bird hides who know more than me.
What was a surprise TO - 13 me was that hundreds of thousands of birds actually migrate to Britain in the winter. Our ringing group arrives at the bird reserve two hours before sunrise, to put up the 10ft high mist nets. Some reserves have fixed nets that can be UNFURLED - 14very easily. Ours are erected afresh each time because we move them depending ON – 15 the season - no point putting a lot of nets up in the reed beds when the reed warblers are away until late April in sub-Saharan Africa. It would be wrong, however, to explain the motivation of bird ringing as purely a dispassionate collection of DATA. - 16/// END of PART TWO///

As my trainer explains, it's also a matter of curiosity. « Migration fascinates me, especially during the summer when we're ringing reed warblers from Africa. »
The training to become ringer is rigorous, under the close supervision of an experienced ringer, and lasts around two years. Mistakes are easy to MAKE – 17 how many birds have I released too early through not holding them FIRMLY ENOUGH - 18; or mis-identified, or got their age and sex wrong, or cack-handedly put the ring on wrong. Bird extraction from the mist nets is a skill I have found very hard to learn.
The vast DATA sets collected on common birds such as the blue tit can be used to understand what's happening to scarcer species. "Also, at times like these when global warming and human interference on the natural world is so great, ringing provides data and EVIDENCE - 19 to support conservation initiatives that have the potential to benefit birds UNDER – 20 threat."///END of TEXT///.

……..hoping not to become a scarce species.

I wish you a pleasant evening, thanking for the nice exercise.

So long
Joe 39



Réponse : Rack Your Brains and Help!/ 69 de chocolatcitron, postée le 12-05-2020 à 00:33:04 (S | E)
Rack Your Brains and Help!/ 69
Message de here4u posté le 28-04-2020 à 22:32:41 (S | E | F) le mardi 12 mai, tard
Hello my dear Here4u, thanks for this great text : of course, I DO love it ❤️!!!FINISHED !

MY STUDENT.has left 22 mistakes in this text… - some are recurring!
Ce texte va vous faire échapper pour retrouver les oiseaux ... Un excellent bol d’air… !

Here is my work:
Why I spend my weekends ringing birds:
There is nothing quite like 1 =HOLDING wild birds. Their beauty, colours and behaviour never fail to astonish: the blue tit, so common in 2 =THE UK, turns out to be the most aggressive, pecky (peck = coups de bec) little bird imaginable; the goldcrest - the weight of a 20p coin - so tiny; the sparrowhawk, quite 3 = A rarity to trap, with its murderous look and 4 = TALONS.
The chance of getting this 5 = CLOSE TO wildlife was one of the factors that attracted me to the surprising and challenging world of bird ringing. Long before dawn this winter morning, small groups of people all around Britain will wake up to spend several hours in the cold, in marshes, on beaches and sea cliffs. Their goal? To trap birds of 6 = AS many species as possible in high nets, to measure them, age them, place a lightweight ring with a unique serial number 7 = ON/AROUND their right leg and release them, as part of a huge citizen science project which 8 = HAS lasted more than a century now./// END of PART ONE ///
Joining this project as a 9 = TRAINEE, which I did a little more than a year ago, was a startling and rather humbling experience.
It remains so. I 10 = HAVE BEEN a birder (not a twitcher, please) for many years. I 11 = COULD identify many 12 = DOZENS of different species 13 = BY sight and 13 bis BY their song, even if there are always plenty of people in the bird hides who know more than me. 12
What was a surprise 14 = TO was that hundreds of thousands of birds actually migrate to Britain in the winter.
Our ringing group arrives at the bird reserve two hours before sunrise, to put up the 10ft (= 3m) high mist nets. Some reserves have fixed nets that can be 15 = UNFURLED very easily. Ours are erected afresh each time because we move them depending 16 = ON the season - no point putting a lot of nets up in the reed beds when the reed warblers are away until late April in sub-Saharan Africa.
It would be wrong, however, to explain the motivation of bird ringing as purely a dispassionate collection of 17 = DATA./// END of PART TWO///
As my trainer explains, it's also a matter of curiosity. « Migration fascinates me, especially during the summer when we're ringing reed warblers from Africa. » The training to become ringer is rigorous, under the close supervision of an experienced ringer, and lasts around two years. Mistakes are easy to 18 = MAKE - how many birds have I released too early through not holding them firmly 19 = ENOUGH; or mis-identified, or got their age and sex wrong, or cack-handedly put the ring on wrong. Bird extraction from the mist nets is a skill I have found very hard to learn.
The vast 18 bis DATA sets collected on common birds such as the blue tit can be used to understand what's happening to scarcer species.
"Also, at times like these when global warming and human interference on the natural world is so great, ringing provides data and 20 = EVIDENCE to support conservation initiatives that have the potential to benefit birds 21 = UNDER threat."///END of TEXT///.

Here are my explanations:
1 = There is nothing quite like held = Il n’y a rien de tel que les oiseaux sauvages détenus.
There is nothing quite like HOLDING wild birds = Il n’y a rien de tel que de tenir des oiseaux sauvages.
2 = The UK, nom de pays composé, donc il faut l’article défini the.
pecky (peck = coups de bec) little bird imaginable.
3 = a a été mal placé dans « quite A rarity to trap »
4 = heels = talons du pied ou des chaussures… TALONS = serres d’un oiseau.
5 = closed (non pas de participe passé=, CLOSE TO wildlife
6 = of so = non, of AS many species as = as + quantité + as.
7 = at = non, soit ON soit AROUND their right leg puisque la bague fait le tour de leur patte droite avec un petit espacement pour ne pas créer un garot.
8 = which HAS lasted
9 = trainer = formateur (celui qui sait), as a TRAINEE= stagiaire
10 = I'm HAVE BEEN a birder (elle l’a été et elle l’est toujours : cela fait partie de ses compétences et savoir-faire.
11 = I can (non passé) COULD identify
12 = many dozen DOZENS of = pluriel à dozens car suivi de of.
13 = different species on BY sight and on BY their song
14 = What was a surprise for TO
15 = unwrapped = non emballés, non empaquetés… ? UNFURLED = se déployer, se dérouler.
16 = depending of ON = to dépend on… = dépendre de.
17 = datas DATA = data est invariable et a déjà le sens pluriel = les données.
18 = Mistakes are easy to do MAKE = to make a mistake !
19 = through not holding them enough firmly ENOUGH (enough est rejeté au bout de l’expression.
20 = evidences EVIDENCE = evidence est déjà un pluriel : les preuves.
21 = on UNDER threat. = to be under threat = être menacé.
22 = ???

My translation:
Pourquoi je passe mes week-ends à baguer les oiseaux:
Il n’y a rien de tel que de tenir des oiseaux sauvages. Leur beauté, leurs couleurs et leurs comportements ne manquent jamais d’étonner : la mésange bleue, si commune au Royaume-Uni, s’avère être le petit oiseau le plus agressif et donnant des coups de becs inimaginables ; le roitelet huppé - le poids d’une pièce de 20p - si minuscule; l’épervier, tout à fait une rareté à piéger, avec son regard meurtrier et ses serres.
La chance de se rapprocher de la faune sauvage a été l’un des facteurs qui m’a attiré dans le monde surprenant et stimulant du baguage des oiseaux.
Bien avant l’aube ce matin d’hiver, de petits groupes de personnes dans toute la Grande-Bretagne se réveilleront pour passer plusieurs heures dans le froid, dans les marais, sur les plages et les falaises marines. Leur but ? Pour piéger les oiseaux le plus grand nombre d’espèces possible dans des filets hauts, afin de les mesurer, évaluer leur âge, placer un anneau léger avec un numéro de série unique sur leur patte droite et les libérer, dans le cadre d’un énorme projet scientifique citoyen qui dure depuis plus d’un siècle maintenant.
Le fait de rejoindre ce projet en tant que stagiaire, ce que j’ai fait il y a un peu plus d’un an, a été une expérience surprenante et plutôt humble. Ça continue. J’ai été ornithologue (pas un ornithologue amateur, s’il vous plaît) pendant de nombreuses années. Je pourrais identifier plusieurs dizaines d’espèces différentes à la vue et par leur chant, même s’il y a toujours beaucoup de gens à l’affût d’oiseaux qui en savent plus que moi.
Ce qui m’a également surpris, c’est que des centaines de milliers d’oiseaux migrent en Grande-Bretagne en hiver.
Notre groupe de bagueurs arrive à la réserve d’oiseaux deux heures avant le lever du soleil, pour mettre en place les filets de brume de 3 m de haut. Certaines réserves ont des filets fixes qui peuvent être déployés très facilement. Les nôtres sont érigés à nouveau à chaque fois parce que nous les déplaçons en fonction de la saison - inutile de mettre beaucoup de filets dans les roseaux lorsque les parulines de roseaux sont absentes en Afrique subsaharienne jusqu’à la fin avril.
Il serait toutefois erroné d’expliquer la motivation du baguage des oiseaux comme une collecte de données purement impartiale.
Comme l’explique mon formateur, c’est aussi une question de curiosité. "La migration me fascine, surtout pendant l’été quand nous baguons des parulines de roseaux venant d’Afrique
La formation, pour devenir bagueur, est rigoureuse, sous la supervision étroite d’un bagueur expérimenté, et dure environ deux ans. Les erreurs sont faciles à commettre - combien d’oiseaux ai-je libéré trop tôt en ne les tenant pas assez fermement; ou mal identifié, ou a mal évalué leur âge et je me suis trompé de sexe, ou de manière maladroite j’ai mis l’anneau sur le mauvais. L’extraction d’oiseaux des filets de brume est une compétence que j’ai trouvé très difficile à apprendre.
Les vastes quantités de données recueillies sur les oiseaux communs tels que la mésange bleue peuvent être utilisés pour comprendre ce qui arrive aux espèces plus rares.
«En outre, dans des moments comme ceux-ci où le réchauffement climatique et l’interférence humaine sur le monde naturel sont si importants, le baguage fournit des données et des preuves à l’appui des initiatives de conservation qui ont le potentiel de bénéficier énormément aux oiseaux menacés.

May THE FORCE be with you...
Take care and have a very sweet week!
See you soon.



Réponse : Rack Your Brains and Help!/ 69 de maya92, postée le 12-05-2020 à 17:03:58 (S | E)
Hello Here4u,

Pourquoi je passe mes week-end à baguer des oiseaux :
Il n’y a rien de tel que de s’occuper d’oiseaux sauvages. Leur beauté, leurs couleurs et leur comportement ne manquent jamais d’étonner : la mésange bleue si commune au Royaume-Uni se révèle la plus aggressive donneuse de coups de bec, le roitelet huppé qui pèse le poids d’une pièce de 20p, si petit, l’épervier tellement rare à piéger avec son regard meurtrier et ses serres. La chance de se trouver aussi près de la vie sauvage fut une des raisons qui m’a attiré dans le monde surprenant et compétitif du baguage des oiseaux. Bien avant l’aube par un matin d’hiver, des petits groupes de personnes dans toute la Grande-Bretagne vont passer plusieurs heures dans le froid, dans les marécages, sur les plages et les falaises. Leur but ? Piéger autant d’espèces possibles d’oiseaux dans de grands filets pour les mesurer, leur attribuer un âge, cercler leur patte droite d’un petit anneau léger avec un numéro de série unique puis les relâcher. Celà fait partie d’un vaste projet scientifique vieux de plus d’un siècle à présent.
Rallier ce projet en tant que stagiaire, ce que j’ai fait il y a un peu plus d’un an, a été une expérience surprenante qui rend modeste. Ca l’est toujours. J’ai été un ornithologue (pas un amateur) pendant de nombreuses années. Je peux identifier plusieurs douzaines d’espèces différentes en les voyant ou en entendant leur chant même si de nombreuses personnes à l’affût d’oiseaux en savent plus que moi. Ce qui a été une surprise pour moi, c’est qu’en fait, des centaines de milliers d’oiseaux migrent en Grande-Bretagne en hiver. Notre groupe de bagueurs arrive à la réserve d’oiseaux deux heures avant le lever du soleil pour installer des filets de plus de 3 mètres de haut. Quelques réserves ont des filets fixes qui peuvent être déroulés très facilement. Les nôtres sont réinstallés à chaque fois parce que nous les déplaçons suivant la saison. Ca n’est pas la peine d’installer des filets dans les roselières alors que les fauvettes des roseaux sont en Afrique sub-saharienne jusqu’à fin avril. Il serait faux cependant de dire que les motivations des bagueurs ne sont qu’un froid recueil de données.
Comme l’explique mon moniteur, c’est aussi une question de curiosité. “La migration me fascine surtout pendant l’été lorsque nous baguons des fauvettes des roseaux qui viennent d’Afrique.” L’apprentissage de bagueur est rigoureux, sous la surveillance attentive d’un bagueur confirmé et dure environ deux ans. Il est facile de faire des fautes – combien d’oiseaux ai-je relachés trop tôt parce que je ne les tenais pas assez fermement ; ou que j’ai mal identifiés ou mal defini leur âge ou leur sexe ou auxquels j’ai mal mis l’anneau. J’ai trouvé très difficile d’apprendre à extraire les oiseaux des filets. Les vastes données collectées sur les oiseaux communs tels que la mésange peuvent aider à comprendre ce qui arrive à des espèces plus rares. Et dans les périodes actuelles alors que le réchauffement de la planète et l’ingérence de l’homme dans le milieu naturel sont aussi considérables, le baguage fournit des données et des preuves qui permettent de soutenir ces initiatives de conservation et qui peuvent bénéficier aux espèces en péril.

Tu ne l'as pas réclamée mais je pense que tu voulais la traduction du texte ...Voilà c'est fait



Réponse : Rack Your Brains and Help!/ 69 de here4u, postée le 12-05-2020 à 23:03:06 (S | E)
Hello, dear Hardworkers!

Voici votre correction ! En général, d’après ce que vous m’avez dit, vous avez apprécié ce texte qui vous a un peu déroutés au début … Cependant, après plusieurs lectures attentives, vous l'avez trouvé relativement facile … Toutes les fautes ont été trouvées.
Je vous rappelle que pour la suite de votre travail (le Follow-Up Work) nous avons encore besoin de DEUX VOLONTAIRES pour préparer la version (pas facile) de ce texte un peu technique et riche en vocabulaire … (et là, il redevient "un peu" compliqué ... )

There is nothing quite like holding(1) wild birds. Their beauty, colours and behaviour never fail to astonish: the blue tit, so common in the UK(2), turns out to be the most aggressive, pecky little bird imaginable; the goldcrest - the weight of a 20p coin - so tiny; the sparrowhawk, quite a rarity to trap (3), with its murderous look and talons.(4)
The chance of getting this close to (5) wildlife was one of the factors that attracted me to the surprising and challenging world of bird ringing. Long before dawn this winter morning, small groups of people all around Britain will wake up to spend several hours in the cold, in marshes, on beaches and sea cliffs. Their goal? To trap birds of as many(6) species as possible in high nets, to measure them, age them, place a lightweight ring with a unique serial number on their right leg (7)and release them, as part of a huge citizen science project which has lasted (8) more than a century now./// END of PART ONE /// Joining this project as a trainee(9), which I did a little more than a year ago, was a startling and rather humbling experience. It remains so. I've been a birder (10)(not a twitcher, please) for many years. I can identify dozens (11) of different species by sight and by their song (12), even if there are always plenty of people in the bird hides who know more than me. What was a surprise to me (13) was that hundreds of thousands of birds actually migrate to Britain in the winter. Our ringing group arrives at the bird reserve two hours before sunrise, to put up the 10ft high mist nets. Some reserves have fixed nets that can be unfurled (14) very easily. Ours are erected afresh each time because we move them depending on (15) the season - no point putting a lot of nets up in the reed beds when the reed warblers are away until late April in sub-Saharan Africa. It would be wrong, however, to explain the motivation of bird ringing as purely a dispassionate collection of data (16)./// END of PART TWO/// As my trainer explains, it's also a matter of curiosity. « Migration fascinates me, especially during the summer when we're ringing reed warblers from Africa. »
The training to become a ringer (17) is rigorous, under the close supervision of an experienced ringer, and lasts around two years. Mistakes are easy to make (18) - how many birds have I released too early through not holding them firmly enough (19); or mis-identified, or got their age and sex wrong, or cack-handedly put the ring on wrong. Bird extraction from the mist nets is a skill I have found very hard to learn. The vast data (16) sets collected on common birds such as (20) the blue tit can be used to understand what's happening to scarcer species. "Also, at times like these when global warming and human interference on the natural world is so great, ringing provides data and evidence (21) to support conservation initiatives that have the potential to benefit birds under threat(22)."///END of the TEXT///.


(1) « Held » est le participe passé de TO HOLD, I HELD, HELD= tenir, détenir ; ici, il fallait un gerondif => HOLDING birds.
(2) in the UK= in the United Kingdom; les pays formés de plusieurs états prennent l’article défini. (idem : the USA/ the Netherlands) (Great Britain= England, Scotland, Wales; The United Kingdom= Great Britain+ Northern Ireland)
(3) quite a rarity to trap: attention à l’ordre des mots (QUITE A + nom)
(4) ATTENTION: a heel= un talon mais Lien internet
= les serres d’un oiseau.
(5) close to wildlife: close to= près de = near. Ne pas confondre avec "to close=> closed"= fermer.
(6) as many species as possible = comparatif d’égalité employé avec un nom dénombrable pluriel => as many + dénombrable + as …
(7) on their right leg= sur la patte droite.
(8) a huge citizen science project which has lasted more than a century now.= un projet qui dure encore (le present perfect indique que le projet a commencé dans le passé et se poursuit encore maintenant).
(9) Ne pas confondre : a trainee et a trainer. Lien internet
// Lien internet

(10) I've been a birder for many years= present perfect de bilan. A birder= Lien internet
mais PAS Lien internet
qui insisterait sur l’amateurisme des intervenants.
(11) dozens of different species= cf leçon Lien internet

(12) … species BY sight and BY their song: Lien internet

(13) a surprise to me: Lien internet

(14) unwrapped: Lien internet
/// unfurl: Lien internet

(15) … depending on the season: to depend ON something
(16) a collection of ** // ** « data » est le pluriel latin de « datum ». Lien internet

(17) … training to become a ringer: he is a doctor/ she’ll become a nurse… devant toutes les occupations et métiers employés après un verbe d’état => article indéfini obligatoire.
(18) Mistakes are easy to make: to MAKE a mistake: Lien internet

(19) them firmly enough… place de "enough": Lien internet

(20) "such as"= comme : Lien internet

(21) evidence= des preuves ; = indénombrable (reste invariable et verbe singulier)
(22) to be under threat= Lien internet
= an endangered species= une espèce menacée.

Le texte entier a déjà été traduit deux fois ... (vous êtes déchaînées ... ) Je vous rappelle que je corrigerai tous les "doublons" ...
Courage à tous et merci pour cet excellent travail !



Réponse : Rack Your Brains and Help!/ 69 de here4u, postée le 13-05-2020 à 09:44:30 (S | E)
Hello you All!

Here's the correction of the Follow-up-Work...

There is nothing quite like holding wild birds. Their beauty, colours and behaviour never fail to astonish: the blue tit, so common in the UK, turns out to be the most aggressive, pecky little bird imaginable; the goldcrest - the weight of a 20p coin - so tiny; the sparrowhawk, quite a rarity to trap, with its murderous look and talons.
The chance of getting this close to wildlife was one of the factors that attracted me to the surprising and challenging world of bird ringing. Long before dawn this winter morning, small groups of people all around Britain will wake up to spend several hours in the cold, in marshes, on beaches and sea cliffs. Their goal? To trap birds of as many species as possible in high nets, to measure them, age them, place a lightweight ring with a unique serial number on their right leg and release them, as part of a huge citizen science project which has lasted more than a century now./// END of PART ONE ///

Pourquoi je passe mes week-ends à baguer les oiseaux:
Il n’y a rien de tel que de tenir des oiseaux sauvages. Leur beauté, leurs couleurs et leurs comportements ne manquent jamais d’étonner : la mésange bleue, si commune au Royaume-Uni, s’avère être le petit oiseau le plus agressif et donnant des coups de becs inimaginables (s'applique à "the blue tit"...= singulier!) ; le roitelet huppé - le poids d'(qui pèse comme )une pièce de 20p - si minuscule; l’épervier, tout à fait une rareté à piéger (capturer), avec son regard meurtrier et ses serres.
La chance de se rapprocher(*) de la faune sauvage a été l’un des facteurs qui m’a/ m'ont attiré dans le monde surprenant et stimulant du baguage des oiseaux.
Bien avant l’aube ce matin d’hiver, de petits groupes de personnes dans toute la Grande-Bretagne se réveilleront(= will fréquentatif => d'habitude !) pour passer plusieurs heures dans le froid, dans les marais, sur les plages et les falaises marines. Leur but ? Pour piéger(capturer) les oiseaux le du plus grand nombre d’espèces possible dans des filets hauts, afin de les mesurer, d'évaluer leur âge, de placer un anneau léger avec un numéro de série unique sur leur patte droite et de les libérer, dans le cadre d’un énorme projet scientifique citoyen qui dure depuis plus d’un siècle maintenant.

Choco et BRAVO !

* this/ that close= as close as that= d'aussi près ...

Pourquoi je passe mes week-end à baguer des oiseaux :
Il n’y a rien de tel que de s’occuper d’oiseaux sauvages. Leur beauté, leurs couleurs et leur comportement ne manquent jamais d’étonner : la mésange bleue si commune au Royaume-Uni se révèle la plus aggressive donneuse de coups de bec , le roitelet huppé qui pèse le poids d’une pièce de 20p, si petit, l’épervier tellement rare à piéger (capturer) avec son regard meurtrier et ses serres. La chance de se trouver aussi près de la vie sauvage fut l'une des raisons qui m’a attiré dans le monde surprenant et compétitif du baguage des oiseaux. Bien avant l’aube par un matin d’hiver, des petits groupes de personnes dans toute la Grande-Bretagne vont passer plusieurs heures dans le froid, dans les marécages, sur les plages et sur les falaises. Leur but ? Piéger (Capturer) autant d’espèces possibles d’oiseaux dans de grands filets pour les mesurer, leur attribuer un âge, cercler leur patte droite d’un petit anneau léger avec un numéro de série unique puis les relâcher. Cela fait partie d’un vaste projet scientifique vieux de plus d’un siècle à présent.

Maya. Excellent compte-rendu!

Pourquoi je passe mes week-ends à baguer des oiseaux: Il n'y a rien de tel que de tenir des oiseaux sauvages. Leur beauté, leurs couleurs et leur comportement ne manquent jamais d'étonner : la mésange bleue, si commune au Royaume-Uni s'avère être le petit oiseau le plus agressif à donner des coups de bec que l'on puisse imaginer. Le roitelet à crête d'or - qui pèse le poids d'une pièce de 20P- un nickel- si minuscule; l'épervier, espèce assez difficile à piéger (capturer) avec son regard meurtier et ses serres.
La chance de pouvoir s'approcher de si près de la faune sauvage fut l'un des facteurs qui m'ont attiré dans le monde surprenant et stimulant du baguage des oiseaux. Bien avant l'aube de ce matin d'hiver, des petits groupes de personnes dans toute la Grande-Bretagne se réveillent pour passer plusieurs heures dans le froid, dans les marais, sur les plages et sur les falaises. Leur objectif ?capturer le maximum d'espèces d'oiseaux possible dans de vastes filets pour les mesurer, déterminer leur âge, placer un anneau léger avec un numéro de série unique sur leur patte droite et les relâcher dans le cadre d'un grand projet scientifique citoyen qui dure depuis plus d'un siècle maintenant.
good work, Magie!


Joining this project as a trainee, which I did a little more than a year ago, was a startling and rather humbling experience. It remains so. I've been a birder (not a twitcher, please) for many years. I can identify dozens of different species by sight and by their song, even if there are always plenty of people in the bird hides who know more than me. What was a surprise to me was that hundreds of thousands of birds actually migrate to Britain in the winter. Our ringing group arrives at the bird reserve two hours before sunrise, to put up the 10ft high mist nets. Some reserves have fixed nets that can be unfurled very easily. Ours are erected afresh each time because we move them depending on the season - no point putting a lot of nets up in the reed beds when the reed warblers are away until late April in sub-Saharan Africa. It would be wrong, however, to explain the motivation of bird ringing as purely a dispassionate collection of data./// END of PART TWO///

Le fait de rejoindre ce projet en tant que stagiaire, ce que j’ai fait il y a un peu plus d’un an, a été une expérience surprenante et plutôt humble. Ça continue. J’ai été *= JE SUIS ornithologue (pas un ornithologue amateur, s’il vous plaît) pendant depuis de nombreuses années. Je pourrais identifier plusieurs dizaines d’espèces différentes à la vue et par leur chant, même s’il y a toujours beaucoup de gens à l’affût d’oiseaux qui en savent plus que moi.
Ce qui m’a également surpris, c’est que des centaines de milliers d’oiseaux migrent en Grande-Bretagne en hiver.
Notre groupe de bagueurs arrive à la réserve d’oiseaux deux heures avant le lever du soleil, pour mettre en place les filets de brume de 3 m de haut. Certaines réserves ont des filets fixes qui peuvent être déployés très facilement. Les nôtres sont érigés à nouveau à chaque fois parce que nous les déplaçons en fonction de la saison - inutile de mettre beaucoup de filets dans les roseaux lorsque les parulines de roseaux sont absentes en Afrique subsaharienne jusqu’à la fin avril.
dear Magie!

Rallier ce projet en tant que stagiaire, ce que j’ai fait il y a un peu plus d’un an, a été une expérience surprenante qui rend modeste. Ca l’est toujours. J’ai été * JE SUIS un ornithologue (pas un amateur) pendant depuis de nombreuses années. Je peux identifier plusieurs douzaines d’espèces différentes en les voyant ou en entendant leur chant même si de nombreuses personnes à l’affût d’oiseaux en savent plus que moi. Ce qui a été une surprise pour moi, c’est qu’en fait, des centaines de milliers d’oiseaux migrent en Grande-Bretagne en hiver. Notre groupe de bagueurs arrive à la réserve d’oiseaux deux heures avant le lever du soleil pour installer des filets de plus de 3 mètres de haut. Quelques réserves ont des filets fixes qui peuvent être déroulés très facilement. Les nôtres sont réinstallés à chaque fois parce que nous les déplaçons suivant la saison. Ca n’est pas la peine d’installer des filets dans les roselières alors que les fauvettes des roseaux sont en Afrique sub-saharienne jusqu’à fin avril. Il serait faux cependant de dire que les motivations des bagueurs ne sont qu’un froid recueil de données.
Maya et Bravo !

* N'oubliez pas que le PRESENT PERFECT est un présent! (en français ...)= la faute qui est pourtant connue ... mais que beaucoup font quand même !

As my trainer explains, it's also a matter of curiosity. « Migration fascinates me, especially during the summer when we're ringing reed warblers from Africa. »
The training to become a ringer is rigorous, under the close supervision of an experienced ringer, and lasts around two years. Mistakes are easy to make - how many birds have I released too early through not holding them firmly enough; or mis-identified, or got their age and sex wrong, or cack-handedly put the ring on wrong. Bird extraction from the mist nets is a skill I have found very hard to learn. The vast data sets collected on common birds such as the blue tit can be used to understand what's happening to scarcer species. "Also, at times like these when global warming and human interference on the natural world is so great, ringing provides data and evidence to support conservation initiatives that have the potential to benefit birds under threat."///END of the TEXT///.

Comme l’explique mon formateur, c’est aussi une question de curiosité. "La migration me fascine, surtout pendant l’été quand nous baguons des parulines de roseaux venant d’Afrique.
La formation pour devenir bagueur est rigoureuse sous la supervision étroite d’un bagueur expérimenté, et dure environ deux ans. Les erreurs sont faciles à commettre - combien d’oiseaux ai-je libéré trop tôt en ne les tenant pas assez fermement ; ou mal identifié, ou a mal évalué leur âge et je me suis trompé de sexe, ou de manière maladroite j’ai mis l’anneau sur le mauvais.Non! ici, wrong est un adverbe= wrongly=> "J'ai mal mis la bague;" L’extraction d’oiseaux des filets de brume est une compétence que j’ai trouvée très difficile à apprendre.
Les vastes quantités de données recueillies sur les oiseaux communs tels que la mésange bleue peuvent être utilisées pour comprendre ce qui arrive aux espèces plus rares.
«En outre, dans des moments comme ceux-ci où le réchauffement climatique et l’interférence humaine sur le monde naturel sont si importants, le baguage fournit des données et des preuves à l’appui des initiatives de conservation qui ont le potentiel de bénéficier énormément aux oiseaux menacés.
Encore Choco!


Comme l’explique mon moniteur, c’est aussi une question de curiosité. “La migration me fascine surtout pendant l’été lorsque nous baguons des fauvettes des roseaux qui viennent d’Afrique.” L’apprentissage de bagueur est rigoureux, sous la surveillance attentive d’un bagueur confirmé et dure environ deux ans. Il est facile de faire des fautes – combien d’oiseaux ai-je relachés trop tôt parce que je ne les tenais pas assez fermement ; ou que j’ai mal identifiés ou mal defini leur âge ou leur sexe ou auxquels j’ai mal mis l’anneau . J’ai trouvé très difficile d’apprendre à extraire les oiseaux des filets. Les vastes données collectées sur les oiseaux communs tels que la mésange peuvent aider à comprendre ce qui arrive à des espèces plus rares. Et dans les périodes actuelles alors que le réchauffement de la planète et l’ingérence de l’homme dans le milieu naturel sont aussi considérables, le baguage fournit des données et des preuves qui permettent de soutenir ces initiatives de conservation et qui peuvent bénéficier aux espèces en péril.
Encore Maya!

Un EXCELLENT travail de nos trois traductrices ... Ceux qui ont prévu de s'y risquer aussi peuvent le faire sans aucun problème ... Je corrigerai !



Réponse : Rack Your Brains and Help!/ 69 de magie8, postée le 13-05-2020 à 12:42:29 (S | E)
bonjour Lien internet

j' essaie de vous envoyer le lien vers les images de l'oiseau goldencrest petit roitelet huppé appelé aussi -la crête d'or-
voici MA VERSION
Pourquoi je passe mes week-ends à baguer des oiseaux:Il n'y a rien de tel que de tenir des oiseaux sauvages.Leur beauté,leurs couleurs et leur comportement ne manquent jamais d'étonner :la mésange bleue,si commune au Royaume-Uni s'avère être le petit oiseau le plus agressif à donner des coups de bec que l'on puisse imaginer.Le roitelet à crête d'or -le poids d'une pièce de 20P- un nikel- si minuscule;l'épervier,une espèce assez difficile à piéger avec son regard meurtier et ses serres.
La chance de pouvoir s'approcher de si près de la faune sauvage fut l'un des facteurs qui m'ont attiré dans le monde surprenant et stimulant du baguage des oiseaux.Bien avant l'aube de ce matin d'hiver , des petits groupes de personnes dans toute la Grande-Bretagne se réveillent pour passer plusieurs heures dans le froid,dans les marais,sur les plages;et sur les falaises.Leur onjectif?capturer le maximum d'espèces d'oiseaux possible dans des vastes filets pour les mesurer,déterminer leur âges,placer un anneau léger avec un numéro de série unique sur leur pattes droites et les relâcher dans le cadre d'un grand projet scientifique citoyen qui dure depuis plus d'un siècle maintenant.



Réponse : Rack Your Brains and Help!/ 69 de magie8, postée le 13-05-2020 à 13:12:39 (S | E)
Lien internet




Réponse : Rack Your Brains and Help!/ 69 de here4u, postée le 13-05-2020 à 20:24:32 (S | E)

A very cute goldcrest, indeed...





[POSTER UNE NOUVELLE REPONSE] [Suivre ce sujet]


Cours gratuits > Forum > Exercices du forum










Partager : Facebook / Twitter / ... 


> INDISPENSABLES : TESTEZ VOTRE NIVEAU | GUIDE DE TRAVAIL | NOS MEILLEURES FICHES | Les fiches les plus populaires | Une leçon par email par semaine | Aide/Contact

> COURS ET TESTS : -ing | AS / LIKE | Abréviations | Accord/Désaccord | Activités | Adjectifs | Adverbes | Alphabet | Animaux | Argent | Argot | Articles | Audio | Auxiliaires | Be | Betty | Chanson | Communication | Comparatifs/Superlatifs | Composés | Conditionnel | Confusions | Conjonctions | Connecteurs | Contes | Contractions | Contraires | Corps | Couleurs | Courrier | Cours | Dates | Dialogues | Dictées | Décrire | Ecole | En attente | Exclamations | Faire faire | Famille | Faux amis | Films | For ou since? | Formation | Futur | Fêtes | Genre | Get | Goûts | Grammaire | Guide | Géographie | Habitudes | Harry Potter | Have | Heure | Homonymes | Impersonnel | Infinitif | Internet | Inversion | Jeux | Journaux | Lettre manquante | Littérature | Magasin | Maison | Majuscules | Make/do? | Maladies | Mars | Matilda | Modaux | Mots | Mouvement | Musique | Mélanges | Méthodologie | Métiers | Météo | Nature | Neige | Nombres | Noms | Nourriture | Négation | Opinion | Ordres | Participes | Particules | Passif | Passé | Pays | Pluriel | Plus-que-parfait | Politesse | Ponctuation | Possession | Poèmes | Present perfect | Pronoms | Prononciation | Proverbes et structures idiomatiques | Prépositions | Présent | Présenter | Quantité | Question | Question Tags | Relatives | Royaume-Uni | Say, tell ou speak? | Sports | Style direct | Subjonctif | Subordonnées | Suggérer quelque chose | Synonymes | Temps | Tests de niveau | There is/There are | Thierry | This/That? | Tous les tests | Tout | Traductions | Travail | Téléphone | USA | Verbes irréguliers | Vidéo | Villes | Voitures | Voyages | Vêtements


> NOS AUTRES SITES GRATUITS : Cours mathématiques | Cours d'espagnol | Cours d'allemand | Cours de français | Cours de néerlandais | Outils utiles | Bac d'anglais | Learn French | Learn English | Créez des exercices

> INFORMATIONS : Copyright - En savoir plus, Aide, Contactez-nous [Conditions d'utilisation] [Conseils de sécurité] Reproductions et traductions interdites sur tout support (voir conditions) | Contenu des sites déposé chaque semaine chez un huissier de justice | Mentions légales / Vie privée | Cookies.
| Cours, leçons et exercices d'anglais 100% gratuits, hors abonnement internet auprès d'un fournisseur d'accès.